Ex-Judge Napolitano Off Fox After Obama Spying Claim

Fox commentator Andrew Napolitano, a former New Jersey judge, asserted that the British foreign surveillance service, known as GCHQ, provided former President Obama with transcripts of wiretapped calls made by Donald Trump. The British agency denied the charge.

Fox News has benched legal analyst Andrew Napolitano because of his claims that former President Obama used British intelligence officials to spy on President Trump, reports the New York Daily News. Napolitano, a former New Jersey Superior Court judge, reported last week that three intelligence sources had told him that Obama went “outside the chain of command” in order to surveil the President. “Obama would not have needed a warrant to authorize surveillance on Trump,” Napolitano wrote in a column for Fox News. “Sources have told me that the British foreign surveillance service, the Government Communications Headquarters, known as GCHQ, most likely provided Obama with transcripts of Trump’s calls.”

White House spokesman Sean Spicer cited the claim last week, while the Government Communications Headquarters called the accusations “utterly ridiculous.” Fox News anchor Shepard Smith said on the air that the network couldn’t confirm Napolitano’s report. “Fox News knows of no evidence of any kind that the now-president of the United States was surveilled at any time, in any way, full stop,” he said Friday. On the same day, Trump praised Napolitano as a “very talented legal mind.” FBI Director James Comey told the House Intelligence Committee yesterday denied the President’s Twitter accusation that Obama had wiretapped Trump Tower during the campaign. “I have no information that supports those tweets and we have looked carefully inside the FBI,” Comey said.

from http://thecrimereport.org

Angry-Frustrated Cops-New Data From Pew

Observations About half of the officers surveyed (51%) say their work nearly always (10%) or often (41%) makes them feel frustrated. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

Observations About half of the officers surveyed (51%) say their work nearly always (10%) or often (41%) makes them feel frustrated. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Trump Berates Jewish Journo Who Asked About Hate Crimes

Jake Turx was trying to ask the president about a frightening wave of coordinated bomb threats at Jewish venues. Trump stopped Turx, saying it was “not a fair question.” Instead of addressing the question, Trump declared himself “the least anti-Semitic person that you’ve ever seen in your entire life.”

Jake Turx, a correspondent for an Orthodox Jewish magazine in Brooklyn, was berated by Donald Trump at a news conference Thursday while trying to ask the president about a wave of bomb threats last month at Jewish venues. Trump stopped Turx, saying it was “not a fair question.” “Sit down,” the president commanded. Trump said, “So here’s the story, folks. No. 1, I am the least anti-Semitic person that you’ve ever seen in your entire life. No. 2, racism, the least racist person.”

But Turx was not accusing Trump of anti-Semitism, reports the New York Times. It was a legitimate inquiry about coordinated telephone bomb threats on three separate January days to Jewish synagogues, community centers and schools across the country that led to evacuations and FBI investigations. The Anti-Defamation League responded, “It is mind-boggling why President Trump prefers to shout down a reporter or brush this off as a political distraction.” Turx told the Times, “Regretfully, today was a day I wish we could have done over.”

from http://thecrimereport.org

Crime, Justice, the Media (and Donald Trump)

Urban violence, police shootings, the opioid epidemic, and a tense political campaign dominated criminal justice coverage during 2016. How did the coverage measure up? And what was overlooked? As journalists gather in NYC today for this year’s John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America, TCR publishes our annual press review.

For the first time in two decades, much of the news media coverage of criminal justice in a national election year focused on politics.

Crime issues were prominent in both of Bill Clinton’s campaigns for president in the 1990s. But it wasn’t until Donald Trump made “law and order” a theme during his 2016 campaign that crime emerged as a high-profile issue in the race for the White House.

Because crime is primarily a state and local concern, the national campaigns of Trump, Hillary Clinton, and competitors for their parties’ nominations inevitably touched on issues that already had commanded media attention during the year.

Those included crime increases in many big cities, a continued focus on shootings by police, broader issues of police reform, and a crisis in opioid overdoses. Getting somewhat less attention from the media were perennial issues like gun control and prison reform.

Much of this analysis is based on print and online media, but a snapshot of what captured media attention can be seen in the compilation by Andrew Tyndall of the top ten stories covered by the three major broadcast networks’ nightly newscasts, based on the number of minutes they consumed.

