Meet the Leadership Blog Series: Going into Law Enforcement to Serve the Community

The IACP Board of Directors is comprised of the IACP Executive Board as well as 33 law enforcement leaders appointed by the IACP President. The members of the Board of Directors represent agencies large and small around the globe and … Continue reading

The IACP Board of Directors is comprised of the IACP Executive Board as well as 33 law enforcement leaders appointed by the IACP President. The members of the Board of Directors represent agencies large and small around the globe and contribute to the governance of the IACP. In the IACP’s Meet the Leadership Blog Series, the IACP will feature brief profiles of the 33 appointed members of the Board of Directors.

Name: William Denke IIiacp-1

Title: Chief of Police

Agency: Sycuan Tribal Police Department, California

Year Joined the IACP: 2005

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: One thing that sits with me is the inspiration I received from my father and grandfather, who proudly served the United States during three different wars, on the value of serving people. Although for me it has been much more at a local level, it is that value and responsibility of service which I lean on the most when dealing with today’s challenges in providing law enforcement and public safety services to our community.

First Heard about IACP: Although I had been aware of IACP most of my law enforcement career, it was not until in 2004 when I was invited to participate in an Indian Country Law Enforcement Section meeting did I really take notice.

Becoming More Involved in IACP: The 2004 meeting is what sealed the deal for me in realizing the invaluable benefits of being involved with such a professional organization. I was absolutely amazed with the amount of diverse assistance that came my way from many law enforcement leaders of IACP –  from the Indian Country Law Enforcement Section to the broader membership.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: I strongly believe that being able to feel some sense of self-reward or recognition keeps a tenured law enforcement officer from getting too thick skinned. I have found this to be true throughout my career, even dealing with some of the very complex issues where measured success can be more difficult to identify.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: The fear of what’s ahead relative to recruitment and retention of qualified law enforcement candidates/officers. It is our responsibility as today’s law enforcement leaders to address the underlying issues with this complex problem to ensure we have strong qualified law enforcement leaders in the future.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: Don’t try to do it by yourself, it takes a team to address the issues of the future. There will be times where leaders will be expected to stand alone when dealing with issues specific to their respective jurisdictions. When this happens, remain impartial and strong by leaning on honorable values and principles.


Name: Sean Duggan IACP photo

Title: Chief of Police

Agency: Chandler, Arizona, Police Department

Year Joined the IACP: 2003

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: I knew at a very early age that I wanted to be a police officer. My father was a New York City police officer and my mother was teacher. I was inspired by their sense of service to the community and the satisfaction they felt by helping others.

First Heard about IACP: I first learned about the IACP in 1996 when I was a sergeant assigned to the Arizona State Gang Task Force. Our task force was nominated for the Webber Seavey Award and I was selected to represent the task force at the annual conference in Orlando, Florida.   

Becoming More Involved in IACP: I participated in a FBI fellowship in Washington, D.C. in 2010, which led to my appointment to the State, Local, and Tribal Based Domestic Security Advisory Committee. The experience provided me with a greater understanding and appreciation of the important role IACP has in shaping our profession.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: Like many of us, I joined policing because I wanted to serve my community and make a difference. Each day I come to work I have opportunities to do just that.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: Our profession is changing at an exponential rate. Technology, emerging crime, and community expectations are changing the nature of policing and presenting extraordinary challenges.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: I would remind the leaders of tomorrow to recognize that in order for departments to successfully carry out their mission of keeping their communities safe, they must earn the support, trust, and respect of those who live and work in their communities.


Name: Jim McDonnell  01-18-16 - MLK Parade.jpg

Title: Sheriff

Agency: Los Angeles County, California, Sheriff’s Department

Year Joined the IACP: 1994

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: I wanted a career that was interesting, allowed me to meet new people on a regular basis, challenged me daily, and at the end of the day led me to feel like I could help somebody.

First Heard about IACP: I had heard about the IACP for years from members of my organization.

Becoming More Involved in IACP: It was an opportunity to be able to share ideas and look for best practices in the industry. The IACP provides a forum for advocacy, networking, and training.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: To be part of a noble profession that puts service above self.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: Policing has never been more complex than it is today. Every day, men and women face situations that are out of control, often fueled by emotion, alcohol, drugs, and mental illness. They’re expected to be right 100% of the time, and against all odds, the vast majority of the time, they are. There is no more challenging or fulfilling way to serve our communities.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: Realize the importance of continuous learning and flexibility. Be able to adapt to a wide variety of challenges with innovative strategies, while maintaining your moral compass.

from https://theiacpblog.org