Decreasing Criminality and Parole and Probation

Observations Offenders will not change until they are personally ready for change. Major events like parenthood, a job or treatment seemed to have little impact unless the offender was ready for change. Parole was not only a failed deterrent for many, but it was a direct impediment to successful reentry. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. […]

Observations Offenders will not change until they are personally ready for change. Major events like parenthood, a job or treatment seemed to have little impact unless the offender was ready for change. Parole was not only a failed deterrent for many, but it was a direct impediment to successful reentry. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Percent of Arrests Not Prosecuted

Observations Federal Data: 16 to 50 percent of federal crimes are deferred from prosecution, per “Federal Justice Statistics.” State Data: 34 percent of state felony cases are not convicted (approximately nine percent involve a deferred adjudication or diversion outcome), per “Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties.” Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking […]

Observations Federal Data: 16 to 50 percent of federal crimes are deferred from prosecution, per “Federal Justice Statistics.” State Data: 34 percent of state felony cases are not convicted (approximately nine percent involve a deferred adjudication or diversion outcome), per “Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties.” Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Average Bail for Pretrial Detainees in NYC Doubled to $16,800, Report Finds

The new study released by John Jay College of Criminal Justice also says the average length of stay for pretrial detainees has increased from 40 to 55 days between 2000 and 2015— even as the number of detentions has dropped.

The average cash bail set for pretrial admissions in New York City has doubled from $7,800 to $16,800 in the past 15 years, and the pretrial length of stay has increased significantly from 2000 to 2015—even as the admissions for pretrial detention decreased by almost half, according to a new study on pretrial detentions in New York City.

The report, released today by the Misdemeanor Justice Project (MJP) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, said the average time in detention has gone from 40 to 55 days.  

The study also indicates a dramatic change in the criminal profile of detainees over the 15 year period.  While the number of those detained on drug felony charges dropped, violent crime charges increased, representing the highest crime category by 2015.

John Jay President Jeremy Travis and Professor Preeti Chauhan presented key findings of the study this morning at a forum co-sponsored by the Citizens Crime Commission of New York City.

“Understanding trends in custody is complex and impacted by the characteristics of those coming through the front door of corrections,” said Professor Chauhan.  “In this report, we examine trends in bail amount, length of stay and discharge status by charge level and category, demographics and borough, and seek to provide background information about how the pretrial admissions population has changed over time.

“We hope this report adds to a better understanding of those detained pretrial in New York City; an understudied group.”

Key findings of the report include:

  1. The average pretrial length of stay increased significantly, from 40 days to 55 days. The average pretrial length of stay for felony admissions increased from 62 days to 80 days and for misdemeanor admissions from 13 days to 17 days.
  2. For pretrial admissions, the charge categories with the largest increases in pretrial length of stay were violent crimes, burglary, and weapon charges. The average pretrial length of stay for violent crimes increased from 89 days to 119 days (a 34.9 percent increase), for burglary increased from 71 to 96 days (a 35.1 percent increase), and for weapon charges increased from 40 to 72 days (a 78.4 percent increase).
  3. The average bail amount set for pretrial admissions more than doubled, from approximately $7,800 to $16,800. Average bail amounts increased for felony admissions ($12,600 to $26,000) and misdemeanor admissions ($1,500 to $2,100).
  4. For pretrial admissions, the highest proportion of discharges were for bail paid, 30.3 percent in 2000 and 35.4 percent in 2015.  Discharges for ROR, the second highest proportion of discharges, accounted for 23.3 percent in 2000 and 21.5 percent in 2015. The average length of stay for these discharge categories increased from 10 days to 14 days and 30 days to 36 days, respectively.
  5. Pretrial admissions that resulted in a transfer to state prison had the highest bail amount set and highest average length of stay. Notably, the average bail amount set this category increased from $22,560 to $74,253, an almost three-fold increase (229.1 percent); and the average length of stay increased from 170 days to 284 days, a 66.4 percent increase.

With funding by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, this is the sixth report prepared by the Misdemeanor Justice Project, a research initiative at John Jay College headed by Preeti Chauhan that includes faculty, graduate students and staff. Previous MJP reports have focused on trends in police enforcement practices and trends in corrections.

