One Killed, 15 Others Shot in Cincinnati Nightclub

It was the biggest mass shooting in the U.S. so far this year. City Manager Harry Black said the incident was the culmination of a squabble “between two specific groups or individuals earlier in the day, escalating and ultimately leading to this tragedy.”

As clubgoers danced away on Saturday night, armed men hoping to settle a daylong score opened fire inside Cincinnati’s Cameo nightclub in the bloodiest mass shooting in the nation so far this year. One man died of his injuries and 15 others were injured, the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. The violence at 1:30 a.m. triggered a sweeping panic inside the packed club while patrons raced to flee. Once on the scene to triage victims, police and firefighters had to step over wounded bodies to determine which patients needed the most immediate care, said Dan Hils of the Cincinnati Fraternal Order of Police. Investigators scoured the city for the people responsible for the shootings. The Rev. Peterson Mingo of Evanston’s Christ Temple Church said he and other leaders of the African-American community have heard from citizens who “have been giving us names and we’re sending them to the police, and they say they’re cooperating.”

“People were just going to have a good time, and they got shot. That is totally unacceptable,” said Mayor John Cranley said. City Manager Harry Black said the shooting was the culmination of a squabble “between two specific groups or individuals earlier in the day, escalating and ultimately leading to this tragedy.” Cameo had paid for four off-duty police officers to patrol the parking lot, and they were the first to respond to the shooting, Hils, the FOP president, said. “They saw a lot of the patrons running out in an absolute panic,” Hils said. “They were literally stepping over victims to get to more critically injured victims. So you’re talking about a very horrific scene there. They tried everything they could to save the one gentleman’s life. They performed CPR, the police officer did, but to no avail.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

One Dead, 14 Injured in Cincinnati Nightclub Shooting

Police identified no motive for the incident, which was reported as the worst mass shooting in the U.S. so far this year.

One person is dead and at least 14 more were injured in a shooting early Sunday morning at a Cincinnati-area nightclub called Cameo, the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. “It was a chaotic scene,” said police Sgt. Eric Franz. “The club was completely packed.” One man inside the club described seeing a “big brawl” break out before hearing at least 20 shots being fired. “It was a big gun because you heard it over the music,” said Mauricio Thompson. “Everybody’s running. Everybody scattered to get out of the club.”

“This conflict is believed to have begun between two specific groups or individuals earlier in the day, escalating and ultimately leading to this tragedy,” City Manager Harry Black said. “Cameo club has a history of gun violence including a shooting inside the club on New Years Day 2015 and a shooting in the parking lot” that year.” No arrests have been made. Assistant Chief Paul Neudigate tweeted that the “motive is still unclear, but there are no indication this incident is terrorism related.” It was the worst mass shooting in term of the number of victims so far in 2017, according to Gunviolencearchive.com. The U.S. has had 71 mass shootings this year, says Gunviolenceresearch.org.

 

from https://thecrimereport.org

Angry-Frustrated Cops-New Data From Pew

Observations About half of the officers surveyed (51%) say their work nearly always (10%) or often (41%) makes them feel frustrated. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

Observations About half of the officers surveyed (51%) say their work nearly always (10%) or often (41%) makes them feel frustrated. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

‘Stand Your Ground’ Rejected in Florida Theater Killing

Retired Tampa Bay police captain Curtis Reeves Jr. will face murder and battery charges for killing a fellow movie patron in a dispute over a cell phone. A judge ruled that he could not rely on Florida’s “stand your ground” law.

Retired Tampa Bay police captain Curtis Reeves Jr. will face second-degree murder and aggravated battery charges after a judge rejected his petition to dismiss the case based on Florida’s “stand your ground” law, the Christian Science Monitor reports. Reeves killed Chad Oulson at a suburban Tampa theater in 2014 over Oulson’s use of a cell phone during previews of the movie “Lone Survivor.” The ruling comes as Florida’s state senate prepares to vote on a bill that would force prosecutors to prove that a defendant was not acting in self-defense before cases are brought to trial. That would shift the burden of proof away from defendants, putting Florida at the vanguard of the two dozen states with laws permitting the use of force in self-defense – in some cases, deadly force – in confrontations where a person “fears death or great bodily harm.”

