The Petra Pazsitka Lost And Found Case

     In 1984, when 24-year-old Petra Pazsitka, a computer science student attending college in Braunschweig, Germany, failed to show up at her brother’s birthday party, her parents reported her missing. The police in this northern German…

     In 1984, when 24-year-old Petra Pazsitka, a computer science student attending college in Braunschweig, Germany, failed to show up at her brother's birthday party, her parents reported her missing. The police in this northern German city launched a massive hunt.

     About a year after the student's disappearance, the missing persons case was featured on a popular German television crime show. The public exposure did not create any tips that led to Pazsitka's recovery.

     Not long after the airing of the TV segment, a man named Gunter confessed to the rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl from the neighborhood where Pazsitka had disappeared. This man also confessed to kidnapping and murdering the missing college student. But after Gunter was unable to lead homicide investigators to Pazsitka's body, the suspect took back his confession and that case was closed.

     In 1989, five years after Pazsitka's disappearance, she was officially declared dead even though her body had not been recovered.

     In September 2015, police in Dusseldorf, Germany were called to an apartment to investigate a burglary. At the scene they spoke to the victim tenant, a 54-year-old woman who identified herself as Mrs. Schneider. Investigators, when they learned that Mrs. Schneider didn't possess a driver's license, social security card, passport, or bank account, or any other form of personal identification, turned their attention on her.

     As it turned out, Mrs. Schneider was Petra Pazsitka. After staging her disappearance 30 years ago, Pazsitka lived in several German cities under numerous assumed names. She paid all of her bills with cash and didn't drive a car.

     When detectives asked Pazsitka the obvious question of why she had voluntarily disappeared, causing a massive police hunt as well as pain and suffering for her family, she said she had wanted to start a new life. She offered no explanation beyond that. Her father had since died. When asked if she wanted to reunite with her mother and brother, she said she did not.

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Donthe Lucas Finally Arrested in Alleged Murder of Missing, Pregnant GF Kelsie Schelling

Reading from the Voice Media empire: Barely two weeks after Donthe Lucas was arrested on robbery charges, the former basketball star was served with an arrest warrant in the February 2013 disappearance of Kelsie Schelling, who vanished after telling her boyfriend, Lucas, that she was pregnant. The bust took place on the same day his mom, Sara Lucas, was taken into […]

The post Donthe Lucas Finally Arrested in Alleged Murder of Missing, Pregnant GF Kelsie Schelling appeared first on True Crime Report.

Reading from the Voice Media empire: Barely two weeks after Donthe Lucas was arrested on robbery charges, the former basketball star was served with an arrest warrant in the February 2013 disappearance of Kelsie Schelling, who vanished after telling her boyfriend, Lucas, that she was pregnant. The bust took place on the same day his mom, Sara Lucas, was taken into [...]

The post Donthe Lucas Finally Arrested in Alleged Murder of Missing, Pregnant GF Kelsie Schelling appeared first on True Crime Report.

from http://www.truecrimereport.com

Donthe Lucas Arrested — but Not for Missing Kelsie Schelling Case

Reading from the Voice Media empire:  Authorites recently conducted a new series of searches in the case of Kelsie Schelling, a 21-year-old who vanished more than four years ago after telling her boyfriend, Donthe Lucas, that she was pregnant. The searches focused on locations associated with Lucas, a person of interest in Schelling’s disappearance, and while they turned up no new […]

The post Donthe Lucas Arrested — but Not for Missing Kelsie Schelling Case appeared first on True Crime Report.

Reading from the Voice Media empire:  Authorites recently conducted a new series of searches in the case of Kelsie Schelling, a 21-year-old who vanished more than four years ago after telling her boyfriend, Donthe Lucas, that she was pregnant. The searches focused on locations associated with Lucas, a person of interest in Schelling’s disappearance, and while they turned up no new [...]

The post Donthe Lucas Arrested — but Not for Missing Kelsie Schelling Case appeared first on True Crime Report.

from http://www.truecrimereport.com

The Lisa Irwin Missing Person Case

     In Kansas City, Missouri, during the early morning hours of October 4, 2011, Jeremy Irwin told the police he had gone into his 10-month-old daughter’s room and found her missing from the crib. He said he had last seen the baby, Lisa Irwin, around 10:30 the previous night. When he arrived home from work the next morning (he worked the 11 PM to 3 AM shift), he found his front door unlocked and most of the inside lights on. He had also discovered, he said, an open front window, presumably the kidnapper’s point of entry.

