Messy Data Muddle Picture of Hate Crime Increase

Thanks to giant gaps in police data, the FBI’s new report showing a big jump in hate crimes is probably a better gauge of increased but still vastly undercounted crime reports than of an actual increase in the crimes.

Roughly a thousand more police agencies submitted data to the FBI for its annual hate-crimes report than those that did the previous year, The New York Times reports. Even so, hate crimes remain vastly underreported. Only 12.6 percent of the agencies in the FBI report indicated that hate crimes had occurred in their jurisdictions in 2017. Agencies as large as the Miami and Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Departments reported zero, the Times reports. And so the report’s widely publicized conclusions — showing a 17 percent over 2016, with more than 7,100 incidents — are probably a better gauge of increased but incomplete reporting than of an actual increase in the crimes. “I wouldn’t feel too confident in those numbers,” said Sim J. Singh, the senior advocacy manager for the Sikh Coalition, a civil rights organization.

Data shows that hate crime victims often do not trust that reporting will help them. The F.B.I. said it planned to train law enforcement officers next year on how to do a better job of identifying and reporting bias-motivated incidents. The Justice Department has also launched a new website on hate crimes. Will Johnson, the chief of police in Arlington, Tex., and a vice president of International Association of Chiefs of Police, said that some departments lack the proper training for identifying and reporting hate crimes. “More importantly than anything else is the effective conversation and heightened awareness in communities that this is important and that government institutions are prepared to respond effectively to crimes that victimize broadly across our communities,” Chief Johnson said.

from https://thecrimereport.org

60% of Hate Crimes are Racially Motivated: FBI

The majority of hate crime victims last year were targeted because of the offenders’ race, ethnicity, and/or ancestry bias, according to an FBI report released Tuesday

The majority of hate crime victims last year were targeted because of the offenders’ race, ethnicity, and/or ancestry bias, according to an FBI report released Tuesday.

The FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program analyzed data collected in 2017 by 16,149 law enforcement agencies that included information about hate crime offenses, victims, offenders, and locations where such incidents happen.

The report,  Hate Crime Statistics 2017,  classified 7,175 criminal incidents and 8,437 related offenses as being motivated by bias toward race, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender, and gender identity.

About 21 percent of victims were targeted because of the offenders’ religious bias. Last month 46-year-old Robert Gregory Bowers was charged with 29 federal crimes in the aftermath of a mass shooting killed 11 people and injured six others during worship service at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

According to report, about 16 percent were victimized because of the offenders’ sexual-orientation bias,  and most hate crime incidents occurred in or near residences/homes, according to the report.

Though the FBI report adds a glimpse to hate crime in the United States, the report isn’t definitive on whether such crimes are rising or falling. A recent study found that even though hate crimes are surging globally—the United States included—they are drastically underreported as many victims believe their reports won’t be taken seriously by law enforcement and that police officers rather solve other crimes like robberies, murder, etc.

Furthermore, the FBI report yields incomplete data as reporting is voluntary and not all jurisdictions submitted data though nearly 1,000 more agencies reported in 2017 than the previous year.

The full report can be found here.

J. Gabriel Ware is a TCR News Intern.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Is The Rise in Property Crime Related To Criminal Justice Reform?

Highlights There is a rare increase in property crime. Some suggest that it’s the result of criminal justice reform. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention […]

The post Is The Rise in Property Crime Related To Criminal Justice Reform? appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Highlights There is a rare increase in property crime. Some suggest that it’s the result of criminal justice reform. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Does The US Have The Highest Rates For Violent Crime?

