Now accepting internship applications (Deadline extended)

Now accepting internship applications (Deadline extended)SCOTUSblog is still accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” features on the blog and maintaining the case pages. This will require roughly 10 to 20 hours […]

The post Now accepting internship applications (Deadline extended) appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Now accepting internship applications (Deadline extended)

SCOTUSblog is still accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” features on the blog and maintaining the case pages. This will require roughly 10 to 20 hours of work a week on a generally flexible work schedule, which can be accomplished remotely. The position will begin in early to mid-May, and the expected commitment would be through May 2018.

To qualify for the position, you must:

* Have a strong academic record

* Be currently enrolled in a J.D. or LL.M program (undergraduates are not eligible)

* Have excellent organizational skills and attention to detail

* Be able to work independently on deadline

* Have a strong interest in learning about the U.S. Supreme Court and its workings

* Have some experience working with (or at least interest in) blog or website technology

To apply, please send us the following materials:

* Cover letter

* Resume

* Contact information for two references

* A writing sample of no more than five double-spaced pages that has not been edited by anyone other than you

* An official or unofficial law school transcript

Application materials should be sent to Andrew Hamm (ahamm@scotusblog.com) and Molly Runkle (mrunkle@scotusblog.com). Materials must be received by April 28 for consideration.

The post Now accepting internship applications (Deadline extended) appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Reminder: Now accepting internship applications

Reminder: Now accepting internship applicationsSCOTUSblog is now accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. Details about the position’s qualifications and responsibilities, as well as how to apply, are below the jump. The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” […]

The post Reminder: Now accepting internship applications appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Reminder: Now accepting internship applications

SCOTUSblog is now accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. Details about the position’s qualifications and responsibilities, as well as how to apply, are below the jump.

The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” features on the blog and maintaining the case pages. This will require roughly 10 to 20 hours of work a week on a generally flexible work schedule, which can be accomplished remotely. The position will begin in early May, and the expected commitment would be through May 2018.

To qualify for the position, you must:

* Have a strong academic record

* Be currently enrolled in a J.D. or LL.M program (undergraduates are not eligible)

* Have a strong interest in learning about the U.S. Supreme Court and its workings

* Have some experience working with (or at least interest in) blog or website technology

* Have demonstrated excellent writing and editing skills

* Have excellent organizational skills and attention to detail

To apply, please send us the following materials:

* Cover letter

* Resume

* Contact information for two references

* A writing sample of no more than five double-spaced pages that has not been edited by anyone other than you

* An official or unofficial law school transcript

Application materials should be sent to Andrew Hamm (ahamm@scotusblog.com) and Molly Runkle (mrunkle@scotusblog.com). Materials must be received by April 18 for consideration.

The post Reminder: Now accepting internship applications appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

SCOTUS Map: March and April 2017

Justice Sonia Sotomayor mingled with the crowd and dispensed advice to Stanford University students on March 10. “Figure out first how to be a generally informed citizen before specializing in anything else,” Sotomayor told them. “It might lead you to find an interest you can’t imagine. It will make you good company for others. If […]

The post SCOTUS Map: March and April 2017 appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor mingled with the crowd and dispensed advice to Stanford University students on March 10. “Figure out first how to be a generally informed citizen before specializing in anything else,” Sotomayor told them. “It might lead you to find an interest you can’t imagine. It will make you good company for others. If you tell interesting stories about interesting things, people will gravitate to you.” At the end of the talk, Sotomayor received a T-shirt bearing the words “Fear The Nerds” on the front and “#NerdUp” on the back. “I grew up being a nerd. Take pride in being nerds,” she remarked. Coverage of the event comes from Mercury News and Stanford University News. A brief video clip is available on abc7news’ website. C-SPAN will air the full program at 8 p.m. EDT today.

