The Importance of Evidence

Guest Blogger: Wendy Stiver, Major, Dayton Police Department, Ohio In Dayton, Ohio, we’ve seen firsthand as an agency what doesn’t work to effectively respond to the opioid epidemic. Between 2011 and 2017, our county death rate due to opioid overdose increased … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Wendy Stiver, Major, Dayton Police Department, Ohio

In Dayton, Ohio, we’ve seen firsthand as an agency what doesn’t work to effectively respond to the opioid epidemic. Between 2011 and 2017, our county death rate due to opioid overdose increased from 130 deaths per year to 559. The data clearly demonstrates that traditional responses have not worked to reduce harm, but we have made progress by embracing different approaches. Dayton Police Chief Richard S. Biehl and the members of the police department have led innovative and data-driven projects to understand how we can more effectively respond to the opioid crisis within our community, and craft more effective and evidence-based responses to crime, disorder, and community conflict.

In 2016, I became a Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science (LEADS) Scholar, after becoming interested in the program during a research project with Wright State University and our local public health department. LEADS is a National Institute of Justice program that helps mid-career law enforcement officers develop research capacity and supports the use of research to inform law enforcement policies and practices. Through this program, I’ve become a proponent of using data and research, particularly randomized control trials, to inform what we do.

My current research on officer trauma was inspired by the NIJ plenary session at my first IACP Annual Conference in 2016. As much as the opioid crisis affects our community, it also affects our officers. I’ve become particularly interested in the effect of trauma on officers—especially the cumulative effect of “sub-critical” secondary trauma. Sub-critical incidents are those that might be treated as routine calls and do not receive the follow-up or aftercare of a critical incident. Our officers frequently encounter opiate overdoses and deaths, fatal crashes, infant deaths, homicides, and domestic violence as a matter of daily work. In my research, I have worked with our crime analyst to assess the quantity and frequency of patrol officer exposure to such incidents. Before we can understand the impact of cumulative trauma exposure, we need clear data to demonstrate how our officers are exposed to such events.

Analyzing the data, we found that one cross-section of patrol division officers responded to a much higher-than-average share of sub-critical incidents. This group included officers who remained in the same assignment during a calendar year with no extended absences, and led to questions about the nature of assignments, degree of commitment to current assignment, and self-managed exposure. Dr. Danielle Gainer at Wright State University is analyzing the impact on our officers, particularly in light of the opiate crisis.

Why is this kind of research important? Employing evidence-based policies and practices is important for law enforcement because we have an obligation at the most basic level to understand what works and what doesn’t. To know how to most effectively invest our limited resources, it’s critical to have an idea of whether or not what we’re doing is effective, and whether there might be a better way.

Thinking about the opioid epidemic and how it affects our officers is just one area in which Dayton has implemented evidence-based projects. I have also led projects to consider more effective responses to infant mortality. When the data showed us that officers have frequent contact at traffic stops with parents during pregnancy and that mothers had limited access to prenatal care, we could see an opportunity for intervention. We designed a referral program for traffic stops that protects personal health information while increasing access to prenatal care. Approaching infant mortality through traffic enforcement isn’t an intuitive approach, but the data showed us that this made more sense than traditional crib programs.

For those who question why the police would be interested in infant mortality and birth outcomes, the answer lies in evidence. There are a number of studies that show that early intervention can reduce juvenile delinquency and criminality. It makes sense for the police to support an effort that will lighten our load in the future, make our communities safer, and ensure our resources are available to provide high-quality emergency services.

The Dayton Police Department has also partnered with Dr. Cory Haberman at the University of Cincinnati to examine the impact of a downtown foot patrol program. The final analysis of the foot patrol program revealed that short focused foot patrols prevented 81 crimes in our downtown.

These and other evidence-based efforts are working to reduce crime, which is helping support a cultural change in the downtown patrol division, where our officers are asked to embrace Tourism Oriented Policing concepts. We hope to carry out many additional evidence-based projects in the future. In all the research projects we take on, we try to answer fundamental questions about how we can better understand and respond to the problems our community faces. At the core of our research lies a key question: what works?