Reeves argued that the dispute became a “life or death struggle,” claiming that Oulson had struck him with either his fist or cell phone and cornered him in his seat. The judge rejected that account, finding that surveillance video countered Reeves’ claims of being hit or menaced by Oulson.  The bill being considered by Florida’s Senate has opposition from Democrats and prosecutors, who say it would stack the odds against victims of gun crimes and encourage vigilantism.Among supporters of the bill is Marissa Alexander, who was convicted in 2012 to 20 years in prison for firing what she calls a “warning shot” near her estranged husband, in another high-profile, stand-your-ground case in Florida. Alexander’s conviction was later thrown out, and she was freed in a 2014 plea deal.

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Dennis Strable

Dennis Dean Strable Homicide Dennis Strable 59 YOA 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard Des Moines, IA Polk County July 24, 2016   ennis Dean Strable, 59, was shot and killed at approximately 4:33 a.m. Sunday, July 24, 2016, while riding his bicycle near 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard in Des Moines while on his way […]

Dennis Dean Strable Homicide Dennis Strable 59 YOA 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard Des Moines, IA Polk County July 24, 2016   ennis Dean Strable, 59, was shot and killed at approximately 4:33 a.m. Sunday, July 24, 2016, while riding his bicycle near 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard in Des Moines while on his way […]

from https://iowacoldcases.org

Dennis Strable

Dennis Dean Strable Homicide Dennis Strable 59 YOA 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard Des Moines, IA Polk County July 24, 2016   ennis Dean Strable, 59, was shot and killed at approximately 4:33 a.m. Sunday, July 24, 2016, while riding his bicycle near 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard in Des Moines while on his way […]

Dennis Dean Strable Homicide Dennis Strable 59 YOA 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard Des Moines, IA Polk County July 24, 2016   ennis Dean Strable, 59, was shot and killed at approximately 4:33 a.m. Sunday, July 24, 2016, while riding his bicycle near 45th Street and Kingman Boulevard in Des Moines while on his way […]

from https://iowacoldcases.org

Why Are Shootings Deadlier in Some U.S. Cities?

Shootings are a better measure of gun violence than murders are, writes analyst Jeff Asher. Cincinnati is one of the most violent cities among 17 whose data he obtained, as measured by shootings, despite having comparatively few murders. Newark is the opposite: a city with more murders than its shooting rate would suggest.

Shootings are a better measure of gun violence than murders are, writes Jeff Asher for FiveThirtyEight.com. There is a lot of randomness in what happens once a bullet leaves a gun — whether someone lives or dies depends heavily on luck. Focusing just on murder leaves out all the people who could have died. And it ignores the life-changing injuries and emotional trauma that often accompany nonfatal shootings. Gun violence researchers are often forced to focus on murders rather than shootings for one simple reason: better data. Cities are not required by the FBI to track shootings specifically, and many cities choose not to count them.

Cities with the worst murder rates do not necessarily have the highest rates of gun violence victimization, as measured by shooting victims per capita. Murder rates may better serve as a measure of how lethal shootings in a city are than as a measure of that city’s overall level of gun violence. Asher collected shooting victim data for last year from 17 cities. Cincinnati is one of the most violent cities on the list, as measured by shootings, despite having comparatively few murders. Newark is the opposite: a city with more murders than its shooting rate would suggest. It appears that shootings in Baltimore and New Orleans tend to be more deadly than those in Chicago, contributing to the former two having consistently higher murder rates than Chicago. What isn’t clear is why. Answering this question would provide tremendous insight into the mechanics of gun violence in U.S. cities and could help cities devise strategies for lowering their murder rates. The question is hard to answer without more complete, more detailed data.