     The missing baby’s mother, Deborah Bradley, at home that night, had put the baby to bed. She and her husband had not called the police immediately upon discovering the crime because, according to their stories, someone, presumably the intruder, had stolen their three cellphones. On Friday, October 7, 2011, Bradley, appearing on “The Today Show,” said that on Thursday the police had informed her she had failed a polygraph test. At that point the parents stopped cooperating with the authorities investigating the abduction of their daughter.  In the meantime, local police and FBI agents were searching for the missing child.

     According to the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire, during the past thirty years, 278 infants have gone missing. Only thirteen of these babies were abducted by intruders. Every year about 1,500 children are killed by their parents.

     It has not always been the case that babies stolen by strangers was a rarity. During the 1920s, kids from wealthy families were regularly kidnapped by organized racketeers who returned the children after receiving the ransom money. The families, relieved to have their infants back, rarely reported the crimes. The so-called “snatch racket” ended after the Lindbergh case in 1932. Following the intruder abduction of 20-month-old Charles Lindbergh, Jr., kidnapping became a federal offense investigated by the FBI. Today, kidnapping for ransom, committed by stupid people who almost always get caught when they show up for the ransom money, is a relatively uncommon crime.

     On October 18, 2011, while appearing on three national television shows, Deborah Bradley informed her interviewers that she was drunk and on anxiety medicine the night her baby was abducted. Perhaps she had blacked out. Bradley also changed her story as to when she last saw Lisa. She now said she last saw the infant at 6:40 PM. This meant the baby could have been snatched anytime between 6:40 PM and 4:00 AM the next morning.  She had also retained a celebrity defense attorney and had a private investigator working on the case.

     In January 2012, Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin appeared on the “Dr. Phil” television show. The mother pleaded with the abductor to return her child. “Nobody takes a baby to hurt her,” Bradley said. “She’s coming home.” The couple also reiterated their previous denials that they had anything to do with their daughter’s disappearance.

     A month after appearing on “Dr. Phil,” Bradley told an Associated Press reporter that, “She’s out there somewhere, and I am desperate to find her…I just want my daughter home. People don’t understand just how difficult it is to wake up and find out that someone has come into your house and taken your baby, and then you are accused of doing something to her or covering something up.”

     In early February 2012, detectives had their first interview with the couple since they questioned them on October 8, 2011. According to a spokesperson with the Kansas City Police Department, the interview didn’t produce anything new.

     Notwithstanding a $100,000 reward offered by an anonymous benefactor and the running down of 1,500 leads generated by the TIPS Hotline, Lisa Irwin’s whereabouts was still a mystery. As the volume of investigative tips faded, detectives returned to working on other cases.

     In December 2014, a former CIA interrogator questioned Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin and concluded they did not exhibit any behavioral signs of deception when they denied involvement in the disappearance of their daughter. However, many people familiar with the case, inside law enforcement and out, still considered Deborah Bradley a viable suspect who had not revealed everything she knew about what happened to Lisa Irwin. 

     In Kansas City, Missouri, during the early morning hours of October 4, 2011, Jeremy Irwin told the police he had gone into his 10-month-old daughter's room and found her missing from the crib. He said he had last seen the baby, Lisa Irwin, around 10:30 the previous night. When he arrived home from work the next morning (he worked the 11 PM to 3 AM shift), he found his front door unlocked and most of the inside lights on. He had also discovered, he said, an open front window, presumably the kidnapper's point of entry.

     The missing baby's mother, Deborah Bradley, at home that night, had put the baby to bed. She and her husband had not called the police immediately upon discovering the crime because, according to their stories, someone, presumably the intruder, had stolen their three cellphones. On Friday, October 7, 2011, Bradley, appearing on "The Today Show," said that on Thursday the police had informed her she had failed a polygraph test. At that point the parents stopped cooperating with the authorities investigating the abduction of their daughter.  In the meantime, local police and FBI agents were searching for the missing child.

     According to the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire, during the past thirty years, 278 infants have gone missing. Only thirteen of these babies were abducted by intruders. Every year about 1,500 children are killed by their parents.

