FBI Director to Cops: Don’t Listen to ‘Armchair Critics’

Speaking at a convention of police chiefs in Orlando, Christopher Wray cited the opiate crisis, mass violence, terrorism and cyber threats as law enforcement priorities. And the leader of an agency that has faced oppressive attacks from Donald Trump pointedly said that law enforcers must “tune out the noise” emanating from critics.

Improved communication and collaboration among federal, state and local law enforcement agencies is essential to confront the “unprecedented” threats to public safety that the United States faces, FBI Director Christopher Wray said Sunday.

Speaking at the annual conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police in Orlando, Wray also cited the background noise that law enforcers face in dealing with “armchair critics.” Wray did not mention Donald Trump in his speech, but the president has made a habit of attacking the FBI as “corrupt” on Twitter.

Wray listed these law enforcement “significant challenges”:

  • The opiate crisis. More than 72,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017, “and by all accounts, the problem is getting worse,” Wray said. He urged a renewed effort to reduce the narcotics supply from China and Mexico. “This has become a national security issue that plays itself out on our streets every day,” he said.
  • Mass violence. “In 2017 alone, there were 30 separate active shootings in the United States—the biggest number ever recorded by the FBI during a one-year period,” Wray said.
  • International and domestic terrorism. “The homegrown violent extremist threat is the new normal,” Wray said. “These folks are largely radicalized online, and they’re inspired by the global jihadist movement.” He said the bureau has terrorist investigations in all 50 states, and arrests have been made “all over the map, in cities big and small.”
  • Cyber security. “The cyber threat continues to grow by leaps and bounds, and the more we shift to the Internet as the conduit and the repository for everything we use and share and manage, the more danger we’re in,” he said.

“We need to rely on each other for information, for experience and best practices, for new ideas and new ways of looking at old problems,” Wray told the police chiefs, according to a transcript provided by the FBI. Among other things, he cited an effort by big-city chiefs and county sheriffs “to develop a comprehensive threat assessment to help law enforcement leaders better identify, analyze, and prioritize the major threats facing their communities.”

Wray, 51, was appointed by Trump in August 2017 following his controversial dismissal of James Comey. Wray, just the eighth man to lead the agency, has been buffeted by Trump’s Twitter criticisms of the FBI and the Department of Justice–and their leaders, including Wray and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Among numerous other examples, Trump tweeted on Sept. 1, “You’ve got corruption at the DOJ & FBI. The leadership of the DOJ & FBI are completely out to lunch in terms of exposing and holding those accountable who are responsible for that corruption.”

While failing to mention Trump, Wray closed with a riff on the wearying strain that detractors bring to an already taxing occupation.

“Our jobs seem to be getting more daunting each day,” Wray said. “And there are lots of days when you think there’s got to be an easier way to make a living.”

He offered this piece of advice: “Tune out the noise, the chatter, and the armchair critics. Focus on the work, and the people we do the work for. Heads up, eyes forward, shoulder-to-shoulder. We’ll forge ahead—together.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

Critical Messaging Sheets: A Guide to Developing Messaging That Resonates

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more … Continue reading

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more complex—especially for law enforcement professionals. Law enforcement personnel are often expected to discuss and respond to sensitive topics with an unrivaled level of speed, transparency, and sensitivity.

Every day, agencies around the world rise to the challenge, but not without using up-to-date facts and strategically-structured language. Seeing the need for a single, online resource that brings together these elements, the IACP created messaging worksheets for its members. These worksheets contain information about a wide range of issues, suggestions on talking-points, and guidance on how to structure a message that’s effective.

Currently, worksheets are available on the following topics:

  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Community-Police Relations
  • Encryption/Going Dark
  • Firearms: Background Checks
  • Fire Arms Security, Training and Investigation
  • Marijuana Legalization and Traffic Safety
  • Mental Health Response
  • Naloxone
  • Reducing Incarceration
  • Use of Force
  • Use of Military Equipment

To access the worksheets, visit the Critical Issues Webpage or explore your topic of interest. Messaging worksheets are a member-only benefit.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Critical Messaging Sheets: A Guide to Developing Messaging That Resonates

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more … Continue reading

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more complex—especially for law enforcement professionals. Law enforcement personnel are often expected to discuss and respond to sensitive topics with an unrivaled level of speed, transparency, and sensitivity.

