Protests of Charlotte Police Shooting After Dramatic Video

More than 70 supporters of Ruben Galindo sat in silent protest at Monday night’s Charlotte City Council meeting. Galindo, 29, was shot after police responded to a 911 call he had made himself. A video shows Galindo exiting his apartment with his hands raised above his head before officers fatally shot him.

After a dramatic video of a police shooting was released, supporters of a Charlotte man fatally shot by officers last month have called for accountability and even criminal charges against the officers involved, the Charlotte Observer reportsMore than 70 supporters of Ruben Galindo sat in silent protest at Monday night’s Charlotte City Council meeting. Galindo, 29, was shot on Sept. 6 after police responded to a 911 call he had made himself. A video shows Galindo exiting his apartment with his hands raised above his head, three to four seconds before officers fatally shot him. The video, obtained by the Observer through a court order, shows that after Galindo appears at his doorway, Charlotte-Mecklenburg officers began to shout orders to drop his weapon, and a series of gunshots rang out. Galindo then slumped to the ground.

“The video speaks for itself,” said Brian Hochman, an attorney for Galindo’s family. “This is horrific.” It was the city’s latest controversial police shooting and came nearly a year after the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, which prompted unrest that put Charlotte in the national spotlight. Police Chief Kerr Putney said videos never tell the whole story of what officers perceive at the time. Officers have limited options when facing a lethal threat, he said, and have to think about saving their own lives and the lives of others. “I’m not going to second-guess how (officers) perceive a lethal threat,” he added. Critics were less reluctant. “If it’s not a police chief’s job to second-guess his officers, what is his job?” said Mel Tucker, a former FBI agent, police chief and retired training expert who has testified as an expert witness in almost 100 court cases. Corine Mack, president of the local NAACP branch, called the chief’s comment “asinine.”

from https://thecrimereport.org