Grassley ‘Incensed’ at Sessions Opposion to Crime Bill

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R-IA) hit back hard at Attorney General Jeff Sessions after his former colleague launched a pre-emptive strike on his criminal justice bill. The legislation, which Grassley has worked on for more than two years, is expected to win committee approval Thursday. It faces a tough climb to the Senate floor amid reluctance from GOP leaders and conservative resistance.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R-IA) hit back hard at Attorney General Jeff Sessions after his former colleague launched a pre-emptive strike on his criminal justice bill, Politico reports. The legislation, which Grassley has worked on for more than two years, is expected to win committee approval Thursday. It faces a tough climb to the Senate floor amid reluctance from GOP leaders and conservative resistance. Sessions said Wednesday that the bipartisan proposal “risks putting the very worst criminals back into our communities.” Grassley responded, “It’s Senator Sessions talking, not a person whose job it is to execute law, and quite frankly I’m very incensed.”

Grassley noted that he supported Sessions’ confirmation, and “when the president was going to fire him, I went to his defense.” The criminal justice bill, which Grassley negotiated with Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), counts co-sponsorship from 18 other senators, evenly distributed between the parties. Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) has shifted his focus to a narrower prison reform measure that he has said has a better chance of Trump signing into law. Grassley is pressing to pass a bill that would ease mandatory minimum sentences for certain nonviolent offenders and end the required life sentence for some repeat drug offenders. Other elements of the proposal would create new mandatory minimum sentences for other categories of offense and bolster punishment for those convicted of trafficking in drugs containing the opioid fentanyl.
Grassley said he agreed with Sessions “that mandatory minimums are important, and we don’t touch that.”

from https://thecrimereport.org