They were: the gay night club massacre in Orlando; the killing of five police officers in Dallas; gun control; the killing of a man by a Charlotte police officer; the murders of police officers in Baton Rouge; Chicago violence; routine police stops that ended in violence; follow-ups on the Charleston, S.C. church massacre; ambushes of police officers generally;, and the capture of drug lord “El Chapo” Guzman.

Ted Gest

TCR’s annual analysis of media criminal justice coverage is based in part on a conference call conducted by Criminal Justice Journalists on February 1, 2017, with James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University, William Freivogel of Southern Illinois University and the Gateway Journalism Review, and Marea Mannion, a senior lecturer in journalism at Penn State’s College of Communications, with contributions from Brandt Williams of Minnesota Public Radio.

It is supported with a grant from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, and published to coincide with the 12th annual John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America, which opens today.

Read the full report here.

 Ted Gest is president of Criminal Justice Journalists, and a co-founder and Washington bureau Chief of The Crime Report.

 

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Patriotic or Political Hit? Flynn Slant Depends on News Prism

Two narratives have emerged on the forced resignation of Michael Flynn as national security adviser. The traditional media suggested he was being held accountable. The right-leaning media portrayed it as a political crucifixion. Trump blames government leaks and the media.

In the hours since Michael T. Flynn resigned as national security adviser late Monday, two narratives have emerged, reports the New York Times. One, embraced by many in the traditional legacy media, centered on what Flynn had done that led to his resignation: discussed sanctions against Russia in a conversation with the Russian ambassador, and then misled Vice President Mike Pence about it. The other, which developed among the more right-leaning news media, focused on the leaks from Washington that had put pressure on Flynn to step aside, and whether these leaks were intended to damage President Trump.

One narrative holds Flynn, and others who knew about his discussions, accountable. The other portrays Flynn more as a victim. (On Wednesday morning, Trump jumped into the fray with a series of tweets condemning the leaks.) The rift between the mainstream media and more partisan news organizations has grown starker in the nearly four weeks since Trump took office, reflecting a widening political and ideological rift. The growing division means that some readers are getting their news through an ever-narrowing prism.

from http://thecrimereport.org

White House Says Media Fail to Report Terrorism

The White House issues a list of 78 incidents, including in Orlando and San Bernadino, it says were reported inadequately. “In many cases, the very, very dishonest press doesn’t want to report” on terrorism, asserts President Trump.

The White House released a list of 78 terrorist attacks “executed or inspired” by the Islamic State group that it claims support President Trump’s assertion that media organizations are deliberately failing to report adequately, says USA Today. “You’ve seen what happened in Paris and Nice. All over Europe it’s happening. It’s gotten to a point where it’s not even being reported,” Trump told military leaders and troops at U.S. Central Command headquarters in Tampa. “And in many cases, the very, very dishonest press doesn’t want to report it. They have their reasons and you understand that.”

Trump did not explain what he meant by “their reasons.” White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer subsequently clarified Trump’s remarks by telling reporters that it wasn’t that there was no reporting on terrorist attacks, but that there was insufficient reporting. “Protests will get blown out of the water, and yet an attack or a foiled attack doesn’t necessarily get the same coverage,” Spicer said. The list distributed by the White House included high-profile incidents in Paris, Nice, Orlando, and San Bernardino, Ca. that received widespread media coverage, as well as more obscure incidents in which police officers and security guards were injured but nobody was killed. The 78 domestic and international attacks cited took place between September 2014 and December 2016, although there was no explanation as to what merited inclusion on the list. There was no mention, for example, of terrorist attacks in Israel. “The real point here is that these terrorists attacks are so pervasive at this point that they do not spark the wall-to-wall coverage they once did,” said White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters.

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Why Judge’s Travel Ban Ruling Was Televised

The Washington state federal court is one of three still experimenting with cameras in the courtroom. Judge James Robart also was televised in a “black lives matter” police use of force case.

Camera-shy federal judges are rarely seen announcing decisions on television. Viewers online and on television saw Seattle U.S. District Judge James Robart announcing that he was halting President Trump’s immigrant travel ban. (Click here for video.)  By happenstance, his court is one of only three federal courts that extended a cameras-in-court pilot program that expired in 2015, reports the National Law Journal. Last year the U.S. Judicial Conference continued the camera ban. It allowed three courts (in Washington state, California and Guam) to continue allowing cameras to provide longer-term data about the pros and cons of camera access.

