Police Strategies Reduce Crime-New Study

Observations The focus of this study is proactive policing (self-initiated efforts to reduce crime) versus traditional tactics such as responding to calls and routine patrol. The data indicate that most proactive police efforts reduce crime in the short run. Author  Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

Observations The focus of this study is proactive policing (self-initiated efforts to reduce crime) versus traditional tactics such as responding to calls and routine patrol. The data indicate that most proactive police efforts reduce crime in the short run. Author  Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Texas Shooter: Number of Accurate Criminal Records Is Staggeringly Low

Observations “According to the Department of Justice, the number of these records that are actually uploaded is staggeringly low…” ”Even the FBI acknowledges that its NCIC database is limited, noting that it contains only about 50 to 55 percent of all available criminal records…” Devin Kelley’s violent past went undocumented. He’s not the only one. […]

Observations “According to the Department of Justice, the number of these records that are actually uploaded is staggeringly low…” ”Even the FBI acknowledges that its NCIC database is limited, noting that it contains only about 50 to 55 percent of all available criminal records…” Devin Kelley’s violent past went undocumented. He’s not the only one. […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Daphne Caruana Galizia’s Murder and the Security of WhatsApp

Daphne Caruana Galizia was a Maltese journalist whose anti-corruption investigations exposed powerful people. She was murdered in October by a car bomb. Galizia used WhatsApp to communicate securely with her sources. Now that she is dead, the Maltese police want to break into her phone or the app, and find out who those sources were. One journalist reports: Part of…

Daphne Caruana Galizia was a Maltese journalist whose anti-corruption investigations exposed powerful people. She was murdered in October by a car bomb.

Galizia used WhatsApp to communicate securely with her sources. Now that she is dead, the Maltese police want to break into her phone or the app, and find out who those sources were.

One journalist reports:

Part of Daphne's destroyed smart phone was elevated from the scene.

Investigators say that Caruana Galizia had not taken her laptop with her on that particular trip. If she had done so, the forensic experts would have found evidence on the ground.

Her mobile phone is also being examined, as can be seen from her WhatsApp profile, which has registered activity since the murder. But it is understood that the data is safe.

Sources close to the newsroom said that as part of the investigation her sim card has been cloned. This is done with the help of mobile service providers in similar cases. Asked if her WhatsApp messages or any other messages that were stored in her phone will be retrieved, the source said that since the messaging application is encrypted, the messages cannot be seen. Therefore it is unlikely that any data can be retrieved.

I am less optimistic than that reporter. The FBI is providing "specific assistance." The article doesn't explain that, but I would not be surprised if they were helping crack the phone.

It will be interesting to see if WhatsApp's security survives this. My guess is that it depends on how much of the phone was recovered from the bombed car.

EDITED TO ADD (11/7): The court-appointed IT expert on the case has a criminal record in the UK for theft and forgery.

from https://www.schneier.com/blog/

St. Paul Police Union Accused of ‘Dog Whistle Racism’

St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman has called on the board of the Minnesota city’s Police Federation to resign amid allegations that the union’s criticism of a black mayoral candidate smacks of racism.

St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman and mayoral candidate Pat Harris called on the leadership of the Minnesota city’s police union to resign Thursday evening, decrying as racist the group’s recent criticism of Harris’ opponent Melvin Carter III, reports the Pioneer Press. The St. Paul Police Federation accused Carter, who is black, of doing too little to secure two handguns that were stolen from his home in an August burglary. The Police Federation has endorsed Harris in the race for mayor. The criticism was first aired Tuesday in a statement from the union and reiterated Thursday in a campaign mailer that suggested a link between the stolen guns and recent gun violence in St. Paul.

Echoing earlier statements from Carter’s campaign, Coleman and Harris separately criticized the “attacks” as racially motivated — a charge rejected by Police Federation President Dave Titus. “David Titus and the board of the Saint Paul Police Federation have embarrassed the good men and women of the Saint Paul Police Department for too long,” Coleman wrote on Facebook. “The racist attacks and hollow apologies of the last two days may have been aimed at one candidate, but they affect all people of color, and all people of character. They are not worthy of Saint Paul.” Later, Harris said in an emailed statement that “there is absolutely no place in Saint Paul for the type of dirty, political tactics and dog whistle racism that have come from the Saint Paul Police Federation’s leadership over the past few days.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

Are Police ‘Warning Shots’ Advisable? Chiefs Disagree

A new policy approved recently by a coalition of law enforcement groups endorses the use of warning shots by police to de-escalate potentially deadly confrontations. The controversial issue broke into the open this week during a national meeting of police executives in Philadelphia. “I think it’s a stupid idea,” said one attendee.

A new policy endorsing the use of warning shots by police to de-escalate potentially deadly confrontations is driving a rift among some law enforcement leaders who believe the practice only heightens risk and should be abandoned, reports USA Today. The controversy broke into the open during a gathering of the nation’s police chiefs this week in Philadelphia where some officials called for removing the provision allowing for warning shots contained in the National Consensus Policy on Use of Force. The policy paper was approved earlier this month by a coalition of police groups, including the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the largest society of top law enforcement officials in the country.

