Mueller’s Year: Does Trump Have Anything to Fear?

Thursday marks one year since the appointment of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller has achieved the unusual distinction of being both intensely reviled and deeply beloved despite appearing on no TV programs and no radio call-in shows. No one on the outside knows where he will end up.

Thursday marks one year since the appointment of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller. Mueller has achieved the unusual distinction of being both intensely reviled and deeply beloved despite appearing on no TV programs and no radio call-in shows; in no newspaper interviews; and posting no Snapchat stories, Facebook Live streams or Twitter threads, NPR reports. Mueller appears to prefer to let his work do the talking for him. Mueller’s office has told a detailed story about a years-long campaign by the Russian government first to reconnoiter and then to attack the democracy of the U.S.

One year of investigating, prosecutions and plea agreements has provided a few clues to what he is doing in both the counterintelligence investigation he inherited from the FBI and a conventional criminal investigation. Of the guilty pleas secured in the year of the Mueller team, the most substantive was that of Paul Manafort’s former partner and Trump’s former campaign vice chairman, Rick Gates. Other pleas are for lying to the FBI. The complexity of Mueller’s task makes it impossible to assess the special counsel’s work from the outside. The record so far is encouraging for President Trump and his administration: no conspiracy charges tying campaign aides to Russian active measures even after all this time. That result followed what Trump and his aides call historic cooperation by the White House and his presidential campaign, including with witnesses and more than one million documents. Vice President Mike Pence cited the one-year mark for Mueller’s work as a good opportunity for him to “wrap it up.” Read another way, Trump and aides still could have a great deal to fear. Prosecutors in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Northern Virginia are putting Manafort and Trump’s longtime attorney, Michael Cohen, under enormous legal pressure.

from https://thecrimereport.org