While Sotomayor was in Palo Alto, Chief Justice John Roberts was in New York to participate in a panel hosted by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. The subject of the panel was Judge Henry Friendly, for whom Roberts clerked after graduating from law school. Roberts shared the stage with 2nd Circuit Judge Jon Newman and six fellow Friendly clerks, including Chief Judge Merrick Garland of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Roberts and Garland remembered Friendly as an “intellectual giant” and a “big-picture judge” who always walked his clerks through his reasoning process, even in the most mundane of cases. Garland — who worked for Friendly the year before Roberts did — joked at one point that he didn’t know how he had obtained his own clerkship, but he did know how Roberts got his, as Garland had called Harvard Law School on Friendly’s behalf to find the best student.

Roberts presided over a March 15 mock trial based on events in Mark Twain’s novel “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Adam Liptak of the New York Times covered the proceedings, which were organized by the Washington University School of Law in St. Louis but took place at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington.

On the same night, Justice Samuel Alito served as the featured speaker for a St. Paul Inside the Walls Advocati Christi event in New Jersey. According to the Associated Press, Alito spoke about both the history of discrimination that Catholics encountered in this country and his own personal experience of growing up Catholic. He recalled watching John F. Kennedy become the first Catholic president in 1960, when Alito was 10 years old: “I felt it had lifted me up from the status of second-class American.” Alito warned the audience, however, that today “a wind is picking up that is hostile to those with traditional moral beliefs.” The following week, Alito traveled to Pennsylvania to deliver a lecture about the Constitution at the Heritage Center of the Union League of Philadelphia.

Sotomayor spoke on the subject of civic engagement at the Aspen Institute on March 24. Asked about what people can do to “reignite civic spirit in America,” Sotomayor responded: “We are never going to reach equality in America — as Latinos, as blacks, as anything — until we achieve equality in education.” Sotomayor stressed the importance of teaching children to be active participants in their communities and promoted iCivics, an organization that retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor founded (and for which Sotomayor serves as a board member) to provide civic education through games and other interactive tools. Video of the event is posted on YouTube.

On March 30, Justice Clarence Thomas addressed students at the 70th Annual Horatio Alger Awards and National Scholars Conference in Washington. A brief recap is available at the organization’s Facebook page.

On April 1, Sotomayor returned to Princeton University, where she received her undergraduate degree, for the “¡Adelante Tigres! Celebrating Latino Alumni at Princeton University” conference. The justice was candid about the insecurities she faced, both when she was a new student at Princeton and when she was nominated to the Supreme Court. Of the former, Sotomayor stated, “I had no idea about the prestige of Princeton or how I would be perceived here. I had no idea of the world I’d thrust myself into — I was a fish out of water.” Of the battle that surrounded her 2009 nomination, she recalled, “There were reports that I wasn’t smart enough, and there were reports that I was abrasive and not nice. Lots of negative stuff was said about me. And it was incredibly, incredibly painful. It hurt … And I actually, seriously thought about pulling out of the process.” Sotomayor credited her friends and her community with helping her press forward in both situations. Coverage comes from The Times of Trenton, CentralJersey.com, Princeton Alumni Weekly and The Daily Princetonian.

A couple of days later, Sotomayor arrived in upstate New York for a whirlwind tour, visiting three Albany-area schools and attending a portrait unveiling at the New York Court of Appeals. On April 3, Albany Law School honored Sotomayor with the Kate Stoneman Award, which is presented to those in the legal profession who have demonstrated a commitment to seeking change and equal opportunities for women. According to The Daily Gazette, Sotomayor described her efforts at making her writing accessible to a wide audience: “Most people don’t read our decisions. But I want to make sure that anyone who picks up one of mine, if you take the legal notes out, you don’t need more than a fifth-grade education to follow what I’m saying.”

Sotomayor did double duty on April 4, appearing at Russell Sage College in the morning and the University of Albany in the evening. The Troy Record covered the Russell Sage College appearance, where the justice emphasized the need for after-school programs: “When I am asked what we can do to change the lives of so many kids in our neighborhoods, I say, keep them busy after school.” WNYT has additional coverage and short videos from the event. The Legislative Gazette has a rundown of the University of Albany talk, and the university posted a brief video clip on its Twitter account.

New Haven was next on Sotomayor’s schedule. On April 6, she discussed her experiences with public interest work at the 20th Anniversary Liman Colloquium at Yale Law School. The following day, she attended another portrait unveiling – this time, her own. Yale Law School has a summary of the festivities.