Data-driven research projects are challenging. Despite the growing cadre of professional crime analysts, we have limited abilities to accurately interpret and apply data. Moving from theoretical results to a practical response can sometimes feel like an overwhelming proposition. Often, the studies I conduct lead to more questions than they answer. Still, I’m a proponent of law enforcement agencies using data and research to inform their decisions. In order to ensure our policies and practices are effectively keeping the communities safe, research and empirical evidence are necessities to the advancement of policing. Without research and empirical evidence, we can’t answer the most important question of all: are the policies and practices we implement to keep our communities safe working?

For more information on the Center for Police Research and Policy, please visit http://www.theIACP.org/research.

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Benefits of Attending the 2018 IACP Technology Conference

Guest Blogger: Bonnie Locke, Nlets Director of Business Development and Chair of the IACP LEIT Section.  Today’s law enforcement professionals face unprecedented technological challenges, from cyber-attacks that compromise personal information, to the difficulty in monitoring active intelligence from social media. Similar to … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Bonnie Locke, Nlets Director of Business Development and Chair of the IACP LEIT Section. 

Today’s law enforcement professionals face unprecedented technological challenges, from cyber-attacks that compromise personal information, to the difficulty in monitoring active intelligence from social media.

Similar to officers on the street, law enforcement information technology professionals face a diverse set of issues depending on the size of the agency, location, budget, and existing infrastructure. While some agencies may be asking for guidance on how to create, deploy, and maintain a data warehouse, other agencies may be looking for guidance on how develop an in-house advanced video analytic system or how to conduct successful dark web investigations. The law enforcement community needs to address these problems together, keeping an open line of communication toward the goal of interoperability, unified standards, and the fusion of disparate information resources.

Although today’s public safety personnel rise to the challenge every day, they need the tools to keep up in an evolving landscape. It takes cutting edge information technology and policy guidance to ensure law enforcement is able to respond to real-time crime intelligence, communicate, and function efficiently. The 2018 IACP Technology Conference, May 21-23, in Providence, Rhode Island, provides criminal justice and public safety professionals an opportunity to share ideas that will help keep citizens and officers safe.

This three-day conference will cover a variety of emerging issues in technology including:

  • Leveraging Blockchain in Criminal Investigations
  • Highly Autonomous Vehicles- Is Law Enforcement Ready?
  • Using Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Officer Safety
  • Monitoring Social Media in Real Time with Free Tools

As well more familiar issues such as:

  • NIBRS: How to Work with Vendors to Ensure a Seamless Transition
  • How to Improve Communications using Mobile Apps
  • Finding a Policy Framework to Use When Procuring New Technology
  • Developing a Long-Term IT Vision

Today’s technology is changing so incredibly fast and it’s an integral part of what we do. I am excited to hear from leading practitioners that can talk about what is working in the field, generate thought provoking ideas, and help identify the solutions that agencies can adopt today or consider for the future. Every year, I meet law enforcement professionals and industry partners that are game changers. Whether you are a public safety technologist, analyst, manager, or executive – the IACP Technology Conference is a must. I hope you will join me this year and discover the possible.

Still determining how attending the Technology Conference will benefit your agency? Check out the Technology Conference justification kit. Visit http://www.theIACP.org/Tech-Conference for more information or to register.

See you in Providence!

from https://theiacpblog.org

IACP and Motorola Solutions Name Corporal Seth Kelly as Trooper of the Year

On March 16, 2018, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Motorola Solutions named Corporal Seth Kelly from the Pennsylvania State Police the IACP/Motorola Solutions 2017 Trooper of the Year. Corporal Kelly was chosen from four finalists among … Continue reading

On March 16, 2018, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Motorola Solutions named Corporal Seth Kelly from the Pennsylvania State Police the IACP/Motorola Solutions 2017 Trooper of the Year. Corporal Kelly was chosen from four finalists among state and provincial agencies of the United States and Canada for this honor.

