Crime, Pessimism, Baltimore And Past Lessons

Observations Do current events influence our ability to lead and to see things clearly? Success won’t come from the media or advocates or the criminological community; it will come from the women and men of the justice system. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed […]

Observations Do current events influence our ability to lead and to see things clearly? Success won’t come from the media or advocates or the criminological community; it will come from the women and men of the justice system. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Why Do We Lie About Crime?

Observation Is dishonesty an inherent part of crime discussions? Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. Post-Masters’ […]

Observation Is dishonesty an inherent part of crime discussions? Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. Post-Masters’ […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Why Do We Lie About Increasing Violence?

Observations It’s so obvious that violent crime is increasing that when I’m told otherwise, I get nauseous. Note: Crime reports for the United States for all of 2016 will be offered in September and October. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by […]

Observations It’s so obvious that violent crime is increasing that when I’m told otherwise, I get nauseous. Note: Crime reports for the United States for all of 2016 will be offered in September and October. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Criminologist Issues Database on Crimes by Police

Philip Stinson of Bowling Green University published a police crime database offering the most comprehensive look ever at how often U.S. cops are arrested. The dataset includes 8,006 arrest incidents resulting in 13,623 charges involving 6,596 police officers from 2005 through 2012, with more years of data to come.

Criminologist Philip Stinson of Bowling Green University has published an extensive police crime database offering the most comprehensive look ever at how often U.S. cops are arrested, as well as some early insights into the consequences they face for breaking the laws they’re supposed to enforce, Vice reports. The dataset includes 8,006 arrest incidents resulting in 13,623 charges involving 6,596 police officers from 2005 through 2012, with more years of data to come. Nearly half these incidents were violent. The data cover 2,830 state, local, and special law enforcement agencies across all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. That’s a small fraction of the 18,000 law enforcement agencies and 1.1 million sworn officers in the U.S., so the data set is not comprehensive, but it’s the most extensive and ambitious look at cop crime to date.

“It’s not as rare as you might think. It happens at all stages of officers’ careers, and at all ranks,” Stinson said. Police misconduct — and seeming impunity — has drawn increasing scrutiny since the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Mo. Stinson’s database is the only public effort that attempts to track all alleged crimes by police. The federal government doesn’t collect data on most arrests or convictions of police officers. Stinson tracks these incidents using a combination of media reports and court records. His data indicate about 1,000 officer arrests per year over the eight years of the data set, and nearly 1,140 arrests per year from 2008 through 2012. That doesn’t necessarily mean that police crime has increased since 2005, or gotten more violent. Stinson’s methodology has become more sophisticated, and it’s possible the data could change because of variations in the search algorithms he uses to find cases.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Baltimore May Pass New York City in Homicides

New York, with a population of 8.5 million, had 182 homicides as of Sept. 3. Baltimore, a city of under 620,000, was already at 238 victims as of that date.

For the first time, Baltimore is on track to surpass New York City in homicides, a grim feat once considered inconceivable, the Baltimore Sun reports. New York, which has a population of 8.5 million, had 182 homicides as of Sept. 3. Baltimore, a city of under 620,000, was already at 238 victims as of that date. The distinction owes more to New York’s stunning decline in crime than Baltimore’s relatively stubborn crime rate.

New York saw more than 2,000 homicides a year in the early 1990s, a figure that tumbled over that decade. Still, just a few years ago, New York’s homicide total topped 500 annually. In 2011, Baltimore recorded fewer than 200 killings for the first time in decades. New York’s murder rate continued to drop, and Baltimore’s spiked, with more than 300 homicides in 2015 and 2016. On a per-capita basis, Baltimore saw 50 killings per 100,000 people in 2016. New York had 3.9 killings per 100,000. New York’s early drop was attributed partly to zero-tolerance policies and statistics-based policing, prompting Baltimore to adopt similar strategies. New York also backed away from controversial stop-and-frisk tactics continues to record big declines.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Sessions Again Cites US Crime Wave; Fact Check Calls It a Lie

The U.S. attorney general once again drum-thumped about lawlessness this week, telling a police convention in Nashville that “violent crime is back with a vengeance.” The Washington Post says he is being duplicitous–“stoking American’s fears about crime and safety to advance a political agenda of ‘law and order.’”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions this week resumed his drum-thumping about American lawlessness, telling a police union convention in Nashville that “violent crime is back with a vengeance.” Except that it’s not, according to the Washington Post Fact Checker. Experts say crime in America is at historically low levels, and the Fact Checker presented Sessions with its highest “whopper” rating of four Pinnochios. It concluded, “Sessions’ claims about crime across the country are a distortion of the facts. Nationwide, the violent crime rate and the murder rate are lower than they have been in almost 45 years.”

Fact Checker said he applies the same distortion in his spotlighting of crime in major cities, using Chicago as an example of rising violence even though a rudimentary understanding of data shows it to be an outlier that is out of sync with national trends. The Post concludes, “With every dramatic assertion, Session is stoking American’s fears about crime and safety to advance a political agenda of ‘law and order.’”

from https://thecrimereport.org

Can Communities Control Crime? The Baltimore Experiment

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Can Communities Control Crime? The Baltimore Experiment

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

Subtitles “Are you saying you can’t keep your hood safe?” Cops want communities to take responsibility for their own crime problems. Gang members called Ceasefire organizers to say they would not engage in violence, Bridgeford said. Corner boys said their blocks would stay quiet. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Top Months for Violent and Property Crime

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

from http://www.crimeinamerica.net

Top Months for Violent and Property Crime

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

Subtitle June and warm weather months have the most crime. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse. Former Director of Information Services, National Crime Prevention Council. […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net