All of the justices gathered in Washington on April 10 for the swearing-in of their newest colleague, Justice Neil Gorsuch. Roberts administered the constitutional oath of office to Gorsuch in a private ceremony in the justices’ conference room, which was followed by a second ceremony in the White House Rose Garden, with Justice Anthony Kennedy – for whom Gorsuch once clerked – presiding over the judicial oath. Coverage comes from SCOTUSblog, the New York Times, the Washington Post, USA Today and CBS News.

Later that afternoon, Allegheny College honored Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the late Justice Antonin Scalia with its Prize for Civility in Public Life. (Scalia’s family accepted the award on his behalf at the ceremony.) “At my workplace, collegiality really matters,” Ginsburg told the audience. “We could not do the important work the Constitution assigns to the Court unless we genuinely respect each other.” SCOTUSblog and the Meadville Tribune posted recaps of her speech. Video of Ginsburg discussing her famous friendship with Scalia and her hope that members of Congress will restore “harmonious work ways” is available online.

At the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on April 11, Roberts offered up a sanguine vision of an apolitical court, stating that “[t]he new justice is not a Republican. He’s not a Democrat. He’s a member of the Supreme Court.” However, Roberts acknowledged, “It’s hard for people to understand that when they see the process that leads up to it … That’s very unfortunate, because we in the judiciary do not do our business in a partisan, ideological manner.” Roberts noted that since Scalia’s death, “the Supreme Court has been quietly going about its business of deciding the cases before it, according to the Constitution, in a completely nonpartisan way.” The Albany Times Union and the Washington Post covered Roberts’ talk. The school posted full video on its YouTube account.

Also on April 11, Alito adjudicated the inaugural Judge Leonard I. Garth competition, which presented a hypothetical First Amendment case before competing teams from Rutgers Law School’s Newark and Camden campuses. In his first year out of law school, Alito clerked for the moot court competition’s namesake.

On April 13, Justice Stephen Breyer gave the keynote address at the 43rd Annual Wolfgang Friedmann Conference at Columbia Law School. Breyer talked about his latest book, “The Court and the World.”

Next Thursday, Alito will be in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the 2017 Third Circuit Judicial Conference, where he will present the American Inns of Court Professionalism Award and participate in a fireside chat.

The post SCOTUS Map: March and April 2017 appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

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Event announcement

Event announcementOn April 18 at 12 p.m., the Heritage Foundation will host a panel discussion previewing the next day’s oral argument in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer. Speakers will include Jordan Lorence, Hannah Smith and Walter Weber; Elizabeth Slattery will host. More information about this event, which will be held at the foundation’s Allison […]

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Event announcement

On April 18 at 12 p.m., the Heritage Foundation will host a panel discussion previewing the next day’s oral argument in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer. Speakers will include Jordan Lorence, Hannah Smith and Walter Weber; Elizabeth Slattery will host. More information about this event, which will be held at the foundation’s Allison Auditorium in Washington, is available on its website.

The post Event announcement appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Now accepting internship applications

Now accepting internship applicationsSCOTUSblog is now accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. Details about the position’s qualifications and responsibilities, as well as how to apply, are below the jump. The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” […]

The post Now accepting internship applications appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Now accepting internship applications

SCOTUSblog is now accepting applications from current law students interested in interning with us. Details about the position’s qualifications and responsibilities, as well as how to apply, are below the jump.

The principal focus of the internship (which is a paid one) will be assisting with the “Petition of the day” and “Petitions to watch” features on the blog and maintaining the case pages. This will require roughly 10 to 20 hours of work a week on a generally flexible work schedule, which can be accomplished remotely. The position will begin in early May, and the expected commitment would be through May 2018.

To qualify for the position, you must:

* Have a strong academic record

* Be currently enrolled in a J.D. or LL.M program (undergraduates are not eligible)

* Have a strong interest in learning about the U.S. Supreme Court and its workings

* Have some experience working with (or at least interest in) blog or website technology

* Have demonstrated excellent writing and editing skills

* Have excellent organizational skills and attention to detail

To apply, please send us the following materials:

* Cover letter

* Resume

* Contact information for two references

* A writing sample of no more than five double-spaced pages that has not been edited by anyone other than you

* An official or unofficial law school transcript

Application materials should be sent to Andrew Hamm (ahamm@scotusblog.com) and Molly Runkle (mrunkle@scotusblog.com). Materials must be received by April 18 for consideration.