Introduction A reader insists that the United States has the world’s highest rates of crime and violence and takes me to task for not saying so. That’s not surprising due to the incessant coverage of crime and mass shootings by local and national media. There are many nations where the crime problem is much worse. […]

The post Does The US Have The Highest Rates For Violent Crime? appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Introduction A reader insists that the United States has the world’s highest rates of crime and violence and takes me to task for not saying so. That’s not surprising due to the incessant coverage of crime and mass shootings by local and national media. There are many nations where the crime problem is much worse. […]

The post Does The US Have The Highest Rates For Violent Crime? appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Controlling Crime Through Media and Public Relations

Highlights Law enforcement and justice agencies get to tell their story through proactive media and public relations. We decide how our story is told. We are no longer dependant on the media. This is revolutionary! The public needs to be involved and take ownership of crime problems. Editor’s Note I am doing a seminar on […]

The post Controlling Crime Through Media and Public Relations appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Highlights Law enforcement and justice agencies get to tell their story through proactive media and public relations. We decide how our story is told. We are no longer dependant on the media. This is revolutionary! The public needs to be involved and take ownership of crime problems. Editor’s Note I am doing a seminar on […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Violent and Property Crime Increases Per USDOJ

Police Van Highlights Violent crime increased for a variety of categories. Property crime saw the first increase since 2013. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention […]

The post Violent and Property Crime Increases Per USDOJ appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Police Van Highlights Violent crime increased for a variety of categories. Property crime saw the first increase since 2013. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

‘No Significant Change’ in Overall Violent Crime: Study

Violent crime against young adult males has increased, but there was no “statistically significant change” in the overall number of Americans who experienced violent crime, according to the most recent estimates from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).

Violent crime against young adult males has increased, but there was no “statistically significant change” in the overall number of Americans who experienced violent crime, according to the most recent estimates from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).

In a report released Wednesday by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), the rate of violent criminal victimizations against males 12 years or older increased from 15.9 per 1,000 males to 19.6 per 1,000 from 2015 to 2016.

The report, based on revised estimates of criminal victimization from the 2016 NCVS, found that  among persons ages 25 to 34, violent victimizations increased from 21.8 to 28.4 per 1,000 persons over the same period.

The BJS also noted that the number of U.S. residents age 12 or older who reported they had experienced one or more violent criminal victimizations during the prior six months increased from 2.7 million to 2.9 million, but added “there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of overall violent victimization (18.6 compared to 19.7 per 1,000 persons age 12 or older).

Moreover, although the rate of aggravated assault increased slightly nationwide for all U.S. residents, the rate of rape or sexual assault decreased from 2015 to 2016 from 1.6 to 1.1 victimizations per 1,000 persons, BJS reported.

Property crimes reported to NCVS increased over the same period, from 110.7 to 118.6 victimizations per 1,000 households, the BJS said, estimating a total number of 15.8 million incidents.

The report, “Criminal Victimization, 2016: Revised (NCJ 252121),” was written by BJS statisticians Rachel E. Morgan, Ph.D., and Grace Kena.

The report can be downloaded here.  Related documents and additional information about BJS’s statistical publications and programs can be found on the BJS website at www.bjs.gov.

from https://thecrimereport.org

How Accurate Are FBI’s Estimated Crime Data?

Some police agencies report no data for the FBI’s annual report of reported U.S. crime. Should the agency report margins of error?

Every year, more than 18,000 police agencies are asked to submit crime data to the FBI. Some don’t provide complete information or any information at all. When that happens, the FBI uses crude estimates to account for the missing data, the Wall Street Journal reports. Those figures are then used to generate “Crime in the United States,”an annual tally of violent and property crimes that is a quality-of-life measure as well as a gauge of criminal justice policies and spending. In most instances, the estimates don’t stray substantially from the submitted numbers.

