Children Exposed to Crime Rarely Get Needed Services: Study

Children are more deeply affected by crime, both directly and indirectly, than previously realized, a sobering new research paper from University of Pennsylvania Law School has found. And while most states provide services for children affected by crime, a world-class bureaucratic labyrinth makes it extremely difficult for anyone, particularly parents who are not highly educated, to access these programs. Yet not providing counseling and other help for these children is a step almost certain to cause more lasting damage both […]

Children are more deeply affected by crime, both directly and indirectly, than previously realized, a sobering new research paper from University of Pennsylvania Law School has found.

And while most states provide services for children affected by crime, a world-class bureaucratic labyrinth makes it extremely difficult for anyone, particularly parents who are not highly educated, to access these programs.

Yet not providing counseling and other help for these children is a step almost certain to cause more lasting damage both to the helpless minors and to society in the long term.

The study, conducted by Michal Gilad, looked at five categories of impact across 50 states: children’s being directly victimized by crime, witnessing crime in the family, witnessing crime in the community, parents being hurt by crime, and parents being incarcerated. While no one thinks that a crime committed against a child won’t cause psychological harm, the report found that even indirect exposure, such as witnessing violence in the community, damages children because of the plasticity of their developing brains and lack of emotional maturity.

“The documented harm ranges from physical and mental health problems to increased risk for learning disabilities, behavioral problems, repeat victimization, juvenile delinquency, adult criminality, and substance abuse,” writes Gilad.

Moreover, the problem is much more widespread than most people may think. The study found that “nearly half of the minor children living in the United States today” have been victimized or exposed to crime in their home or community each year.

And yet, “even when identified, only a minuscule minority ever receive services or treatment to facilitate recovery.” While Gilad was surprised and heartened to discover through a newly designed survey that in the majority of the 50 states, services are in place to help children in four of the five crime-impact categories (the exception being children of incarcerated parents), an extremely challenging bureaucratic labyrinth exists.

Even in conducting the survey for his report, Gilad found that contact information for agencies serving children was hard to come by with phone numbers and emails withheld reportedly for security reasons and “phone contact frequently proved to be futile, as the caller seeking information is transferred from one person to another until reaching a dead end, usually a voice mail filled to capacity.”

In a disturbingly large number of cases, once Gilad was able to communicate with an agency worker, there was lack of awareness of statutorily mandated victim-assistance funds for necessary services. Lack of coordination, and stakeholders not speaking the same language, was apparent.

This report poses the chilling scenario: “Imagine a child in desperate need for assistance to overcome trauma in this environment. The child must depend almost solely on a lay parent with no professional skills, and often with only minimal education and resources, to go through the daunting journey through the thorny terrain of the system.”

The difficulty in finding out how to help children victimized by crime raises the possibility that “these persistent and reoccurring system design flaws and administrative roadblocks are not entirely coincidental,” and are saving states money in the short term, the report says.

“Unfortunately, an evidence-based examination of the problem indicates that such short-term savings are likely to result in epic long-term costs borne by tax payers and society,” Gilad writes.

This summary was prepared by TCR Deputy Web Editor Nancy Bilyeau. A full copy of the report can be obtained here. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Chijon family: The Korean Cannibal Family

Chijon family: The Korean Cannibal Family

  • The hatred for the rich of society was so intense that the theu would do anything to bring them down — even cannibalism.
  • The family was sentenced to death for murdering five people with the only regret that they had not killed.

I’m interested

Chijon family: The Korean Cannibal Family

  • The hatred for the rich of society was so intense that the theu would do anything to bring them down -- even cannibalism.
  • The family was sentenced to death for murdering five people with the only regret that they had not killed.

Kim Ki-hwan was a South Korean ex convict who had so much grudge against the rich of the society in his days. He had an unprecedented intense hatred for the rich of society and was so begrudged against them that he would do anything to bring them down.

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from https://www.bizarrepedia.com/

Can Communities Control Crime? The Baltimore Experiment

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Can Communities Control Crime? The Baltimore Experiment

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

The History of Austin: Music Paradise Once Controlled by Gangsters

The History of Austin: Music Paradise Once Controlled by Gangsters

  • The Live Music Capital of the World wasn’t always this way, it once also had a thriving crime scene.

I’m interested

The History of Austin: Music Paradise Once Controlled by Gangsters

  • The Live Music Capital of the World wasn't always this way, it once also had a thriving crime scene.

Many people call Austin the “Live Music Capital of the World.” A cosmopolitan city of politicians, enlightened college students, and free-thinking citizens, the city sits like an oasis in the heart of the otherwise conservative preferences of the state of Texas. Beloved for its creative edge, it might surprise you to know that this thriving town wasn’t always this way.

In the 1960s, Tim Overton, an ex-college football player, became known as the Godfather, for controlling a gang of unsavory characters from the wrong side of town. Local musicians, lawyers, and politicians became inextricably linked to their illegal activity because they all had a penchant for the same pastimes.

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from https://www.bizarrepedia.com/

Top Months for Violent and Property Crime

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Top Months for Violent and Property Crime

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Crime Victimization Increases for the Elderly-Women and Disabled. Why?

Subtitles Criminal victimization increases for older Americans, women and the disabled. Arrests for the older Americans and women increase. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. […]

Subtitles Criminal victimization increases for older Americans, women and the disabled. Arrests for the older Americans and women increase. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Crime Victimization Increases for the Elderly-Women and Disabled. Why?

Subtitles Criminal victimization increases for older Americans, women and the disabled. Arrests for the older Americans and women increase. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. […]

Subtitles Criminal victimization increases for older Americans, women and the disabled. Arrests for the older Americans and women increase. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Violence Encroaches on Mexican Tourism Meccas

Violent crime is on the rise in the tourism hot spots of Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum, jeopardizing a $20 billion-a-year business that attracts millions of American visitors.

USA Today reports that violent crime is encroaching on the Mexican tourism hot spots of Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum, jeopardizing a $20 billion-a-year business that attracts millions of visitors lured by the white sand beaches, archaeological ruins and pulsing nightlife. Although the crime wave so far is mostly limited to areas outside the resorts where tourists stay, Cancun shows signs of following the ill-fated path of Acapulco. That city was once the granddaddy of Mexican tourist destinations, but now is one of country’s deadliest areas and no longer a mecca for international travelers.

Crime and violence between rival drug gangs has surged throughout Mexico, creeping into other popular destinations, such as Los Cabos on the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula. Homicides there are up 400 percent so far this year, underscored by the discovery of 14 bodies in a mass grave in June. The spike in violence comes as Mexico welcomed a record 35 million foreign visitors in 2016, up nearly 9 percent from the previous year. Tourism officials acknowledge the problems plaguing tourist towns: low wages, inadequate housing for workers and increased crime. Quintana Roo state, where Cancun is located, recorded 133 murders in the first six months of 2017, more than double the total for all of last year.

from https://thecrimereport.org