     It has not always been the case that babies stolen by strangers was a rarity. During the 1920s, kids from wealthy families were regularly kidnapped by organized racketeers who returned the children after receiving the ransom money. The families, relieved to have their infants back, rarely reported the crimes. The so-called "snatch racket" ended after the Lindbergh case in 1932. Following the intruder abduction of 20-month-old Charles Lindbergh, Jr., kidnapping became a federal offense investigated by the FBI. Today, kidnapping for ransom, committed by stupid people who almost always get caught when they show up for the ransom money, is a relatively uncommon crime.

     On October 18, 2011, while appearing on three national television shows, Deborah Bradley informed her interviewers that she was drunk and on anxiety medicine the night her baby was abducted. Perhaps she had blacked out. Bradley also changed her story as to when she last saw Lisa. She now said she last saw the infant at 6:40 PM. This meant the baby could have been snatched anytime between 6:40 PM and 4:00 AM the next morning.  She had also retained a celebrity defense attorney and had a private investigator working on the case.

     In January 2012, Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin appeared on the "Dr. Phil" television show. The mother pleaded with the abductor to return her child. "Nobody takes a baby to hurt her," Bradley said. "She's coming home." The couple also reiterated their previous denials that they had anything to do with their daughter's disappearance.

     A month after appearing on "Dr. Phil," Bradley told an Associated Press reporter that, "She's out there somewhere, and I am desperate to find her…I just want my daughter home. People don't understand just how difficult it is to wake up and find out that someone has come into your house and taken your baby, and then you are accused of doing something to her or covering something up."

     In early February 2012, detectives had their first interview with the couple since they questioned them on October 8, 2011. According to a spokesperson with the Kansas City Police Department, the interview didn't produce anything new.

     Notwithstanding a $100,000 reward offered by an anonymous benefactor and the running down of 1,500 leads generated by the TIPS Hotline, Lisa Irwin's whereabouts was still a mystery. As the volume of investigative tips faded, detectives returned to working on other cases.

     In December 2014, a former CIA interrogator questioned Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin and concluded they did not exhibit any behavioral signs of deception when they denied involvement in the disappearance of their daughter. However, many people familiar with the case, inside law enforcement and out, still considered Deborah Bradley a viable suspect who had not revealed everything she knew about what happened to Lisa Irwin. 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Kelsie Schelling Search: New Hope, New Leads

Reading from the Voice Media empire: In recent days, authorized renewed a search for Kelsie Schelling, a 21-year-old woman who went missing more than four years ago after learning she was pregnant. The latest operation, prompted by what are described as new leads, continued increased activity over recent months and follows an apparent attempt to burn down the home of Donthe […]

The post Kelsie Schelling Search: New Hope, New Leads appeared first on True Crime Report.

Reading from the Voice Media empire: In recent days, authorized renewed a search for Kelsie Schelling, a 21-year-old woman who went missing more than four years ago after learning she was pregnant. The latest operation, prompted by what are described as new leads, continued increased activity over recent months and follows an apparent attempt to burn down the home of Donthe [...]

The post Kelsie Schelling Search: New Hope, New Leads appeared first on True Crime Report.

from http://www.truecrimereport.com

How to Tackle the Nation’s Missing Persons Challenge

A federally funded database called NamUs provides free forensic and analytical resources for missing, unidentified and unclaimed person cases. But unless all states make it mandatory for use by local authorities, its full potential won’t be realized, say three Florida researchers.

On any given day in the United States, there are close to 100,000 active missing persons entries in the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database.

Approximately 4,400 unidentified human remains will be recovered every year, on top of the 40,000 that currently exist nationally.

These numbers are only estimates, because there has not been a national endeavor to locate and track unidentified decedents from years past. Many of these cases slipped through the cracks because they either were never entered in NCIC or investigative efforts ended prematurely—or both—which means that many victims have been cremated or are lying in unmarked graves.

These long-term cases are often fraught with errors, as science and investigative methods have changed over the decades. The degree to which old cases are updated to current standards is highly variable across jurisdictions.

Erin Kimmerle

This has generated an enormous problem: The number of missing and unidentified persons is beyond the capability of the majority of law enforcement and medical examiners/coroners to identify these individuals and reunite them with their families.

In order to help solve these cases, there are a number of tools and resources in place, but one of the most effective is the federally funded program called NamUs, which provides an invaluable, free resource that has been proven to work.

NamUs, an acronym for the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, operated by the National Institute of Justice, is a resource center housing a database of missing persons and unidentified decedent records across the U.S.

