Today’s True Crime Podcasts: Dostoyevsky Redux

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the legendary 19th century Russian writer and novelist, was well ahead of the modern fascination with True Crime, writes a Russian scholar in the New York Times,

The “true crime” genre continues to grow and shows no signs of stopping. Initially taking off with podcasts like “Serial” and the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer,” podcasts like “In the Dark” and the Netflix series “The Staircase” show how the genre continues to thrive.  Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the legendary 19th century Russian writer and novelist, was well ahead of this modern fascination, Jennifer Wilson writes in a New York Times op-ed.

The piece details Dostoyevsky’s passion for the judiciary, who would often try to sway public opinion on certain cases.   He would frequently attend trials and try to sway public opinion on certain cases. One of his character’s, Rodion Raskolnikov, was commonly invoked by defense attorneys when looking for sympathy from the jury.  Dostoyevsky was very concerned with people’s conception of guilt, and how those who have committed acts of violence and were acquitted were viewed.  He advocated the idea of “collective guilt,” and wanted people to realize their complicity in everyday actions that drive people to commit crimes.  Dostoyevsky’s focus on crime provides a guide for how we can further try to reform our criminal justice system and how we as both individuals and a community can shape it, writes Wilson, a post-doctoral fellow of Russian literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

This summary was prepared by Dane Stallone, a TCR news intern.

from https://thecrimereport.org