What Causes Violent Crime? New Video

What causes violent crime in the United States? What are the factors contributing to violent crime?  What are the root causes? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing one of the most requested articles on the website. For a complete understanding of the top factors driving violent crime, see Factors Contributing to Violence. […]

What causes violent crime in the United States? What are the factors contributing to violent crime?  What are the root causes? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing one of the most requested articles on the website. For a complete understanding of the top factors driving violent crime, see Factors Contributing to Violence. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Juveniles And Violent Crime

Subtitles Per the FBI: Out of 4,608,000 offenders arrested or connected to a crime, 465,000 were juveniles with 697,000 unknown. Per the Bureau of Justice Statistics: During 2004–13, adolescents made up 10 percent of the U.S. population age 12 or older but were offenders in 22 percent of all nonfatal violent victimizations. Author By Leonard […]

Subtitles Per the FBI: Out of 4,608,000 offenders arrested or connected to a crime, 465,000 were juveniles with 697,000 unknown. Per the Bureau of Justice Statistics: During 2004–13, adolescents made up 10 percent of the U.S. population age 12 or older but were offenders in 22 percent of all nonfatal violent victimizations. Author By Leonard […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Another Fact-Check of Crime Rates Finds Trump Is Wrong

Why do the president and his new attorney general keep repeating statements about crime that are plainly false? They want to make the country feel less safe so Trump can sell some of his policies, such as the border wall and Muslim ban, according to one crime expert.

With a series of charts and data, the Minneapolis Star Tribune attempts to fact-check the relentless assertions by President Trump that violent crime in America has increased. Like many others, the paper finds the opposite is true–that crime has been on a steep decline since the 1990s and is at its lowest points in decades, with some localized exceptions. That fact is important because Trump has the power to drive the national conversation and influence criminal justice policy. Those policies can come at a steep cost to the taxpayers; the War on Drugs is estimated to have cost more than $1 trillion. “If you start with bad facts, you’re going to get bad policies that might make the country less safe, that might strain relationships further between police and communities of color, that send more people to prison for little reason,” said Ames Grawert of the Brennan Center for Justice in New York.

Grawert says Trump’s crime assertions are plainly false. He said he believes the Trump administration is purposely overstating the problem of violent crime to generate support for policies like the border wall and the travel ban. “They only make sense as an overreaction to a clear-and-present danger,” he said. “So I think he needs to make the country feel less safe than it is to sell some of these policies.” Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ media office declined to comment or to provide an alternative data source to support Trump’s statements.

from http://thecrimereport.org

Needed: Better National, Local Data on Shootings

President Trump yesterday ordered an evaluation of the “availability and adequacy of crime-related data,” and ways to improve data collection that “will aid in the understanding of crime trends and in the reduction of crime.” Better data would be a welcome development, says crime statistics analyst Jeff Asher.

President Trump yesterday ordered a task force yet to be created to evaluate the “availability and adequacy of crime-related data,” and identify ways to improve data collection that “will aid in the understanding of crime trends and in the reduction of crime.” Better data would be a welcome development, crime statistics analyst Jeff Asher writes in The Trace.. The public’s perceptions of crime often differ from the realities of the problem at a local, state and national level.

Firearms were used in 71.5 percent of homicides nationwide in 2015. In urban areas, it’s closer to 90 percent. There remains a serious information deficit about where shootings occur and who is affected. Asher says. Federal statistics on gun violence are imprecise. At the local level, data collection isn’t much better. Many major  cities don’t even track shootings as a distinct crime category. While the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report does provide national statistics on the types of weapons used in murders and assaults, it does not break down to the city level. Additionally, assaults include instances where an individual is shot at but not injured, which have a tendency to be badly under-reported. Some cities, like Chicago and Louisville, take it upon themselves to count shootings, though their reports won’t make it to the  FBI. Others, like Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, and St. Louis, produce publicly available daily murder counts. New Orleans makes a log of all 911 calls available online for public review, and Milwaukee produces data-rich assessments of gun violence patterns.

from http://thecrimereport.org

Is Violent Crime Increasing in the United States? New Video

Is violent crime increasing in the United States? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing the most popular article on the website. For a complete understanding of crime in America, see Violent and Property Crime in the US–Crime in America. For a shorter article addressing most recent increases in crime, see Violent Crime Increased […]