The full report is available here.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Science, Evidence-Based Principles, Donald Trump And Crime Control

Observations Does everyone in the criminological community religiously adhere to scientific, evidence-based principals before suggesting or implementing policy? What we want and what we can prove are two different things. That applies to Donald Trump. It also applies to the rest of us. Just as every cop is a criminal, and all the sinners saints-The […]

Observations Does everyone in the criminological community religiously adhere to scientific, evidence-based principals before suggesting or implementing policy? What we want and what we can prove are two different things. That applies to Donald Trump. It also applies to the rest of us. Just as every cop is a criminal, and all the sinners saints-The […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Violent Crimes Are Not A Federal Priority

Observations Violent crime is not a major focus of federal law enforcement or prosecution. A small percentage of federal crimes are violent. It’s reasonable to conclude that it may be time for a new federal focus on violent crime. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

Observations Violent crime is not a major focus of federal law enforcement or prosecution. A small percentage of federal crimes are violent. It’s reasonable to conclude that it may be time for a new federal focus on violent crime. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Offender Recidivism: Do Violent Offenders Recidivate More?

Observations The mast majority of offenders released from prison return to the criminal justice system based on arrests, convictions, and incarcerations. The crime upon conviction just doesn’t seem to make that much of a difference. Age upon release plus criminal history and possibly sex seem to be the main drivers of recidivism. Can prison rehabilitation or […]

Observations The mast majority of offenders released from prison return to the criminal justice system based on arrests, convictions, and incarcerations. The crime upon conviction just doesn’t seem to make that much of a difference. Age upon release plus criminal history and possibly sex seem to be the main drivers of recidivism. Can prison rehabilitation or […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Noncitizens, Immigrants and Crime

Observations With 65,000 non-citizens incarcerated (it was 103,000 in 2012) and 178,000 undocumented immigrants deported last year who were convicted criminals, crime and illegal immigration are connected. The Department of Homeland Security has estimated that 1.9 million noncitizens have been convicted of criminal offenses and could be deported. The unanswered question is the degree of […]

Observations With 65,000 non-citizens incarcerated (it was 103,000 in 2012) and 178,000 undocumented immigrants deported last year who were convicted criminals, crime and illegal immigration are connected. The Department of Homeland Security has estimated that 1.9 million noncitizens have been convicted of criminal offenses and could be deported. The unanswered question is the degree of […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

What is Jeff Sessions’ Project Exile? Is it Effective?

Observations Is Project Exile Donald Trump’s and Jeff Sessions’ primary anti-violence effort? Launched in 1997 by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, homicides in Richmond exhibited a 22 percent yearly decline, compared with the average reduction of about 10 percent per year for other large U.S. cities. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for […]

Observations Is Project Exile Donald Trump’s and Jeff Sessions’ primary anti-violence effort? Launched in 1997 by the U.S. Attorney’s Office, homicides in Richmond exhibited a 22 percent yearly decline, compared with the average reduction of about 10 percent per year for other large U.S. cities. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Economic Criminology-Trump’s Crime Address To Congress

Observations An examination of Trump’s speech to Congress focusing on crime and justice issues. For those insisting that violent crime is not increasing, you risk being left behind in a national conversation. The rest of us have moved on to solutions. Trump understands that violent crime profoundly affects everything, including the economy and jobs. But […]

Observations An examination of Trump’s speech to Congress focusing on crime and justice issues. For those insisting that violent crime is not increasing, you risk being left behind in a national conversation. The rest of us have moved on to solutions. Trump understands that violent crime profoundly affects everything, including the economy and jobs. But […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

What Causes Violent Crime? New Video

What causes violent crime in the United States? What are the factors contributing to violent crime?  What are the root causes? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing one of the most requested articles on the website. For a complete understanding of the top factors driving violent crime, see Factors Contributing to Violence. […]

What causes violent crime in the United States? What are the factors contributing to violent crime?  What are the root causes? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing one of the most requested articles on the website. For a complete understanding of the top factors driving violent crime, see Factors Contributing to Violence. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net