Monday round-up

Monday round-upBriefly: Constitution Daily provides an “update on 12 significant decisions that will be handed down from the Court into late June.” At Bloomberg Law’s Cases and Controversies podcast, Jordan Rubin and Kimberly Robinson break down the funniest moments from the Supreme Court’s 2017 term. At PrawfsBlawg, Richard Re remarks that although “[t]he Justices often intone […]

The post Monday round-up appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Monday round-up

Briefly:

  • Constitution Daily provides an “update on 12 significant decisions that will be handed down from the Court into late June.”
  • At Bloomberg Law’s Cases and Controversies podcast, Jordan Rubin and Kimberly Robinson break down the funniest moments from the Supreme Court’s 2017 term.
  • At PrawfsBlawg, Richard Re remarks that although “[t]he Justices often intone that theirs is ‘a court of review, not of first view,’” “last Monday’s decisions illustrate the complexities underlying that maxim,” suggesting that “the ‘first view’ principle is more discretionary than it often appears—and that the Court could do more to explain what guides its choices in this area.”
  • At Take Care, Leah Litman looks at one aspect of “the sentencing fallout from” In Sessions v. Dimaya, in which the court ruled that the catchall section of the immigration law’s criminal-removal provision is unconstitutionally vague, and urges the Sentencing Commission to “reconsider its reliance on language that the Supreme Court has determined is hopelessly unclear.”

  • At Racked, Nadra Little notes that “for nearly a decade, Chastity Jones, an African-American woman, has been trying to get the courts to agree that racial bias may shape corporate grooming policies,” but that last week “the Supreme Court denied her the chance to argue that the company that told her to ditch her dreads infringed on her rights.”
  • At FiveThirtyEight, Ty Schalter looks at the practical consequences of the Supreme Court’s decision last week in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the court struck down the federal law that bars states from legalizing sports betting, observing that “even if our ability to place legal bets is changing, there’s one thing that will probably stay the same: our inability to place good bets.”

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