Critical Messaging Sheets: A Guide to Developing Messaging That Resonates

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more … Continue reading

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more complex—especially for law enforcement professionals. Law enforcement personnel are often expected to discuss and respond to sensitive topics with an unrivaled level of speed, transparency, and sensitivity.

Every day, agencies around the world rise to the challenge, but not without using up-to-date facts and strategically-structured language. Seeing the need for a single, online resource that brings together these elements, the IACP created messaging worksheets for its members. These worksheets contain information about a wide range of issues, suggestions on talking-points, and guidance on how to structure a message that’s effective.

Currently, worksheets are available on the following topics:

  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Community-Police Relations
  • Encryption/Going Dark
  • Firearms: Background Checks
  • Fire Arms Security, Training and Investigation
  • Marijuana Legalization and Traffic Safety
  • Mental Health Response
  • Naloxone
  • Reducing Incarceration
  • Use of Force
  • Use of Military Equipment

To access the worksheets, visit the Critical Issues Webpage or explore your topic of interest. Messaging worksheets are a member-only benefit.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Critical Messaging Sheets: A Guide to Developing Messaging That Resonates

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more … Continue reading

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more complex—especially for law enforcement professionals. Law enforcement personnel are often expected to discuss and respond to sensitive topics with an unrivaled level of speed, transparency, and sensitivity.

Every day, agencies around the world rise to the challenge, but not without using up-to-date facts and strategically-structured language. Seeing the need for a single, online resource that brings together these elements, the IACP created messaging worksheets for its members. These worksheets contain information about a wide range of issues, suggestions on talking-points, and guidance on how to structure a message that’s effective.

Currently, worksheets are available on the following topics:

  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Community-Police Relations
  • Encryption/Going Dark
  • Firearms: Background Checks
  • Fire Arms Security, Training and Investigation
  • Marijuana Legalization and Traffic Safety
  • Mental Health Response
  • Naloxone
  • Reducing Incarceration
  • Use of Force
  • Use of Military Equipment

To access the worksheets, visit the Critical Issues Webpage or explore your topic of interest. Messaging worksheets are a member-only benefit.

from https://theiacpblog.org

No-Cost, Customized Technical Assistance: the CRI-TAC is Here to Help

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where … Continue reading

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where you are, and they stand ready to help you develop solutions. This is where the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), formed through a partnership between the IACP and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (the COPS Office), comes in.

The CRI-TAC provides a variety of services to law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. The CRI-TAC is focused on the concept of by the field, for the field. You receive assistance from the CRI-TAC’s cadre of subject matter experts, offering peer-to-peer consultation, training, planning, and more to help your agency reach the forefront of cutting-edge innovation and evidence-based practices.

Built to meet the diverse needs of law enforcement agencies, the CRI-TAC is:

  • Comprehensive. The CRI-TAC provides access to the combined experience and resources of the IACP and eight leading law enforcement organizations: Fraternal Order of Police, Major Cities Chiefs Association, FBI National Academy Associates, International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training, National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, and National Tactical Officers Association.
  • Collaborative. The CRI-TAC is founded on the philosophy that local involvement and accountability ensure agencies can meet the needs and expectations of their communities.
  • Customized. The CRI-TAC knows that a policy or training that worked for one agency might not work for yours, so the CRI-TAC team will work with you to develop solutions tailored to your agency.

If you are interested in innovative and expert solutions, if you want to play an active role in the problem-solving process, and if you would like the opportunity to tailor a large variety of resources to your agency, then request assistance from the CRI-TAC today.

Requesting assistance from the CRI-TAC is as simple as clicking a button or sending an email. Visit the CRI-TAC website and click the “Request Technical Assistance” button, or simply email CRITAC@theIACP.org. Tell us what makes your agency unique, such as size and location, and what your challenges are. The CRI-TAC team will focus on listening to you to develop a clear idea of your expectations, needs, and desired services. From there, they will work with you to develop an action plan and deliver the technical assistance solution you need.

Learn more about the CRI-TAC and request assistance on the CRI-TAC website, or email CRITAC@theIACP.org. You can also call the IACP at 800.THE.IACP and ask to speak to one of the CRI-TAC staff.

from https://theiacpblog.org

No-Cost, Customized Technical Assistance: the CRI-TAC is Here to Help

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where … Continue reading

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where you are, and they stand ready to help you develop solutions. This is where the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), formed through a partnership between the IACP and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (the COPS Office), comes in.

The CRI-TAC provides a variety of services to law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. The CRI-TAC is focused on the concept of by the field, for the field. You receive assistance from the CRI-TAC’s cadre of subject matter experts, offering peer-to-peer consultation, training, planning, and more to help your agency reach the forefront of cutting-edge innovation and evidence-based practices.