“I’ll be real candid: I think it’s a stupid idea,” said James Varrone, assistant police chief in Wilmington, N.C., who first raised the matter Sunday at a law enforcement town hall event staged to coincide with the IACP conference. “I thought the idea of warning shots and the dangers posed by such a policy went away decades ago.” Most police executives seemed to agree with Varrone. Terrence Cunningham, the IACP’s deputy executive director, acknowledged the charged nature of the provision but believed it should be included “for the most extreme situations.” Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, another of 11 law enforcement groups that collaborated on the policy, said the policy was promulgated as law enforcement has sought ways to avoid fatal encounters. He said, “We were responding to the growing drumbeat about the use of force around the country.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

Austin PD Contract Links 9.5% Raise to Accountability

Under the proposal, Austin cops would agree to expanded powers for the police monitor’s office and the Citizen Review Panel. A police watchdog group criticized the deal, saying contracts should not leverage accountability in exchange for money.

Austin police officers would get a 9.5 percent raise over five years under a proposed new contract in exchange for greater transparency and accountability, reports the city’s American-Statesman. Among other things, the contract would expand the deadlines for investigations of police misconduct and broaden the scope and power of the police monitor’s office and the Citizen Review Panel. Chas Moore, co-founder of watchdog group the Austin Justice Coalition, criticized the proposal, which he said leveraged accountability in exchange for more money. The police union defended the deal, citing the rising cost of living in Austin.

The City Council and police union must vote to approve the contract. “We have people testifying, saying, ‘Our kids want pools and parks. We want sidewalks. We want lights. We want better transit,’” Moore said. “But we don’t have the money, because we keep putting money into the Police Department.” Thirty-nine percent of the city’s general fund goes to the Austin Police Department. Under the current contract, new officers are paid a starting salary of $58,681 a year. By comparison, Dallas Police Department academy graduates have a starting salary of $49,207. The Houston Police Department’s starting salary is $49,917, and the San Antonio Police Department’s starting salary is $47,138.

from https://thecrimereport.org

The Science of Interrogation

Fascinating article about two psychologists who are studying interrogation techniques. Now, two British researchers are quietly revolutionising the study and practice of interrogation. Earlier this year, in a meeting room at the University of Liverpool, I watched a video of the Diola interview alongside Laurence Alison, the university’s chair of forensic psychology, and Emily Alison, a professional counsellor. My permission…

Fascinating article about two psychologists who are studying interrogation techniques.

Now, two British researchers are quietly revolutionising the study and practice of interrogation. Earlier this year, in a meeting room at the University of Liverpool, I watched a video of the Diola interview alongside Laurence Alison, the university's chair of forensic psychology, and Emily Alison, a professional counsellor. My permission to view the tape was negotiated with the counter-terrorist police, who are understandably wary of allowing outsiders access to such material. Details of the interview have been changed to protect the identity of the officers involved, though the quotes are verbatim.

The Alisons, husband and wife, have done something no scholars of interrogation have been able to do before. Working in close cooperation with the police, who allowed them access to more than 1,000 hours of tapes, they have observed and analysed hundreds of real-world interviews with terrorists suspected of serious crimes. No researcher in the world has ever laid hands on such a haul of data before. Based on this research, they have constructed the world's first empirically grounded and comprehensive model of interrogation tactics.

The Alisons' findings are changing the way law enforcement and security agencies approach the delicate and vital task of gathering human intelligence. "I get very little, if any, pushback from practitioners when I present the Alisons' work," said Kleinman, who now teaches interrogation tactics to military and police officers. "Even those who don't have a clue about the scientific method, it just resonates with them." The Alisons have done more than strengthen the hand of advocates of non-coercive interviewing: they have provided an unprecedentedly authoritative account of what works and what does not, rooted in a profound understanding of human relations. That they have been able to do so is testament to a joint preoccupation with police interviews that stretches back more than 20 years.

from https://www.schneier.com/blog/

Race and Violent Crime

Police Van Observation Half (51 percent) of violent victimizations from 2012 to 2015 were intraracial. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information […]

Police Van Observation Half (51 percent) of violent victimizations from 2012 to 2015 were intraracial. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

118 Law Enforcement Officers Killed-57,180 Officers Assaulted

Observations The number of officers killed as a result of criminal acts in 2016 increased by 25 when compared with the 41 officers who were feloniously killed in 2015. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior […]

Observations The number of officers killed as a result of criminal acts in 2016 increased by 25 when compared with the 41 officers who were feloniously killed in 2015. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Who’s Right on Crime?

Observations Antonin (Anthony) Scalia (deceased) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (current) were friends and Associate Justices for the U.S. Supreme Court. They were fierce ideological opponents. Both agreed that their friendship and willingness to debate made their Supreme Court decisions stronger, and their personal lives better. We need to move from argument winning to problem-solving. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five […]

Observations Antonin (Anthony) Scalia (deceased) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (current) were friends and Associate Justices for the U.S. Supreme Court. They were fierce ideological opponents. Both agreed that their friendship and willingness to debate made their Supreme Court decisions stronger, and their personal lives better. We need to move from argument winning to problem-solving. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net