Is violent crime increasing in the United States? This is a new video from Crime in America.Net addressing the most popular article on the website. For a complete understanding of crime in America, see Violent and Property Crime in the US–Crime in America. For a shorter article addressing most recent increases in crime, see Violent Crime Increased […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

High Percentages of Older People Sentenced to Prison

Observations Older individuals are being sentenced to prison at fairly high percentages. Can we assume that older people sentenced have been before the courts too many times for serious crimes? Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department […]

Observations Older individuals are being sentenced to prison at fairly high percentages. Can we assume that older people sentenced have been before the courts too many times for serious crimes? Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Trump Was Wrong on Philadelphia Murder Trend

Mayor Jim Kenney called President Trump a purveyor of “fake facts” when Trump said murders in Philadelphia were “terribly increasing.” In fact, the city had 277 homicides last year compared with 280 the year before, and the total used to be much higher.

President Trump was wrong when he said yesterday that Philadelphia’s murder rate has been “steady, I mean, just terribly increasing,” the Philadelphia Inquirer reports. Visiting the city for a meeting with Republicans, Trump singled out Philadelphia when he commented that in the nation’s 30 largest cities, “In the last year alone, the murder rate has increased by an estimated 14 percent.” The most accurate interpretation of his remarks about Philadelphia would be to say the murder rate last year was steady, says the Inquirer. In 2015, the murder rate was about 17.86 per 100,000 residents; In 2016, it was about 17.41 per 100,000 residents. Mayor Jim Kenney called Trump a purveyor of “fake facts”

Although 2015 and 2016 had higher murder rates than 2013 and 2014, the earlier two years had the lowest murder rates the city had seen in decades. Annual murder totals have also not been increasing. In 2016, the city had 277 homicides, compared with 280 a year earlier. While 2013 and 2014 had lower totals, all four years have been historically low compared with previous decades, when murder totals almost always topped 300, and in 1990 reached 500. The city has had an unusually deadly January. As of 12:01 a.m. yesterday, the city had recorded 27 homicides. That is the highest total since 2012.  “We never look at short-term trends in homicide because it’s difficult to intepret,” said Jerry Ratcliffe, a professor of criminal justice at Temple University. “Anybody sensible steers clear [of] trying to put an interpretation on figures when they’re that small.”

 

 

from http://thecrimereport.org

Crime Victims by Age Widespread-Those Age 66 and Above Have High Numbers

Subtitles Those age 66 and above have the highest raw numbers for burglary-breaking and entering and other categories. Violent crime is concentrated for victims in the 16-35 age brackets, but the numbers are at (or close to) 100,000 victimizations for those age 11-50. That’s a remarkable spread for criminal victimization. Author By Leonard A. Sipes, […]

Subtitles Those age 66 and above have the highest raw numbers for burglary-breaking and entering and other categories. Violent crime is concentrated for victims in the 16-35 age brackets, but the numbers are at (or close to) 100,000 victimizations for those age 11-50. That’s a remarkable spread for criminal victimization. Author By Leonard A. Sipes, […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Violent Crime Increased in 2016-Is America Entering a New Era of Violence?

For the best overview of Crime in the United States and links to recent reports, see Crime Over Time-Crime in America. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

For the best overview of Crime in the United States and links to recent reports, see Crime Over Time-Crime in America. Author Leonard A. Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National […]

Violent Crime Reports Up 5.3% in First Half of 2016

FBI report says violent crimes reported to local police rose in the first half of last year in every category of violent crime. Violent incidents are up the most in cities with populations of more than 1 million. Property crime dropped slightly but motor vehicle thefts rose 6.6 percent.

Violent crime reports around the U.S. increased by 5.3 percent in the first six months of last year compared with the same period in 2015, the FBI reported today. Each offense in the violent crime category went up: murders by 5.2 percent, robberies 3.2 percent, rapes by 3.5 percent (under the FBI’s modernized definition), and aggravated assaults 6.5 percent.

Among cities, violent crime rose the most over the previous year (9.7 percent) in places with populations of 1,000,000 and over. Property crime overall dropped 0.6 percent during the period, with burglaries down 3.4 percent and larceny-thefts were down 0.8 percent, but motor vehicle thefts increased by 6.6 percent. The data are based on reports to local law enforcement agencies.

from http://thecrimereport.org