Built to meet the diverse needs of law enforcement agencies, the CRI-TAC is:

  • Comprehensive. The CRI-TAC provides access to the combined experience and resources of the IACP and eight leading law enforcement organizations: Fraternal Order of Police, Major Cities Chiefs Association, FBI National Academy Associates, International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training, National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, and National Tactical Officers Association.
  • Collaborative. The CRI-TAC is founded on the philosophy that local involvement and accountability ensure agencies can meet the needs and expectations of their communities.
  • Customized. The CRI-TAC knows that a policy or training that worked for one agency might not work for yours, so the CRI-TAC team will work with you to develop solutions tailored to your agency.

If you are interested in innovative and expert solutions, if you want to play an active role in the problem-solving process, and if you would like the opportunity to tailor a large variety of resources to your agency, then request assistance from the CRI-TAC today.

Requesting assistance from the CRI-TAC is as simple as clicking a button or sending an email. Visit the CRI-TAC website and click the “Request Technical Assistance” button, or simply email CRITAC@theIACP.org. Tell us what makes your agency unique, such as size and location, and what your challenges are. The CRI-TAC team will focus on listening to you to develop a clear idea of your expectations, needs, and desired services. From there, they will work with you to develop an action plan and deliver the technical assistance solution you need.

Learn more about the CRI-TAC and request assistance on the CRI-TAC website, or email CRITAC@theIACP.org. You can also call the IACP at 800.THE.IACP and ask to speak to one of the CRI-TAC staff.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Join IACP for the National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women

The IACP is now accepting applications for its National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women training, August 21-24, 2018 in Pittsburg, PA. Guided by experts in law enforcement’s response to violence against women, supervisors will explore current approaches for … Continue reading

The IACP is now accepting applications for its National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women training, August 21-24, 2018 in Pittsburg, PA.

Guided by experts in law enforcement’s response to violence against women, supervisors will explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is designed to develop mentoring, training, and leadership skills when responding to these crimes. Past participants consider it an effective and useful training that they could immediately use upon returning to their agency.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • Assess current agency and officer efforts
  • Explore tools and resources to enhance response and investigations
  • Participate in a forum with colleagues to discuss solutions and strategies
  • Design practical action plans specific to agency needs

According to the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, 67% of victims in the United States do not report their sexual assault to law enforcement, and 42% of domestic violence victims in the United States do not report to law enforcement. This training will provide agencies the tools they need to learn why reporting rates are low and how law enforcement can set out to change those numbers.

There is no attendance fee to attend this training. Travel and lodging are not provided. To learn more about the National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women and to apply for this training opportunity visit http://www.theiacp.org/First-Line-Supervisor-Training-on-Violence-Against-Women. The deadline to apply is June 22, 2018.

For more information about law enforcement response to violence against women, including policies, training videos, checklists, and guidelines visit http://www.theiacp.org/Police-Response-to-Violence-Against-Women.

from https://theiacpblog.org

IACP Voices Support for the FIRST STEP Act

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins … Continue reading

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins (R-GA) and Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and in the U.S. Senate by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). The FIRST STEP Act calls for more funding for federal prison programs and incentivizes prisoners to complete the programs in order to hopefully reduce the likelihood of inmates committing new crimes once released from prison.  At the same time the legislation provides additional safeguards to ensure that violent prisoners are not released and that community safety remains the top priority.

The bill passed the House by 360-59 on May 22. The legislation will now need to be considered by the Senate. To view a copy of IACP’s letter with more details on the bill, click here.

from https://theiacpblog.org

IACP Voices Support for the FIRST STEP Act

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins … Continue reading

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins (R-GA) and Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and in the U.S. Senate by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). The FIRST STEP Act calls for more funding for federal prison programs and incentivizes prisoners to complete the programs in order to hopefully reduce the likelihood of inmates committing new crimes once released from prison.  At the same time the legislation provides additional safeguards to ensure that violent prisoners are not released and that community safety remains the top priority.

The bill passed the House by 360-59 on May 22. The legislation will now need to be considered by the Senate. To view a copy of IACP’s letter with more details on the bill, click here.

from https://theiacpblog.org

The value of your professional networking relationships

Guest Blogger: Lt. Christopher Cook, Arlington, Texas, Police Department Most of you can probably remember when you were a rookie officer or an entry-level professional team member with your organization. The thought of professional networking likely meant making friends with … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Lt. Christopher Cook, Arlington, Texas, Police Department

Most of you can probably remember when you were a rookie officer or an entry-level professional team member with your organization. The thought of professional networking likely meant making friends with those inside your organization or meeting colleagues at neighboring agencies. As you moved up the ladder or received a specialized assignment that had more influence, networking opportunities probably presented themselves in greater frequency.