The post Now accepting internship applications appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

On day successor takes seat, Justice Scalia posthumously awarded prize for civility along with Justice Ginsburg

On day successor takes seat, Justice Scalia posthumously awarded prize for civility along with Justice GinsburgA friendship that has been memorialized in an opera and a widely shared picture of an elephant has now officially received an award. In a short ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, President James Mullen of Allegheny College awarded the school’s 2017 Prize for Civility in Public Life to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg […]

The post On day successor takes seat, Justice Scalia posthumously awarded prize for civility along with Justice Ginsburg appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

On day successor takes seat, Justice Scalia posthumously awarded prize for civility along with Justice Ginsburg

A friendship that has been memorialized in an opera and a widely shared picture of an elephant has now officially received an award. In a short ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, President James Mullen of Allegheny College awarded the school’s 2017 Prize for Civility in Public Life to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and posthumously to Justice Antonin Scalia.

Mullen called the honor “particularly timely” for newly sworn in Justice Neil Gorsuch, because the “example set by our two recipients will afford him most elegant testimony to the collegial spirit that has supported the Supreme Court for over two centuries.”

Although Ginsburg did not address any comments to her new colleague, she opened her remarks by insisting that “collegiality really matters” in order for the court to accomplish the important work assigned to it by the Constitution. She noted that the justices greet one another with a handshake before each argument day and conference morning as a sign of this collegiality. Gorsuch’s first conference will be on Thursday, and his first argument will come next Monday.

A line from a duet Ginsburg’s character sings with Scalia in their eponymous opera, which Ginsburg recited, seemed to offer a welcoming gesture to the junior justice:

Separate strands unite in friction
To protect our country’s core.
This, the strength of our nation,
Thus is our Court’s design:
We are kindred,
We are nine. 

Ginsburg did remind the audience that the Senate confirmed her nomination in a 96-3 vote in a process she called “altogether civil,” and that Scalia was unanimously confirmed. Although she did not mention the most recent confirmation explicitly, she hoped members of Congress would take note.

For his part, Scalia’s son, Eugene, in accepting the award, joked that it was the first his father ever received for “civility,” which Eugene surmised is “not the first word that rolls off the tongue of lawyers who appeared before him.”

Eugene Scalia further remarked that the friendship between the two justices was really one of couples, and he recalled many New Years Eves spent with his father, his mother, who was in the audience, Ginsburg and her late husband, Marty Ginsburg.

The post On day successor takes seat, Justice Scalia posthumously awarded prize for civility along with Justice Ginsburg appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

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A “view” from the Rose Garden: Neil Gorsuch takes the judicial oath

Despite our best efforts to explain the two oaths a new justice must take and the traditions surrounding the administration of the oaths, there evidently is still some confusion going around. When I arrive at the White House press room this morning in advance of Neil Gorsuch’s Rose Garden ceremony, I overhear a correspondent talking […]

The post A “view” from the Rose Garden: Neil Gorsuch takes the judicial oath appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Despite our best efforts to explain the two oaths a new justice must take and the traditions surrounding the administration of the oaths, there evidently is still some confusion going around.

When I arrive at the White House press room this morning in advance of Neil Gorsuch’s Rose Garden ceremony, I overhear a correspondent talking on the phone to his editor about the “ceremonial re-enactment” of the oath about to take place.

When he hangs up, I gently offer a clarification: Gorsuch took his constitutional oath, which was administered by Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. in the justices’ conference room at the Supreme Court, at 9 this morning. And at 11 a.m., here at the White House, Justice Anthony Kennedy will administer the judicial oath to Gorsuch, which is just as necessary to become a full-fledged justice.

Photo by Mark Walsh

Or so we think. There will be bit more confusion a little later on in the Rose Garden, where the sun is shining and the temperature is in the 70s. It is reminiscent of March 16, 2016, when President Barack Obama announced Chief Judge Merrick Garland as his nominee to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

At the back of the garden today, a U.S. Marine Corps string ensemble is providing an elegant soundtrack to the event.