“Motorola Solutions is proud to partner with the International Association of Chiefs of Police to honor the selfless work being done in police agencies every day around the world,” said Jim Mears, senior vice president, North America Market, Motorola Solutions. “Men and women in state and provincial police agencies know the situations they face can change in an instant, yet they continue to put their lives on the line to help keep their communities safe. Motorola Solutions humbly recognizes the brave efforts by Corporal Kelly and the sacrifices made by all law enforcement.”

On November 7, 2017 Corporal Seth Kelly of the Pennsylvania State Police arrived on scene to assist Trooper Ryan Seiple with a routine traffic stop. A suspect was pulled over for speeding but after a second approach, Trooper Seiple suspected that the suspect was under the influence of a controlled substance and called Corporal Kelly for backup. After failing the field sobriety test, the suspect became violent as the troopers attempted to take him into custody. As the altercation ensued, both troopers deployed their electronic control weapons, but the struggle escalated onto the highway. Corporal Kelly pulled the subject back onto the shoulder of the highway to safety, but the suspect managed to break free, return to his vehicle, and grab a pistol. The suspect fired six shots; three of which struck Corporal Kelly. Despite being injured, Corporal Kelly managed to return fire and shield himself behind the guard rail until the threat was gone and his fellow Trooper was safe. After the subject fled the scene, Corporal Kelly assessed his injuries and gauged he’d been shot close to his femoral artery. Using a personal tourniquet, he was able to control the bleeding from his leg and make it to the hospital. On the same day, the suspect was apprehended taken to the hospital and charged with Attempted Homicide of a Law Enforcement Officer and several other counts. Corporal Kelly’s injuries left him in a medically induced coma for 12 days. Corporal Kelly has made significant progress in his recovery and looks forward to serving the people of Pennsylvania once again.

“Congratulations to our 2017 Trooper of the Year Corporal Seth Kelly. IACP is proud to honor your courage, professionalism, and dedication to your community. We appreciate your continued commitment to public service. All four finalists are exceptional examples of the heroism displayed by law enforcement officers across the globe. On behalf of the entire association, congratulations and thank you for your public service,” said IACP President Louis M. Dekmar, Chief of Police, LaGrange Police Department.

The other IACP/Motorola Solutions Trooper of the Year finalists were Corporal Hope Hohertz, Texas Department of Public Safety; Trooper Adam Whitmarsh, Nevada Highway Patrol; and Trooper Dustin Henningsen, Iowa State Patrol. Their stories can be found on the IACP blog at: http://bit.ly/2u1gZKr.

from https://theiacpblog.org

U.S. Attorney General Sessions Announces Launch of New Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center

Attorney General Jeff Sessions today announced the launch of the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC) during the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Division Midyear Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. The CRI-TAC brings together a coalition of the … Continue reading

Attorney General Jeff Sessions today announced the launch of the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC) during the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Division Midyear Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. The CRI-TAC brings together a coalition of the United States’ top public safety organizations under the leadership of the IACP to provide tailored technical assistance to policing agencies through a $7 million award from the Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office).

Using a “by the field, for the field” approach, the CRI-TAC supports state, local, tribal, and campus agencies through a host of methods, including training, peer-to-peer consultation, and strategic planning. These resources are designed to support agencies on a range of public safety, crime reduction, and community policing topics.

For the first time ever, the following law enforcement stakeholder organizations – and their over 420,000 members – are working together to create a center of resources and subject matter expertise explicitly focusing on the needs of policing agencies:

  • Fraternal Order of Police (FOP)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy Associates (FBINAA)
  • International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA)
  • International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST)
  • Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA)
  • National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE)
  • National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE)
  • National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA)

“The IACP is excited to work alongside eight leading law enforcement leadership and labor organizations to build and deliver this comprehensive technical assistance center that can support the diverse agencies and communities around the U.S. with customized solutions for the field, by the field,” said IACP President Louis M. Dekmar, Chief of the LaGrange, Georgia, Police Department.

Law enforcement agencies interested in submitting a voluntary request to participate in the CRI-TAC should visit www.collaborativereform.org.