Your membership in the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is one way to extend your professional network. I have been involved with the IACP since 2011 and served as the Chair for the Public Information Officers (PIO) Section since 2015. In my many travels to conferences, forums, and other meetings, I have made many friends along the way and built strong relationships with agencies across the globe.

I can recall many times reaching out to my peers at agencies from coast to coast to get expert advice and guidance on issues that I was facing in my hometown organization. It was always refreshing to know that some of my peer contacts had already dealt with similar situations and could offer help when I needed it most.

I wanted to take a moment and share a recent exchange between my home agency and one in California and Florida. Back in early April, Kaitlyn Perez, Community Affairs Director for the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office in Florida, reached out to me because a suspect they were looking for happened to be traveling through the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. The result was coordinating a joint arrest of the suspect and ensuring the right messaging was put out on social media. Through our prior knowledge of one another, the telephone and email exchange went flawlessly. Ultimately, the community messaging from Sarasota was wonderfully orchestrated.

In a second but unrelated turn of events, the Arlington, Texas, Police Department where I work came across two videos that depicted youth violence and gang activity. While I reported the videos to Google as a violation of their terms of service, I did not get anywhere with removing the videos from the public YouTube site. I reached out to my colleague and friend, Captain Chris Hsiung of the Mountain View, California, Police Department, since I knew Google had business assets in the Mountain View community. As luck would have it, Captain Hsiung was able to connect me with a retired Mountain View lieutenant who works as the lead in Google’s Global Security Operations Center. This allowed us to expedite the request to have YouTube remove the two videos. YouTube removed the videos almost instantaneously after the connection was made.

It was then my honor to return a favor to Mountain View when they reached out to Arlington about our practices on releasing body-worn camera footage. Captain Hsiung inquired into best practices when preparing to release footage of a YouTube shooting suspect encounter. The insights would be instrumental in assisting the agency with their media push and strategy.

These are great examples of the value of belonging to professional organizations which allow you to grow and expand influence during important incidents. During the next IACP conference that you attend, be sure to get out and meet new people, exchange business cards, and forge new friendships. You just never know when you may have to call upon another colleague to get some help.

from https://theiacpblog.org

The Importance of Evidence

Guest Blogger: Wendy Stiver, Major, Dayton Police Department, Ohio In Dayton, Ohio, we’ve seen firsthand as an agency what doesn’t work to effectively respond to the opioid epidemic. Between 2011 and 2017, our county death rate due to opioid overdose increased … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Wendy Stiver, Major, Dayton Police Department, Ohio

In Dayton, Ohio, we’ve seen firsthand as an agency what doesn’t work to effectively respond to the opioid epidemic. Between 2011 and 2017, our county death rate due to opioid overdose increased from 130 deaths per year to 559. The data clearly demonstrates that traditional responses have not worked to reduce harm, but we have made progress by embracing different approaches. Dayton Police Chief Richard S. Biehl and the members of the police department have led innovative and data-driven projects to understand how we can more effectively respond to the opioid crisis within our community, and craft more effective and evidence-based responses to crime, disorder, and community conflict.

In 2016, I became a Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science (LEADS) Scholar, after becoming interested in the program during a research project with Wright State University and our local public health department. LEADS is a National Institute of Justice program that helps mid-career law enforcement officers develop research capacity and supports the use of research to inform law enforcement policies and practices. Through this program, I’ve become a proponent of using data and research, particularly randomized control trials, to inform what we do.

My current research on officer trauma was inspired by the NIJ plenary session at my first IACP Annual Conference in 2016. As much as the opioid crisis affects our community, it also affects our officers. I’ve become particularly interested in the effect of trauma on officers—especially the cumulative effect of “sub-critical” secondary trauma. Sub-critical incidents are those that might be treated as routine calls and do not receive the follow-up or aftercare of a critical incident. Our officers frequently encounter opiate overdoses and deaths, fatal crashes, infant deaths, homicides, and domestic violence as a matter of daily work. In my research, I have worked with our crime analyst to assess the quantity and frequency of patrol officer exposure to such incidents. Before we can understand the impact of cumulative trauma exposure, we need clear data to demonstrate how our officers are exposed to such events.

Analyzing the data, we found that one cross-section of patrol division officers responded to a much higher-than-average share of sub-critical incidents. This group included officers who remained in the same assignment during a calendar year with no extended absences, and led to questions about the nature of assignments, degree of commitment to current assignment, and self-managed exposure. Dr. Danielle Gainer at Wright State University is analyzing the impact on our officers, particularly in light of the opiate crisis.

Why is this kind of research important? Employing evidence-based policies and practices is important for law enforcement because we have an obligation at the most basic level to understand what works and what doesn’t. To know how to most effectively invest our limited resources, it’s critical to have an idea of whether or not what we’re doing is effective, and whether there might be a better way.