The audience is filled with many of the Gorsuch supporters who were in the East Room of the White House on Jan. 30 when President Donald Trump announced Gorsuch as his nominee. Several of those were also a frequent presence at Gorsuch’s confirmation hearing.

Some special guests will be singled out by Trump or Gorsuch, but among the other notables is Leonard Leo, who is on leave from the Federalist Society to work on the Gorsuch nomination and is the subject of a Jeffrey Toobin profile this week in The New Yorker. Leo is in the third row, seated behind the spouses of the justices.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is here, near the front. A bit farther back in the crowd is Rachel Brand, a former Kennedy law clerk whose nomination to be associate attorney general has been forwarded to the full Senate. Greg Garre, a solicitor general under President George W. Bush is here, as is C. Boyden Gray, a former White House counsel under President George H. W. Bush.

A bit farther back, in the last row of guests before the two rows of seats set aside for the press, are two prominent progressive-leaning lawyers who backed Gorsuch’s nomination. David Frederick, a Supreme Court litigator who wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post in March supporting the nomination (as virtually every Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee pointed out during the hearing), is here. And in the same row is Neal Katyal, the former acting solicitor general under Obama who wrote an op-ed in support of Gorsuch in The New York Times and testified on the opening day of the hearing.

Just before the ceremony begins, the seven members of the court (except for Kennedy, who will enter with Trump and Gorsuch) arrive and take seats in the front row. They evidently do not agree with retired Justice John Paul Stevens, who did not think it appropriate for sitting justices to attend White House swearing-in ceremonies, though he relented when he was called upon to swear in Roberts as chief justice in 2005. Already seated near the justices’ spouses are the court’s chief officers: Marshal Pam Talkin, Clerk Scott Harris, and Jeffrey Minear, the counselor to the chief justice.

A voice over the loudspeaker announces Trump, Kennedy and “Justice Gorsuch.” Is Gorsuch a justice by virtue of having taken just the first of his two oaths?

The late Justice Byron White, for whom Gorsuch also served as a law clerk when White had just retired in 1993, would have disagreed. (As we noted last week, White made a point, when presiding over Clarence Thomas’s constitutional oath in a 1991 White House ceremony, to say that only when Thomas took his judicial oath, scheduled at a later date, would he be a justice.)

Trump welcomes the justices. He welcomes Senators Cory Gardner of Colorado, who helped introduce Gorsuch at his confirmation hearing; Mike Lee of Utah; and Mike Crapo of Idaho. All are Republican, and the latter two serve on the Judiciary Committee. The president also welcomes Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R-Iowa).

 

Photo by Mark Walsh

Trump notes that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), could not be here today, but he thanks him “for all that he did to make this achievement possible.”

“I’ve always heard that the most important thing that a president of the United States does is appoint people, hopefully great people like this appointment, to the United States Supreme Court, and I can say this is a great honor,” the president said, reading from his teleprompter. But then he ad-libs, “And I got it done in the first 100 days. You think that’s easy?”

Trump asks Maureen Scalia, Scalia’s widow, to stand, while he pays testament to her and to Scalia. She is seated in the front row, between Justice Elena Kagan and Scalia’s son Eugene.

“In Justice Gorsuch,” Trump says, the American people “see a man of great and unquestioned integrity. They see a man of unmatched qualifications. And most importantly, they see a man who is deeply faithful to the Constitution of the United States.”

Trump heaps praise on Kennedy, and says “it is a very special moment” for Kennedy to swear in Gorsuch and for the first time have a justice serve with one of his former law clerks.

With an invitation from Trump to say a few words, Kennedy thanks the president and says, “Mr. Chief Justice, Justice Gorsuch, and my fellow adherents to the idea and the reality of the rule of law,” before explaining the origin of the constitutional and judicial oaths.

“Both of these oaths remind us that we as a people are bound together,” Kennedy says. “We as a people find our self-definition, our respect, our heritage, and our destiny in the Constitution.”

