Law Enforcers Divided Over Using Narcan

Many believe police should carry a nasal spray that prevents people who have overdosed on drugs from dying. Others say treating drug users is a job for medical workers and that police should spend their time fighting crime.

The sheriff of Clermont County, Oh., firmly believes it’s a call of duty for his deputies to carry a nasal spray that brings people back from the brink of death by drug overdose. Less than 50 miles away, his counterpart in Butler County is dead set against it, saying it subjects deputies to danger while making no lasting impact on the death toll. The divide over naloxone, the popular overdose antidote, between nearby sheriffs in two hard-hit counties in one of the hardest-hit states for drug deaths shows just how elusive solutions are on the front lines of the U.S. opioid crisis, the Associated Press reports. Some police officials cite lack of resources for obtaining and maintaining tracking supplies, and for training in when and how to use it. They worry about taking on new duties they say are better suited for medical workers, divert them from fighting crime and can put them in danger. They get support from some citizens weary of people who overdose repeatedly.

Police who do carry it say that development of a nasal spray called Narcan makes naloxone simple to administer, that the $75 two-dose kits are usually given to them by health departments or community organizations, that it’s not a major burden to track supplies and that it’s a natural extension of their mission to serve and protect. An Associated Press survey of Ohio’s 88 sheriffs found that at least 68, or a little more than three-fourths, equip deputies with naloxone. Of those, a half-dozen have begun within the past six months, and most others have less than two years’ experience.

from https://thecrimereport.org