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International Association of Chiefs of Police Applauds U.S. President Trump’s Action on Bump Stocks

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) applauds the action taken by U.S. President Donald Trump to ban the sale and use of bump fire stocks and similar devices. The President’s leadership in addressing the threat posed by these … Continue reading

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) applauds the action taken by U.S. President Donald Trump to ban the sale and use of bump fire stocks and similar devices. The President’s leadership in addressing the threat posed by these devices will assist in our efforts to make communities safer and protect the lives of both citizens and law enforcement officers.  

The IACP strongly supports the quick implementation of this regulation and believes that it should, at a minimum, prohibit the possession, import, manufacturing, transfer and sale of bump-fire devices, trigger cranks, and similar attachments or any accessories that are designed to increase or modify semi-automatic firearms to automatic weapons. 

The IACP looks forward to working with President Trump, his administration, and other policymakers as we identify and implement additional measures that will minimize the devastation caused by gun violence. 

 

from https://theiacpblog.org

Statement of IACP President Louis M. Dekmar on Recent Tragedies and the Need for Immediate Action on Firearms Policy

We mourn the loss of the victims of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and pray for those that were injured in this horrific attack. With each mass shooting, the global policing community grieves … Continue reading

We mourn the loss of the victims of the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and pray for those that were injured in this horrific attack. With each mass shooting, the global policing community grieves with the victims, their families, first responders and the communities they serve.

As we grieve for the victims of the Florida shooting, we are also torn with sadness over the loss of the 18 officers killed in the United States in the first six weeks of 2018; 12 which were killed by a firearm. The violence against police experienced so far this year is a stark reminder of the dangers law enforcement face each day protecting their communities.

Law enforcement leaders, community members, policymakers, advocacy groups and others must come together to have a thoughtful discussion on a path forward. The first step is having a critical policy dialogue on steps we can take, together, to minimize the devastation caused by gun violence – focused on expanded background checks, closing the gun show loophole, limiting access to silencers/suppressors and putting measures in place that prevent persons affected by mental illness from acquiring firearms.

IACP is prepared to lead the above needed policy discussions.

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Get Your (Art)Work Recognized!

The IACP is holding two exciting contests: a police-community engagement photo contest and a patch design contest to commemorate the association’s 125th anniversary. Police Chief Magazine Photo Contest Coretta Scott King once said, “The greatness of a community is most … Continue reading

March-2016The IACP is holding two exciting contests: a police-community engagement photo contest and a patch design contest to commemorate the association’s 125th anniversary.

Police Chief Magazine Photo Contest

Coretta Scott King once said, “The greatness of a community is most accurately measured by the compassionate actions of its members.”

The IACP recognizes the importance and value in building and maintaining relationships and partnerships in diverse communities, and ensuring equal respect and treatment of all who are involved.

With this philosophy in mind, we are launching the Police Chief Magazine Photography Contest, which is designed to showcase your agency’s work in the communities you serve.

Have you witnessed outstanding work in your neighborhood and you want to show that excellence, excitement, or effective communication? Snap some photos of real-life agency personnel in action and submit them to the contest.

The Grand Prize winner will be featured on the cover of the Police Chief’s August 2018 edition which is themed “Community-Police Engagement.”

Plus, if your photo submission is selected as a runner-up, you have a chance of seeing it in Police Chief, as well!

The official social media hashtag for the contest is #PCMagContest. Also, don’t forget to tag us on Twitter at @theIACP or #PoliceChiefMag.

Guidelines, the submission form, and more information can be found at Police Chief Online.

Patch imagesIACP’s 125th Anniversary Patch Design Contest

The IACP is holding a Patch Design Contest to commemorate the association’s 125th anniversary. Submit a design that showcases the rich history and forward momentum of the association. The winning patch will be revealed at the 2018 Annual Conference and Exposition in Orlando, Florida.

For more information, email the contest staff at 125th@theiacp.org or follow the hashtag on social media #IACP125th.

The greatest value of the IACP lies in you, our members, and this is a great way to get your hard work and service recognized. Submit a photograph or patch design today!