It comprises three databases: The Missing Persons Database, the Unidentified Persons Database and the Unclaimed Persons Database.

Thomas McAndrew

In addition to being a data clearing-house, NamUs provides free forensic and analytical resources for missing, unidentified and unclaimed person cases. It’s a free online system that can be searched by medical examiners, coroners, law enforcement officials and the general public (including victim’s families) from all over the country in hopes of resolving these cases.

When a new missing person or unidentified decedent case is entered into NamUs, the system automatically performs cross-matching comparisons between the databases, searching for matches or similarities among cases. The system also has an advanced search feature that allows for public users as well as law enforcement, medical examiners and coroners to locate potential matches based on unique features, such as scars, marks, tattoos, jewelry, skeletal or biometric information, and other physical descriptions.

But the system can accomplish so much more if it is used to its fullest potential.

Currently, the use of this tool is voluntary. In Florida, for example the NCIC lists 3,233 missing persons and 783 unidentified persons. However, the NamUs system reports only 1,086 missing cases and exceeds NCIC with 870 unidentified person’s cases.

James Markey

These cases will only be solved if we know who we are looking for and if all available resources and tools are deployed to ensure each case has its best chance at being solved.

Many medical examiner and coroner’s offices around the country do not have access to NCIC. Having an online database is therefore crucial. The public user interface brings awareness and rejuvenates cold cases for possible new leads. It provides free resources and services for cases in NamUs that would not otherwise be available to some agencies.

The public user interface is also a successful tool for families searching for their loved ones based on unique characteristics. The different access levels for public and criminal justice personnel allow for detailed investigative notes and the results of forensic analysis to be hidden from public view.

It offers internet accessibility and ease of use for all users as it streamlines case management by serving as a single source for all case information and digital images. Comprehensive case reports and Missing Person Posters are accessible to print out and customized per user type. Geo-mapping helps to find the closest resources available. Geo-mapping is also available for cases that are returned as a result of an advanced search.

 And it’s cost-efficient.

Some have argued that this tool creates a burden for busy and resource-strapped investigators. But it is actually a tool that helps save time and money by solving cases. The free resources available include training on how to use NamUs and technical support for adding entries.

NamUs is currently undergoing a re-build/upgrade into the NamUs 2.0 system. The upgrade will have a mechanism to allow for data exchange between agencies and in some instances even state databases. Data exchange between NamUs and NCIC is prohibited by federal legislation that the FBI must follow with regard to the data contained in the NCIC system.

Therefore, the only current way to ensure effective use of the NamUs Program – for all users to help solve cases—is for each agency to enter its own cases. NCIC data is limited in nature compared to NamUs data fields and therefore a case will still need enhancements once imported from NCIC.

These barriers need to be addressed. All law enforcement agencies and medical examiners/coroners should be required by law and/or state policy to use NamUs for long-term Missing and Unidentified individuals.

New York, Ohio, Connecticut, and Tennessee already have state laws requiring the use of NamUs. California’s Penal Code states that the clearinghouse must share data with NamUs. There are similar proposals in other states as well, but all state legislatures should be concerned that missing- and unidentified-persons cases have their best chance at being solved.

At a minimum, effective legislation should require:

  • that human remains of unknown unidentified persons are not destroyed (i.e. cremated);
  • that biometric data is collected and tested to aid with identification; and
  • that the NamUs entries be mandatory.

Furthermore, in regards to long-term missing person cases, law enforcement should be required to obtain family reference samples for entry into the national DNA database.

If the systems that have been put in place are used to their fullest potential, the unidentified stand a much better chance of being given back their name.

Erin Kimmerle, PhD. Thomas C. McAndrew, M.A.,and James Markey, M.Ed. are co-founders of TANC (Time to Address the Nation’s Cold Cases), a think tank dedicated to addressing policy issues related to unresolved violent crime investigations. Kimmerle and McAndrew are on the faculty of the Florida Institute for Forensic Anthropology & Applied Sciences at the University of South Florida. Markey is a retired Phoenix police officer on appointment to the University of South Florida. To learn more, please visit www.forensics.usf.edu or visit their blog at www.coldcasetanc.blogspot.com. Readers comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Seth Kienzle’s Disappearance Growing More Mysterious By the Day

Reading from the Voice Media empire: Seth Kienzle disappeared on February 19, 2016, More than a year later, he remains missing, and one of Kienzle’s longtime friends, who’s frustrated by the decision of law enforcement to stop searching for him based on a theory she doubts, is sharing his story in the hope of finally solving a mystery that […]

The post Seth Kienzle’s Disappearance Growing More Mysterious By the Day appeared first on True Crime Report.