Robart also presided over United States v. Seattle, a case involving alleged excessive use of force by Seattle police. On six occasions, video of the proceedings was released, including last year’s session in which he made headlines by stating, “Black lives matter.” Now, with the even wider broadcast of Robart’s hearing and decision on the travel ban, the Judicial Conference will have a high-profile example of camera access to determine whether cameras are good or bad. Gabe Roth of Fix the Court, which advocates greater transparency in federal courts, said the broadcast of Robart’s proceedings “conveys its gravity through a medium that a majority of people—young and old, via online video or the evening news—get their information. As the judicial branch’s role in holding the republic together grows, other federal courts should follow the [Washington federal court’s] lead.”

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Kidnapped Amanda Berry to Do TV Reports

Berry, who was held captive for a decade before she escaped in 2013, will do a daily report on a Cleveland television station providing details about a missing person from Northeast Ohio.

Amanda Berry, who was held captive for 10 years in Cleveland, will report on missing people and contribute features to WJW Channel 8’s newscasts in the city, reports the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The first of her daily reports airs next week. Describing herself as “happy and healthy” during an appearance on the station yesterday, Berry said she is doing the reports because, “I want to give people hope.”

Abducted in 2003 and held captive for 10 years by Ariel Castro, Berry and two other kidnapped women, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight, escaped on May 6, 2013. Berry’s primary duty at Channel 8 will be as host of the daily “Missing” feature. The segment reports the identity and provides details about a missing person from Northeast Ohio. A different missing person will be featured each day, Monday through Friday, with Berry’s “Missing” report airing on newscasts throughout the day. Berry will tell the individual story and circumstances of the missing person and how viewers can assist in helping local authorities find him or her. Castro, who was sentenced to life imprisonment plus 1,000 years, without the chance of parole, hanged himself in his prison cell in 2013.

from http://thecrimereport.org

‘APB’ Crime Drama a ‘True Chicago Police Show’

In new FOX TV drama, a billionaire tech guru who is deeply affected by violent crime buys a troubled, crime-ridden police precinct in Chicago and reboots it as a private police force.

Austin Kirk says shooting his new Fox TV crime drama “APB” in Chicago “is very appropriate,” reports the Chicago Sun-Times. The actor adds, “While Chicago’s crime statistics only add to all that, doing a true Chicago police show in 2017 is certainly a lot to shoulder for all of us involved with ‘APB,’ ” the actor says. “There are many stories to tell there, and I hope we do it in an accurate and consistent way.” Kirk plays Gideon Reeves, a billionaire tech guru who is deeply affected by a violent crime that takes the life of his business partner and best friend. In the aftermath, Reeves comes up with an intriguing concept: He’ll buy a troubled, crime-ridden police precinct in Chicago and reboot it as a private police force.

“I like the possibilities of this situation,” Kirk says. “You can think this is a novel and perhaps great new idea on how to battle crime. Yet, on the other hand, you might go, ‘Oh, wait, maybe this isn’t such a good idea to give that kind of power to one individual.’ ” Producers of the show, which premiered last night, took the liberty of casting as the mayor an actor (Nestor Serrano) whose demeanor — if not exact physicality — is somewhat reminiscent of Chicago’s own Rahm Emanuel. “APB” executive producer Trey Callaway, a longtime producer on “CSI: New York,” has given a lot of thought to the conflicts between police and the communities they serve. “Of course, the show addresses issues that are specific to Chicago,” he says. “But we also frequently deal with some wider, systemic issues that we’re all aware of across the country. There is clearly a crisis in policing today.”

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Is Negative Media Coverage of Cops Hurting Crime Control?

Subtitles Pew: There is a widespread feeling among officers that police are mistreated by the media. Pew: About eight-in-ten officers (81%) say the media generally treat the police unfairly. Author By Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of supervising public affairs for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the […]

Subtitles Pew: There is a widespread feeling among officers that police are mistreated by the media. Pew: About eight-in-ten officers (81%) say the media generally treat the police unfairly. Author By Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of supervising public affairs for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net