In its latest report, the FBI didn’t adjust the counts of reported violent crime for 11 states at all. It inflated Indiana’s numbers by 9.9 percent, West Virginia’s by 13 percent and Mississippi’s by 68 percent raising that state’s count to an estimated 8,526, up from a reported 5,084. Homicides showed similar discrepancies. The numbers for 28 states were not adjusted, but Mississippi’s count was increased by 56 perceent to an estimated 245 murders from a reported 157. Jeff Asher, a crime analyst based in New Orleans, argues the agency should publish margins of error with its numbers. James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University, said the numbers are close enough to evaluate trends over multiple years. “The problem is looking one year to the next,” he said. “Don’t get hung up on the year-to-year changes.” Others believe the FBI should use a more sophisticated system for generating estimates. Two decades ago,  the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics published a 78-page paper critiquing the FBI’s procedure and recommending ways to improve it. “So far, nothing has come of it,” said Michael Maltz of Ohio State University, who wrote the paper. Alicia Carriquiry, a statistician at Iowa State University, suggests devising a system that would take advantage of all of available data, not only across agencies but across time.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Police-Civilian Contacts Dip, Blacks More Likely to Experience Physical Force: Study

The number of U.S. residents who had some form of encounter with police dropped from 26 percent to 21 percent between 2011-2015, according to a Bureau of Justice Statistics study. But criminologist Rick Rosenfeld says the data doesn’t necessarily support the so-called “Ferguson Effect” theory that police are withdrawing services in response to anti-cop protests.

Whites are more likely than African-Americans to experience some form of contact with law enforcement, but when police initiate the encounter, blacks are more likely to experience “the threat or use of physical force,” according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).

The BJS study, based on four years of data between 2011-2015, found that the percentage of U.S. residents over 16 who had some form of police encounter had slipped from 26 percent to 21 percent—or from nearly 63 million people to 53.5 million people.

“The number of persons who had contact that was police-initiated fell by eight million, and the number of persons who initiated contact with police dropped by more than nine million people,” the study said.

Although the period of the study includes the 2014 unrest following the fatal police shooting of an unarmed African-American teen in Ferguson, MO—and what some police authorities say was a withdrawal by police from street arrests in response to community anti-police protests (the so-called “Ferguson effect”)—the figures do not necessarily corroborate those assertions.

“We don’t know whether contacts fell after Ferguson and ensuing events or had been decreasing since 2011,” said criminologist Rick Rosenfeld, Founders Professor at the University of Missouri-St.Louis, and a leading national authority on crime control policy.

“Annual data on police contacts are needed to show any relationship with the controversy over police violence.”

Rosenfeld noted that arrest rates had also dropped in 2015, but “they were declining well before the Ferguson incident.”

The BJS study found that whites (23 percent) were slightly more likely than blacks (20 percent) or Hispanics (17 percent) to have had contact with police during 2015.

But the figures also showed that blacks and Hispanics were more than twice as likely (5.2 per cent and 5.1 percent respectively) to experience the threat or use of physical force by cops than whites (2.4 percent).

About two percent of those who experienced police contact experienced a nonfatal threat or use of force by law enforcement, ranging from being pushed, hit or kicked to having a gun pointed at them, and a majority (84 percent) found it “excessive,” the study said.

The most common reason for police-initiated contact (8.6 percent) was a traffic stop, according to the study—most often for speeding.

According to the findings, females were more likely to initiate contact with police than males.

In another notable finding, residents of cities with a population of at least one million were less likely to have contact with police than residents of cities or towns with a population fewer than 100,000.

The report was written by BJS statisticians Elizabeth Davis and Anthony Whyde, and former BJS statistician Lynn Langdon, Ph.D.

The complete study can be downloaded here.

This summary was prepared with reports from Stephen Handelman, Editor of The Crime Report, and Ted Gest, TCR Washingtron bureau chief.

from https://thecrimereport.org

National Violent Crime Remains Consistent

Highlights Violent crime remains flat. Many cities continue to be plagued by violence. 78 percent of Americans worry about crime and violence a great deal or a fair amount. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by […]

The post National Violent Crime Remains Consistent appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Highlights Violent crime remains flat. Many cities continue to be plagued by violence. 78 percent of Americans worry about crime and violence a great deal or a fair amount. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by […]

The post National Violent Crime Remains Consistent appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net