“And so, Justice Gorsuch, there is one oath remaining for you to take, the judicial oath, before you may receive and accept your commission” from the president, Kennedy says.

Kennedy and Gorsuch move a few steps away from the lectern, while a military aide escorts Louise Gorsuch to the riser. She will hold the family Bible. As Kennedy begins to recite the oath, the audience is disappointed that the sound is not amplified in the Rose Garden. (On TV, the oath is audible, but only over the clacking of automatic shutters in the press photographers’ cameras.)

Gorsuch thanks Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, who is in the first row. He says he can’t thank everyone he should, but he singles out White House Counsel Don McGahn and Mark Paoletta, the vice president’s counsel. (We may have missed him, but we don’t see Greg Katsas, the deputy White House counsel, here today. McGahn and Katsas attended much of Gorsuch’s confirmation hearing.)

He thanks Kelly Ayotte, the former U.S. senator from New Hampshire who was his chief “sherpa” during the confirmation process. He thanks his former law clerks, his now-former colleagues on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, and his new colleagues on the Supreme Court.

He has so many thank yous, his remarks are starting to sound like an Oscars speech. But we don’t think the Marine ensemble will play him off the stage.

He thanks his wife, who is now standing behind him next to the president, and his daughters, “Emma and Bindy” (Belinda), who are making their first public appearance related to the confirmation.

“To the American people,” he says, “I am humbled by the trust placed in me today. I will never forget that to whom much is given, much will be expected. I promise you that I will do all my powers permit to be a faithful servant of the Constitution and laws of this great nation.”

With that, Gorsuch has a handshake for the president, a hug for Kennedy and a shoulder rub for his wife.

The Associated Press will soon transmit photos with captions that refer to the ceremony as a “re-enactment” of his first oath. The only real re-enactment will come sometime soon when the Supreme Court holds an investiture ceremony in the courtroom, during which Gorsuch will repeat the judicial oath.

But we can now refer to him, without any doubt, as Justice Gorsuch.

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Judge Neil Gorsuch takes constitutional oath at Supreme Court

        Photos courtesy of Franz Jantzen, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

The post Judge Neil Gorsuch takes constitutional oath at Supreme Court appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Chief Justice John Roberts administers the constitutional oath to Judge Neil Gorsuch in a private ceremony attended by the justices of the Supreme Court and members of the Gorsuch family.

 

Judge Neil Gorsuch signs the constitutional oath.

 

Chief Justice John Roberts and Judge Neil Gorsuch

 

Justice Anthony Kennedy and Judge Neil Gorsuch

 

Photos courtesy of Franz Jantzen, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

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Event announcement

Event announcementOn April 21 at 3:20 p.m., the International Municipal Lawyers Association will host a panel discussion regarding cases of interest to local governments on this term’s Supreme Court docket. Speakers will include Paul Clement, Gregory Garre and Amy Howe; Lisa Soronen will serve as moderator. More information about this event and the IMLA seminar, which will […]

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Event announcement

On April 21 at 3:20 p.m., the International Municipal Lawyers Association will host a panel discussion regarding cases of interest to local governments on this term’s Supreme Court docket. Speakers will include Paul Clement, Gregory Garre and Amy Howe; Lisa Soronen will serve as moderator. More information about this event and the IMLA seminar, which will take place at the Omni Shoreham hotel in Washington, is available at this link.

The post Event announcement appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Event announcement

Event announcementOn April 20 at 6:30 p.m., the National Constitution Center will host a panel discussion addressing how a Justice Neil Gorsuch could change the Supreme Court. Speakers will include Joan Biskupic, Ilya Shapiro and Brianne Gorod; Jeffrey Rosen will serve as moderator. More information about this event, which will be held at the NCC in […]

The post Event announcement appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Event announcement

On April 20 at 6:30 p.m., the National Constitution Center will host a panel discussion addressing how a Justice Neil Gorsuch could change the Supreme Court. Speakers will include Joan Biskupic, Ilya Shapiro and Brianne Gorod; Jeffrey Rosen will serve as moderator. More information about this event, which will be held at the NCC in Philadelphia, is available at this link.

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from http://www.scotusblog.com