Sacramento Videos Raise More Questions About Clark Case

Sacramento police released 52 videos and one audio file of the Stephon Clark shooting, showing several instances of officers muting their body-worn microphones and raising questions about the length of time it took law enforcement to render medical aid.

Sacramento police released 52 videos and one audio file of the Stephon Clark shooting, showing several instances of officers muting their body-worn microphones and raising questions about the length of time it took law enforcement to render medical aid, the Sacramento Bee reports. Clark, 22, was shot by two Sacramento police officers on March 18 in the backyard of his grandparents’ house. He was unarmed and holding a cellphone, which officers apparently mistook for a gun. The shooting set off weeks of protests and calls for police reforms in Sacramento to address what many see as bias in the policing of African-American and ethnic communities.

Video released Monday confirms officers waited about five minutes from the time Clark was shot before they approached his body. They then spent about one minute handcuffing and searching him before beginning to administer CPR. By the time fire department rescue workers were cleared by police to enter the scene, it appears that Clark already was dead. A fire department medic can be heard in another video of the same time frame saying, “We’re fixed and dilated here,” an apparent reference to Clark being nonresponsive. Bennet Omalu, a forensic pathologist hired by the family to do an independent autopsy, estimated Clark likely survived between three and 10 minutes after being shot eight times by officers in the neck, torso and leg. “The five minutes’ lapse in time, I’m not sure if it would have saved the life of Stephon Clark, but it would have increased the chances,” said Rashid Sidqe, a police reform activist. “We are looking for a response from the chief whether or not (officers) followed proper protocol, and if they did, how can we make the necessary changes so this doesn’t happen to another member of our community.”

from https://thecrimereport.org