 

 

 

from https://theiacpblog.org

Statement by the IACP on the U.S. Department of Justice Decision to Rescind the Cole Memo

Today, the U.S. Department of Justice announced it will be rescinding the Cole Memo and that it will restore discretion to U.S. Attorneys on how they prioritize the investigation and prosecution of violations of federal drug laws involving marijuana. The … Continue reading

Today, the U.S. Department of Justice announced it will be rescinding the Cole Memo and that it will restore discretion to U.S. Attorneys on how they prioritize the investigation and prosecution of violations of federal drug laws involving marijuana. The IACP strongly supports this policy change.

In 2013, the Cole memo announced how the U.S. Department of Justice would alter its enforcement efforts regarding the federal law as it relates to marijuana legalization. At that time, the IACP announced its opposition to the Cole Memo because of its longstanding position against the legalization of marijuana and the public safety risks it imposes to communities. Today’s action by the Department of Justice is consistent with IACP policy and would allow for legal action to preempt the state marijuana legalization laws that conflict with federal law; and enable U.S. Attorneys to enforce federal law concerning marijuana as Congress intended when it enacted the Controlled Substances Act.

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IACP Celebrates its 125th Anniversary

When Chief Webber Seavey of the Omaha, Nebraska, Police Department met with police chiefs from across the United States in 1893 in Chicago, Illinois, he probably could not have envisioned the endurance of the organization that was created that year. … Continue reading

125th_IACP_Logo_pms_285_445When Chief Webber Seavey of the Omaha, Nebraska, Police Department met with police chiefs from across the United States in 1893 in Chicago, Illinois, he probably could not have envisioned the endurance of the organization that was created that year.

Since 1893, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has grown into a leader in law enforcement worldwide, reaching more than 30,000 members in more than 150 countries. Our members are the reason for the organization’s longevity and this year, we invite you to celebrate with us.

2018 marks the IACP’s 125th anniversary. It will be a year of celebration as well as one of reflection, to look back on all we have done and to look forward to all that we can do in the next 125 years.

Some ways you can participate in the celebration:

Join IACP for $125 in January: The IACP is inviting new members to join for $125 throughout the month of January, a savings of $25. Already a member? This is a great opportunity to encourage a colleague to join.

Share Milestones: Send us your photos, stories, and memories to be highlighted on our anniversary webpage. You can share on social media by using the hashtag #IACP125th or email them to 125th@theiacp.org.

Patch Contest: The IACP is holding a patch design contest to commemorate the association’s 125th anniversary. Submit a design that showcases the rich history and forward momentum of the association. The winning patch will be revealed at the 2018 Annual Conference.

There will be much more to come throughout the year, all of which will culminate at the 2018 Annual Conference this October. Visit the 125th Anniversary webpage for updates or follow the hashtag #IACP125th on social media.

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IACP Awarded Monumental Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) received a $7 million award from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), U.S. Department of Justice’s Collaborative Reform Initiative for Technical Assistance. This monumental funding opportunity will enable … Continue reading

Today, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) received a $7 million award from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), U.S. Department of Justice’s Collaborative Reform Initiative for Technical Assistance. This monumental funding opportunity will enable the IACP and other prominent law enforcement associations to create the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC).

The CRI-TAC will provide quality, customizable technical assistance for state, local, territorial, and tribal law enforcement agencies, enabling them to continue to enhance their organizational, public safety, crime reduction, and community policing effectiveness. The CRI-TAC will be built around the philosophy that local involvement and accountability are important for ensuring that agencies are able to meet the needs and expectations of their communities and are prepared for the diverse challenges facing law enforcement today. Recognizing that assistance cannot be prescriptive in nature, CRI-TAC technical assistance will be tailored to each agency, in order to provide effective solutions able to meet unique community needs. In addition, the CRI-TAC will develop a resource hub to support law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve.

While the award will go to the IACP, a powerful coalition will be formed to bring together public safety leaders and will touch nearly every sector of the law enforcement field. The law enforcement associations formally involved in the project, include:

  • Fraternal Order of Police (FOP)
  • Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA)
  • National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE)
  • International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigations National Academy Associates (FBINAA)
  • International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST)
  • National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA)

The CRI-TAC subject matter coalition will provide subject matter expertise; share resources and training materials for use in technical assistance delivery; and contribute to outreach, marketing, and membership engagement.

from https://theiacpblog.org