Every day, agencies around the world rise to the challenge, but not without using up-to-date facts and strategically-structured language. Seeing the need for a single, online resource that brings together these elements, the IACP created messaging worksheets for its members. These worksheets contain information about a wide range of issues, suggestions on talking-points, and guidance on how to structure a message that’s effective.

Currently, worksheets are available on the following topics:

  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Community-Police Relations
  • Encryption/Going Dark
  • Firearms: Background Checks
  • Fire Arms Security, Training and Investigation
  • Marijuana Legalization and Traffic Safety
  • Mental Health Response
  • Naloxone
  • Reducing Incarceration
  • Use of Force
  • Use of Military Equipment

To access the worksheets, visit the Critical Issues Webpage or explore your topic of interest. Messaging worksheets are a member-only benefit.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Critical Messaging Sheets: A Guide to Developing Messaging That Resonates

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more … Continue reading

At the core of positive community-police relations is effective communication. While social media, enhanced mobile devices, and increased access to the internet have created new spaces in which to communicate, these technologies have also made the art of communication more complex—especially for law enforcement professionals. Law enforcement personnel are often expected to discuss and respond to sensitive topics with an unrivaled level of speed, transparency, and sensitivity.

Every day, agencies around the world rise to the challenge, but not without using up-to-date facts and strategically-structured language. Seeing the need for a single, online resource that brings together these elements, the IACP created messaging worksheets for its members. These worksheets contain information about a wide range of issues, suggestions on talking-points, and guidance on how to structure a message that’s effective.

Currently, worksheets are available on the following topics:

  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Community-Police Relations
  • Encryption/Going Dark
  • Firearms: Background Checks
  • Fire Arms Security, Training and Investigation
  • Marijuana Legalization and Traffic Safety
  • Mental Health Response
  • Naloxone
  • Reducing Incarceration
  • Use of Force
  • Use of Military Equipment

To access the worksheets, visit the Critical Issues Webpage or explore your topic of interest. Messaging worksheets are a member-only benefit.

from https://theiacpblog.org

No-Cost, Customized Technical Assistance: the CRI-TAC is Here to Help

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where … Continue reading

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where you are, and they stand ready to help you develop solutions. This is where the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), formed through a partnership between the IACP and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (the COPS Office), comes in.

The CRI-TAC provides a variety of services to law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. The CRI-TAC is focused on the concept of by the field, for the field. You receive assistance from the CRI-TAC’s cadre of subject matter experts, offering peer-to-peer consultation, training, planning, and more to help your agency reach the forefront of cutting-edge innovation and evidence-based practices.

Built to meet the diverse needs of law enforcement agencies, the CRI-TAC is:

  • Comprehensive. The CRI-TAC provides access to the combined experience and resources of the IACP and eight leading law enforcement organizations: Fraternal Order of Police, Major Cities Chiefs Association, FBI National Academy Associates, International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training, National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, and National Tactical Officers Association.
  • Collaborative. The CRI-TAC is founded on the philosophy that local involvement and accountability ensure agencies can meet the needs and expectations of their communities.
  • Customized. The CRI-TAC knows that a policy or training that worked for one agency might not work for yours, so the CRI-TAC team will work with you to develop solutions tailored to your agency.

If you are interested in innovative and expert solutions, if you want to play an active role in the problem-solving process, and if you would like the opportunity to tailor a large variety of resources to your agency, then request assistance from the CRI-TAC today.

Requesting assistance from the CRI-TAC is as simple as clicking a button or sending an email. Visit the CRI-TAC website and click the “Request Technical Assistance” button, or simply email CRITAC@theIACP.org. Tell us what makes your agency unique, such as size and location, and what your challenges are. The CRI-TAC team will focus on listening to you to develop a clear idea of your expectations, needs, and desired services. From there, they will work with you to develop an action plan and deliver the technical assistance solution you need.