Thinking about the opioid epidemic and how it affects our officers is just one area in which Dayton has implemented evidence-based projects. I have also led projects to consider more effective responses to infant mortality. When the data showed us that officers have frequent contact at traffic stops with parents during pregnancy and that mothers had limited access to prenatal care, we could see an opportunity for intervention. We designed a referral program for traffic stops that protects personal health information while increasing access to prenatal care. Approaching infant mortality through traffic enforcement isn’t an intuitive approach, but the data showed us that this made more sense than traditional crib programs.

For those who question why the police would be interested in infant mortality and birth outcomes, the answer lies in evidence. There are a number of studies that show that early intervention can reduce juvenile delinquency and criminality. It makes sense for the police to support an effort that will lighten our load in the future, make our communities safer, and ensure our resources are available to provide high-quality emergency services.

The Dayton Police Department has also partnered with Dr. Cory Haberman at the University of Cincinnati to examine the impact of a downtown foot patrol program. The final analysis of the foot patrol program revealed that short focused foot patrols prevented 81 crimes in our downtown.

These and other evidence-based efforts are working to reduce crime, which is helping support a cultural change in the downtown patrol division, where our officers are asked to embrace Tourism Oriented Policing concepts. We hope to carry out many additional evidence-based projects in the future. In all the research projects we take on, we try to answer fundamental questions about how we can better understand and respond to the problems our community faces. At the core of our research lies a key question: what works?

Data-driven research projects are challenging. Despite the growing cadre of professional crime analysts, we have limited abilities to accurately interpret and apply data. Moving from theoretical results to a practical response can sometimes feel like an overwhelming proposition. Often, the studies I conduct lead to more questions than they answer. Still, I’m a proponent of law enforcement agencies using data and research to inform their decisions. In order to ensure our policies and practices are effectively keeping the communities safe, research and empirical evidence are necessities to the advancement of policing. Without research and empirical evidence, we can’t answer the most important question of all: are the policies and practices we implement to keep our communities safe working?

For more information on the Center for Police Research and Policy, please visit http://www.theIACP.org/research.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Benefits of Attending the 2018 IACP Technology Conference

Guest Blogger: Bonnie Locke, Nlets Director of Business Development and Chair of the IACP LEIT Section.  Today’s law enforcement professionals face unprecedented technological challenges, from cyber-attacks that compromise personal information, to the difficulty in monitoring active intelligence from social media. Similar to … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Bonnie Locke, Nlets Director of Business Development and Chair of the IACP LEIT Section. 

Today’s law enforcement professionals face unprecedented technological challenges, from cyber-attacks that compromise personal information, to the difficulty in monitoring active intelligence from social media.

Similar to officers on the street, law enforcement information technology professionals face a diverse set of issues depending on the size of the agency, location, budget, and existing infrastructure. While some agencies may be asking for guidance on how to create, deploy, and maintain a data warehouse, other agencies may be looking for guidance on how develop an in-house advanced video analytic system or how to conduct successful dark web investigations. The law enforcement community needs to address these problems together, keeping an open line of communication toward the goal of interoperability, unified standards, and the fusion of disparate information resources.

Although today’s public safety personnel rise to the challenge every day, they need the tools to keep up in an evolving landscape. It takes cutting edge information technology and policy guidance to ensure law enforcement is able to respond to real-time crime intelligence, communicate, and function efficiently. The 2018 IACP Technology Conference, May 21-23, in Providence, Rhode Island, provides criminal justice and public safety professionals an opportunity to share ideas that will help keep citizens and officers safe.

This three-day conference will cover a variety of emerging issues in technology including:

  • Leveraging Blockchain in Criminal Investigations
  • Highly Autonomous Vehicles- Is Law Enforcement Ready?
  • Using Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Officer Safety
  • Monitoring Social Media in Real Time with Free Tools

As well more familiar issues such as:

  • NIBRS: How to Work with Vendors to Ensure a Seamless Transition
  • How to Improve Communications using Mobile Apps
  • Finding a Policy Framework to Use When Procuring New Technology
  • Developing a Long-Term IT Vision

Today’s technology is changing so incredibly fast and it’s an integral part of what we do. I am excited to hear from leading practitioners that can talk about what is working in the field, generate thought provoking ideas, and help identify the solutions that agencies can adopt today or consider for the future. Every year, I meet law enforcement professionals and industry partners that are game changers. Whether you are a public safety technologist, analyst, manager, or executive – the IACP Technology Conference is a must. I hope you will join me this year and discover the possible.

Still determining how attending the Technology Conference will benefit your agency? Check out the Technology Conference justification kit. Visit http://www.theIACP.org/Tech-Conference for more information or to register.

See you in Providence!

from https://theiacpblog.org