Reading from the Voice Media empire: Seth Kienzle disappeared on February 19, 2016, More than a year later, he remains missing, and one of Kienzle’s longtime friends, who’s frustrated by the decision of law enforcement to stop searching for him based on a theory she doubts, is sharing his story in the hope of finally solving a mystery that [...]

The post Seth Kienzle’s Disappearance Growing More Mysterious By the Day appeared first on True Crime Report.

from http://www.truecrimereport.com

The Guma Aguiar Missing Person Case

     Guma Aguiar’s parents immigrated to the United States from Brazil in 1979 when he was two-years-old. The family, from Rio deJaneiro, settled in Pompano Beach, Florida. After college, Guma, a born-again Christian, moved to Texas wher…

     Guma Aguiar's parents immigrated to the United States from Brazil in 1979 when he was two-years-old. The family, from Rio deJaneiro, settled in Pompano Beach, Florida. After college, Guma, a born-again Christian, moved to Texas where, working with his uncle in the oil and gas business, he made a fortune.

     In 2012, the 35-year-old millionaire was living in Fort Lauderdale with his wife Jamie and their four children. The family resided in a $5 million, six-bedroom mansion located in the exclusive oceanside  neighborhood called Rio Vista.

     Aguiar, after converting to Orthodox Judaism, began donating millions of dollars to charitable causes in Jerusalem where he was considered a hero philanthropist. Others considered Aguiar a rich, eccentric man who was losing touch with reality. (Aguiar, according to reports, had spent some time in mental wards. I do not know the extent or nature of his mental health problem.) His marriage to Jamie, whom he'd met in high school, had become a tumultuous relationship. On one occasion he had sued Jamie for divorce, then later withdrew the petition. In April 2012, Jamie Aguiar's attorney challenged the prenuptial agreement she had signed. The following month, Guma transferred guardianship of his $100 million estate ("in the event of my incapacity") from his wife Jamie to his mother, Ellen Aguiar. This, too, was challenged by Jamie's legal representatives.

     On June 18, 2012, Jamie Aguiar informed Guma that she intended to file for divorce. An hour later, at 8:30 in the evening, Guma was seen driving his twin-engine, fiberglass powerboat "T.T. Zion" through Port Everglades toward the Atlantic Ocean. Just after midnight, employees of a beachfront bar called Elbo Room spotted a boat in rough seas drifting toward the beach. The craft came to rest on shore with its navigation lights still on, the shifter in gear, and the keys in the ignition. Guma Aguiar was not in the boat.

     That morning, while investigators searched Aguiar's boat, the Coast Guard launched a search-and-rescue operation. Inside the abandoned craft, officers recovered the owner's wallet, his iPhone, a black T-shirt, and a pair of flip-flops. According to the boat's GPS system, Aguilar had traveled at high speeds two miles northeast of his house before the craft turned around and started drifting back to the shore. Aguiar had left his wedding ring at home.

     After three days, the Coast Guard called off the search-and-rescue mission. Several weeks after Guma's disappearance, Jamie, engaged in a battle against her mother-in-law for control of the $100 million estate, fired her missing husband's chief financial officer. At this point in the case, everybody had a lawyer which was costing the family $1 million a month in legal fees. (In big money disputes like this, the lawyers are always the big winners. When they're finished with the case, there usually isn't much left for anyone else.) The Rio Vista mansion has been put on the market along with Aguiar's 75-foot yacht, and his twin-engine powerboat.

     So, what happened to Guma Aguiar? Did he go out for a quick swim and drown? (Did taking an evening swim in the ocean by himself conform to past behavior?) Did mental illness and a hatred for his wife drive Guma to suicide? Assuming he went into the sea, was it unusual that the Coast Guard searchers didn't find his body? Why hadn't his corpse washed up on shore somewhere in this populated area?  Could he be alive?

     Jamie Aguiar's attorney told reporters that he believed that Guma, after faking his own death, fled to the Netherlands where he was hiding out, or living under a false identity. The attorney suspected that Guma was in the Netherlands because a close business associate of his had recently relocated there.