Learn more about the CRI-TAC and request assistance on the CRI-TAC website, or email CRITAC@theIACP.org. You can also call the IACP at 800.THE.IACP and ask to speak to one of the CRI-TAC staff.

from https://theiacpblog.org

No-Cost, Customized Technical Assistance: the CRI-TAC is Here to Help

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where … Continue reading

Law enforcement agencies today face increasingly complex and persistent challenges. As a law enforcement executive, you work hard every day to rise to those challenges, and often there are no simple solutions. You are not alone. Others have been where you are, and they stand ready to help you develop solutions. This is where the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), formed through a partnership between the IACP and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (the COPS Office), comes in.

The CRI-TAC provides a variety of services to law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. The CRI-TAC is focused on the concept of by the field, for the field. You receive assistance from the CRI-TAC’s cadre of subject matter experts, offering peer-to-peer consultation, training, planning, and more to help your agency reach the forefront of cutting-edge innovation and evidence-based practices.

Built to meet the diverse needs of law enforcement agencies, the CRI-TAC is:

  • Comprehensive. The CRI-TAC provides access to the combined experience and resources of the IACP and eight leading law enforcement organizations: Fraternal Order of Police, Major Cities Chiefs Association, FBI National Academy Associates, International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training, National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, and National Tactical Officers Association.
  • Collaborative. The CRI-TAC is founded on the philosophy that local involvement and accountability ensure agencies can meet the needs and expectations of their communities.
  • Customized. The CRI-TAC knows that a policy or training that worked for one agency might not work for yours, so the CRI-TAC team will work with you to develop solutions tailored to your agency.

If you are interested in innovative and expert solutions, if you want to play an active role in the problem-solving process, and if you would like the opportunity to tailor a large variety of resources to your agency, then request assistance from the CRI-TAC today.

Requesting assistance from the CRI-TAC is as simple as clicking a button or sending an email. Visit the CRI-TAC website and click the “Request Technical Assistance” button, or simply email CRITAC@theIACP.org. Tell us what makes your agency unique, such as size and location, and what your challenges are. The CRI-TAC team will focus on listening to you to develop a clear idea of your expectations, needs, and desired services. From there, they will work with you to develop an action plan and deliver the technical assistance solution you need.

Learn more about the CRI-TAC and request assistance on the CRI-TAC website, or email CRITAC@theIACP.org. You can also call the IACP at 800.THE.IACP and ask to speak to one of the CRI-TAC staff.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Join IACP for the National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women

The IACP is now accepting applications for its National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women training, August 21-24, 2018 in Pittsburg, PA. Guided by experts in law enforcement’s response to violence against women, supervisors will explore current approaches for … Continue reading

The IACP is now accepting applications for its National First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women training, August 21-24, 2018 in Pittsburg, PA.

Guided by experts in law enforcement’s response to violence against women, supervisors will explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is designed to develop mentoring, training, and leadership skills when responding to these crimes. Past participants consider it an effective and useful training that they could immediately use upon returning to their agency.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • Assess current agency and officer efforts
  • Explore tools and resources to enhance response and investigations
  • Participate in a forum with colleagues to discuss solutions and strategies
  • Design practical action plans specific to agency needs

According to the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, 67% of victims in the United States do not report their sexual assault to law enforcement, and 42% of domestic violence victims in the United States do not report to law enforcement. This training will provide agencies the tools they need to learn why reporting rates are low and how law enforcement can set out to change those numbers.

There is no attendance fee to attend this training. Travel and lodging are not provided. To learn more about the National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women and to apply for this training opportunity visit http://www.theiacp.org/First-Line-Supervisor-Training-on-Violence-Against-Women. The deadline to apply is June 22, 2018.