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

‘Social Contagion’ Study Shows Chicago Shooting Links

Many of Chicago’s 4,368 shootings last year follow a tit-for-tat pattern of vendetta between people who know each other. What if there was a way to anticipate that and break the chain? A new study says it’s possible to do that, reports CityLab. Researchers Ben Green and Thibaut Horel at Harvard and Andrew Papachristos at Yale […]

Many of Chicago’s 4,368 shootings last year follow a tit-for-tat pattern of vendetta between people who know each other. What if there was a way to anticipate that and break the chain? A new study says it’s possible to do that, reports CityLab. Researchers Ben Green and Thibaut Horel at Harvard and Andrew Papachristos at Yale used a “social contagion” model and tried to predict gunshot victimization in Chicago between 2006 and 2014. Using police records of people arrested together for the same offense, they mapped a network of 138,163 subjects and looked at the spread of violence within it. Their model, based on those that epidemiologists use to understand contagion, assumed that shootings were likely to spread between co-arrestees, who would have close social ties and engage in risky behavior together.

When they ran probabilities on people linked to a shooting victim, they found that 63 percent of the 11,123 total shootings in the network were part of a longer chain of gunshot victimization. The closer someone was to a victim, the greater the risk of being shot. “Gunshot violence follows an epidemic-like process of social contagion that is transmitted through networks of people by social interactions,” says the study, published by the Journal of the American Medical Association last month. The National Network for Safe Communities, based at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, relies on data like this to identify patterns of shooting and design concrete solutions that police and communities can carry out together, with a focus on minimizing the use of enforcement and offering help to those at risk. Shooting victimization is highly concentrated in small social networks. Another study by Papachristos showed that 70 percent of Chicago’s nonfatal gun violence victims between 2006 and 2014 were found among a network of less than 6 percent of the city’s population.

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Justices to Hear Case Over U.S. Agent’s Shooting in Mexico

Parents of teenager killed by U.S. agent whose bullet went over the U.S.-Mexico border contend that they should be able to sue the United States. A lower court said they could not.

The gun was fired in the U.S., but the bullet stopped 60 feet away in Mexico in the head of a 15-year-old boy named Sergio Adrián Hernández Güereca. Border patrol agent Jesus Mesa Jr. pulled the trigger six years ago in the wide concrete culvert that separates El Paso from Juarez, Mexico. Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will consider whether the Constitution gives Hernández’s parents the right to sue Mesa in U.S. courts for killing their son, the Washington Post reports. The hearing comes amid a time of increasing tension and controversy over how the U.S. polices the daily churn along the border, where essential international commerce takes place alongside narcotics trafficking and human smuggling.

Courts have struggled to deal with the national security and foreign policy implications of the case, and the Supreme Court’s precedents. If Hernández had been killed inside the U.S., the case could proceed. Or if he had been a U.S. citizen, it would not have mattered that Mesa was on one side of the border and he was on the other. The courts so far in Hernández’s case have said the Constitution does not reach across the border — even 60 feet — to give rights to those without a previous connection to the United States. To find otherwise, Judge Edith Jones wrote for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, would “create a breathtaking expansion of federal court authority … and would have severely adverse consequences for the conduct of American foreign affairs.” Attorneys for the parents say there must be recourse for killing an unarmed teenager playing with his friends. Halting the case before it is even tried, their brief tells the Supreme Court, erects “a legal no-man’s land in which federal agents can kill innocent civilians with impunity.”

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

“Stand Your Ground” Hearing Due in FL Movie Shooting

Two-week hearing to start on retired Tampa police officer Curtis Reeves’ attempt to win immunity from prosecution for fatally shooting movie theater patron who refused to turn off his phone.

Curtis Reeves, the man accused in the fatal 2014 shooting in a Florida movie theater, is due in court today for a hearing to determine if he should be immune from prosecution under Florida’s “stand your ground” law, the Tampa Bay Times reports. Reeves, a retired Tampa police officer, has argued that he was defending himself when he fired the single shot that killed 43-year-old Chad Oulson. The confrontation began after Reeves asked Oulson to turn off his phone during previews before the movie Lone Survivor.

Reeves’ attorneys say Oulson had begun to attack Reeves before he pulled the gun. Circuit Judge Susan Barthle will begin weighing whether Reeves should be immune from prosecution under “stand your ground.” The law says a person has no duty to retreat when faced with a violent confrontation and can use deadly force if he or she fears death or great bodily harm. If the judge rules otherwise, Reeves will head toward trial on a second-degree murder charge. The court has set aside two weeks in which attorneys will present evidence and question experts.

from http://thecrimereport.org