     On December 29, 2015, a judge in Broward County declared Guma Aguiar legally deceased. This paved the way for the settlement of his estate. A court in Israel where Aguiar owned property will decide whether to accept the Florida court ruling.
 
      I think it's unlikely that Guma Aguiar faked his own death, then disappeared into thin air. It seems to me the money trail would lead investigators right to him. I think he either downed accidentally or committed suicide. The history of mental illness points to suicide, but statistics suggest a downing accident. (Eighty percent of all drownings are accidental.) I'm sure there are some who believe this Florida millionaire was murdered. There doesn't seem to be evidence of foul play in this case--blood on the boat and so on-- but anything is possible when a lot of money is involved.

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Missing Austin Cop Faked Suicide and Fled to Mexico

Police mounted a massive search last week when Officer Coleman Martin, 29, texted his wife a suicide note. But he was tracked down in Mexico after he emailed another woman that his staged suicide had worked.

An Austin police officer who was originally reported missing is believed to have attempted to fake his own death and to have fled to Mexico, reports the American-Statesman. Officer Coleman Martin, 29, is facing a misdemeanor charge of making a false report. Martin’s wife told KVUE-TV that the cop’s odd behavior was related to a new prescription medication.”The side effects were causing him to be depressed and think irrationally,” she said. “We want him to know his family loves him unconditionally and wants him home safe.”

An arrest affidavit for the missing officer said a woman, who was not his wife, shared an email with detectives in which Martin wrote to her and said his plan for a staged death had been successful. The affidavit does not say how the woman knows Martin. The email said he had staged a scene by parking his vehicle by a body of water near the U.S.-Mexican border. He then rode a bus into Mexico. Police got involved last Tuesday when Martin’s wife called 911 to report that he had texted her a photo of a suicide handwritten note. Authorities mounted a massive search, but by Thursday the missing cop’s email to the unnamed woman cast the case in a difference light.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Was Anyone Responsible For Avonte Oquendo’s Death?

     Avonte Oquendo, an autistic 14-year-old who didn’t speak, attended school in Long Island City, Queens, New York. The black, five-foot-three, 120 pound student was enrolled in the school’s special needs program. He lived with his mot…

     Avonte Oquendo, an autistic 14-year-old who didn't speak, attended school in Long Island City, Queens, New York. The black, five-foot-three, 120 pound student was enrolled in the school's special needs program. He lived with his mother, Vanessa Fontaine, a social services case manager, and his four older brothers aged 19 to 29. Avonte's school sits on a busy street across from a playground, a dog run, and a jogging path that overlooks the East River.

     At 12:40 PM on October 4, 2013, a school surveillance camera caught Avonte coming out of the building with other school kids. That was the last time anyone saw him. Reacting to the missing persons report filed by his mother, dozens of New York City police officers from the 102 Precinct, aided by two helicopters, conducted a thorough search of the neighborhood.

     Following the initial surge of police activity on the case, Avonte's mother Vanessa, working out of a donated recreational vehicle parked in front of the school, oversaw the deployment of volunteer searchers and the distribution of missing person fliers.

     Vanessa Fontaine also organized candlelight vigils and rallies, raised $95,000 in reward money from anonymous donors, and appeared on several nationally broadcast television programs. While the police received hundreds of tips, nothing panned out.

     Two months after her son's disappearance, Vanessa moved her operation out of the RV and set up shop in a rented office. Thirty days after that, with still no leads on Avonte's whereabouts, activity on the case waned. There were fewer tips coming in, and only a handful of volunteers showed up each day at Vanessa's missing persons headquarters.

     The missing boy's mother filed a $25 million lawsuit against New York City's Board of Education. The plaintiff accused the staff at Avonte's school of failing to protect him.

     On Thursday night, January 16, 2014, body parts and items of clothing found near the Queens shoreline. The remains were later identified as the missing boy's. The search was over and a new phase of the case, determining Oquendo's cause and manner of death, was underway.

     In March 2014, Richard Condon, the school system's "Special Commissioner of Investigation," sent a 12-page report regarding the Oquendo case to the Queen's District Attorney's Office. The report did not allege that any crime had occurred and did not recommend that any school employee should be disciplined.

     As a criminal matter the Oquendo case was closed. Apparently the official manner of the boy's drowning went into the books as accidental. To this date no one from the school has been held accountable for the autistic teenager's fate. The lawsuit, as of April 2017, remains unresolved. 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/