Wednesday round-up

Wednesday round-upLast night the Supreme Court, over a dissent by Justice Sonia Sotomayor that was joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, declined to block the executions of three Ohio men, including one who is scheduled to be put to death this morning. Amy Howe covers the court’s ruling for this blog. Additional coverage comes from Julie […]

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Wednesday round-up

Last night the Supreme Court, over a dissent by Justice Sonia Sotomayor that was joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, declined to block the executions of three Ohio men, including one who is scheduled to be put to death this morning. Amy Howe covers the court’s ruling for this blog. Additional coverage comes from Julie Carr Smyth at the Associated Press, Mark Berman in The Washington Post, and Timothy Mclaughlin at Reuters, who notes that today’s execution “will be the state’s first … in more than three years after a lengthy legal dispute over the choice of lethal injection drugs.”

Briefly:

  • At FiveThirtyEight, Oliver Roeder reports that according to the latest Martin-Quinn scores, which “aim to pinpoint justices’ ideologies on a left-right political spectrum using statistical techniques based on the justices’ votes,” and despite the “small sample size,” Justice Neil Gorsuch “is lining up with the court’s conservative bloc and is beginning to resemble [a] ‘Scalia clone.’”

  • At Politico Magazine, Edward-Isaac Dovere reports that Arnold Schwarzenegger has embraced the “defining cause of his post-gubernatorial career”: redistricting reform, and that the former action hero spends his days “meet[ing] with lawyers and hash[ing] out legal strategy for the Supreme Court case coming in October that could lead to the end of partisan redistricting.”
  • Subscript provides a graphic explainer of the establishment clause question in the entry-ban case.
  • At Governing, J.B. Wogan observes that a 2015 Supreme Court ruling “in favor of churches’ free speech … “had nothing to do with panhandling, but it set a new legal precedent that’s now being used to take down panhandling laws in cities across the country.”
  • The National Association of Attorneys General offers a style guide for Supreme Court brief-writing.

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