For more information about law enforcement response to violence against women, including policies, training videos, checklists, and guidelines visit http://www.theiacp.org/Police-Response-to-Violence-Against-Women.

from https://theiacpblog.org

IACP Voices Support for the FIRST STEP Act

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins … Continue reading

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins (R-GA) and Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and in the U.S. Senate by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). The FIRST STEP Act calls for more funding for federal prison programs and incentivizes prisoners to complete the programs in order to hopefully reduce the likelihood of inmates committing new crimes once released from prison.  At the same time the legislation provides additional safeguards to ensure that violent prisoners are not released and that community safety remains the top priority.

The bill passed the House by 360-59 on May 22. The legislation will now need to be considered by the Senate. To view a copy of IACP’s letter with more details on the bill, click here.

from https://theiacpblog.org

IACP Voices Support for the FIRST STEP Act

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins … Continue reading

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) sent a letter to Congress in support of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 2795/H.R. 5682). The FIRST STEP Act was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Congressmen Doug Collins (R-GA) and Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) and in the U.S. Senate by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). The FIRST STEP Act calls for more funding for federal prison programs and incentivizes prisoners to complete the programs in order to hopefully reduce the likelihood of inmates committing new crimes once released from prison.  At the same time the legislation provides additional safeguards to ensure that violent prisoners are not released and that community safety remains the top priority.

The bill passed the House by 360-59 on May 22. The legislation will now need to be considered by the Senate. To view a copy of IACP’s letter with more details on the bill, click here.

from https://theiacpblog.org

The value of your professional networking relationships

Guest Blogger: Lt. Christopher Cook, Arlington, Texas, Police Department Most of you can probably remember when you were a rookie officer or an entry-level professional team member with your organization. The thought of professional networking likely meant making friends with … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Lt. Christopher Cook, Arlington, Texas, Police Department

Most of you can probably remember when you were a rookie officer or an entry-level professional team member with your organization. The thought of professional networking likely meant making friends with those inside your organization or meeting colleagues at neighboring agencies. As you moved up the ladder or received a specialized assignment that had more influence, networking opportunities probably presented themselves in greater frequency.

Your membership in the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is one way to extend your professional network. I have been involved with the IACP since 2011 and served as the Chair for the Public Information Officers (PIO) Section since 2015. In my many travels to conferences, forums, and other meetings, I have made many friends along the way and built strong relationships with agencies across the globe.

I can recall many times reaching out to my peers at agencies from coast to coast to get expert advice and guidance on issues that I was facing in my hometown organization. It was always refreshing to know that some of my peer contacts had already dealt with similar situations and could offer help when I needed it most.

I wanted to take a moment and share a recent exchange between my home agency and one in California and Florida. Back in early April, Kaitlyn Perez, Community Affairs Director for the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office in Florida, reached out to me because a suspect they were looking for happened to be traveling through the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. The result was coordinating a joint arrest of the suspect and ensuring the right messaging was put out on social media. Through our prior knowledge of one another, the telephone and email exchange went flawlessly. Ultimately, the community messaging from Sarasota was wonderfully orchestrated.

In a second but unrelated turn of events, the Arlington, Texas, Police Department where I work came across two videos that depicted youth violence and gang activity. While I reported the videos to Google as a violation of their terms of service, I did not get anywhere with removing the videos from the public YouTube site. I reached out to my colleague and friend, Captain Chris Hsiung of the Mountain View, California, Police Department, since I knew Google had business assets in the Mountain View community. As luck would have it, Captain Hsiung was able to connect me with a retired Mountain View lieutenant who works as the lead in Google’s Global Security Operations Center. This allowed us to expedite the request to have YouTube remove the two videos. YouTube removed the videos almost instantaneously after the connection was made.

It was then my honor to return a favor to Mountain View when they reached out to Arlington about our practices on releasing body-worn camera footage. Captain Hsiung inquired into best practices when preparing to release footage of a YouTube shooting suspect encounter. The insights would be instrumental in assisting the agency with their media push and strategy.

These are great examples of the value of belonging to professional organizations which allow you to grow and expand influence during important incidents. During the next IACP conference that you attend, be sure to get out and meet new people, exchange business cards, and forge new friendships. You just never know when you may have to call upon another colleague to get some help.

from https://theiacpblog.org