Criminals And Guns-Why Cops Are Concerned

Highlights A very high percentage of violent offenders use or carry firearms per federal sources. What this means for police-involved shootings and public policy. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former […]

The post Criminals And Guns-Why Cops Are Concerned appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Highlights A very high percentage of violent offenders use or carry firearms per federal sources. What this means for police-involved shootings and public policy. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former […]

The post Criminals And Guns-Why Cops Are Concerned appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

26 Million Victims of Identity Theft-93 Percent Without Police Involvement

Highlights Increasing numbers of Americans are victimized by identity theft, far more than any other crime. From the victim perspective, police involvement is minimal. It’s as if we have returned to the time of the Pinkertons. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state […]

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Highlights Increasing numbers of Americans are victimized by identity theft, far more than any other crime. From the victim perspective, police involvement is minimal. It’s as if we have returned to the time of the Pinkertons. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Violent Crime Increasing in the US

Highlights Violent crime is increasing. For the National Crime Survey, most of the sixteen categories of violent crime rates increased from 2015 to 2017. First of a three-part series on crime in America. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

The post Violent Crime Increasing in the US appeared first on Crime in America.Net.

Highlights Violent crime is increasing. For the National Crime Survey, most of the sixteen categories of violent crime rates increased from 2015 to 2017. First of a three-part series on crime in America. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Retired federal senior spokesperson. Thirty-five years of award-winning public relations for national and state criminal justice agencies. […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Federal Courts Getting Tougher on Sex Offenders: Report

The number of sex offenders convicted in the federal criminal justice system nearly doubled between 2010 and 2016, and sex offenders were more frequently convicted of an offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty during that period, according to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Federal courts are taking an increasingly tougher line against sex offenders, according to data released by the United States Sentencing Commission.

The number of sex offenders convicted in the federal criminal justice system nearly doubled between 2010 and 2016, and sex offenders were more frequently convicted of an offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty during that period, the Commission reported.

While individuals convicted of a sex offense comprised only 4.2 percent of overall federal offenders during fiscal year 2016—up from 3.2 percent in 2010—the number of persons convicted on sexual abuse charges went from 639 to 1,148 in the six-year period covered by the report.

At the same time, the percentage of convicted federal sex offenders who received mandatory minimum sentences “increased substantially” from 21 percent in 2004 to over 63 percent in 2016, the Commission said.

Sex offenses as a percentage of all federal convictions carrying a mandatory minimum penalty also increased, to over 19 percent in 2016.

The data was published in the sixth and final part of the Commission’s series investigating the use of federal mandatory minimum penalties.

The federal government prosecutes two types of sex offenses: sexual abuse or “contact” offenses that involve actual sexual contact with a victim regardless of age; and child pornography offenses.  An offense related to the production of pornography depicting an actual child is also considered a “contact” offense.

Mandatory minimum penalties for sex offenses have been generally applied less often in the federal system compared to other mandatory minimum penalties.

The Commission reported that although the number of child pornography offenders has remained “relatively stable” between 2010 and 2016, the percentage of child pornography offenders convicted of an offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty increased, from 50.2 percent in fiscal year 2010 to a high of 61.2 percent in 2014, before leveling off to 59.6 percent in fiscal 2016.

Convicted child pornographers accounted for 5.1 percent of the federal prison population as of Sept. 30, 2016.

Sex offenders in both categories received tougher penalties than others convicted under mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines.

The average sentence for offenders convicted of a sexual abuse offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty was nearly three times longer than the average sentence for offenders convicted of a sexual abuse offense not carrying a mandatory minimum penalty (252 months compared to 86 months), the Commission said.

Child pornographers with a prior sex conviction automatically face a ten-year mandatory minimum penalty.

The data showed that sex offenders are demographically different than other offenders.

For instance, Native American offenders comprised a larger percentage of sexual abuse offenders than of any other offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty. They constituted 11.7 percent of sexual abuse offenders overall and represented the largest portion (28.2 percent) of sexual abuse offenders convicted of an offense not carrying a mandatory minimum penalty.

Notably, in 2016, the average age of sexual abuse offenders was 37, the same as the average age of federal offenders overall. Offenders convicted of a sexual abuse offense and offenders convicted of a sexual abuse offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty were fairly evenly distributed throughout all age brackets, except there were fewer in the “younger than 21” category.

A full copy of the report can be found here.

Megan Hadley is a senior staff writer with The Crime Report.

from https://thecrimereport.org

24% Of American Households Victimized By Crime in 2018

Police Van Highlights 24% of households were victimized by violent or property crimes (excluding cybercrimes) in 2018, up from the 22% who said the same last year. Beyond the 24 percent of households victimized by violent and property crimes, 23% of U.S. households were victimized by cybercrime in 2018. Huge percentages of American households are victimized […]

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Police Van Highlights 24% of households were victimized by violent or property crimes (excluding cybercrimes) in 2018, up from the 22% who said the same last year. Beyond the 24 percent of households victimized by violent and property crimes, 23% of U.S. households were victimized by cybercrime in 2018. Huge percentages of American households are victimized […]

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from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Incarceration Data Reveals ‘Sharp Urban-Rural Divide’ Across US

Sharp disparities between the imprisonment rates of urban and rural Americans illustrate the “new dynamics of mass incarceration” in the U.S., the Vera Institute of Justice said Friday.

Sharp disparities between the imprisonment rates of urban and rural Americans illustrate the “new dynamics of mass incarceration” in the U.S., the Vera Institute of Justice said Friday.

Vera released the latest data from a new tool exploring incarcerations trends, that drills down into prison admission and incarceration rates at the county level, with breakdowns by race and gender, based on 2015 figures.

“The (data) reveal an important truth,” said Jasmine Heiss, director of outreach and public affairs strategist for Vera, in a statement accompanying the report.

“The problem of mass incarceration is in all our backyards.”

The new data shows, for example, that Broome County, a rural region in upstate New York with about 200, 000 residents, sends people to state prison at a rate 45 percent higher than New York City.

Similarly, although the jail population in Oakland, Ca., and the surrounding Alameda County, CA, declined 33 percent between 2011 and 2015, the number of jail inmates in suburban region of San Bernardino increased 20 percent in the same period.

The figures underline what many have already noted as a “rural jail crisis” of overcrowded and outdated facilities, much of it caused by the increase in mentally ill or substance-abuser populations driven by the nation’s opioid epidemic.

The data also showed a sharp racial disparity in New York City, which has experienced some of the deepest and longest sustained reductions in crime, as well as jail populations.

In 2015, African-Americans were jailed in New York City at over ten times the rate of whites—and Latinx at five times the rate, Vera said.

What Vera described as the “sharp urban-suburban divide” in incarceration trends across the U.S. raises serious challenges for policymakers.

Travis County, Tex., where the upscale university and high tech community of Austin is located, saw a reduction of 23 percent in individuals sent to state prison between 2011 and 2015. But in rural McCulloch County, the geographical heart of Texas, the prison incarceration rate increased by more than 45 percent over the same period.

“In McCulloch County, 2.5 percent of working age males were absent from the county in 2015 because they were in the state prison system,” the Vera report said.

The full dataset available is available for download directly from Vera’s Incarceration Trends Project here.

from https://thecrimereport.org

FBI Issues Incident-Based Crime Reporting Data

The Federal Bureau Investigation released data on more than 6 million criminal offenses submitted to its National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) last year. With more-detailed data collection, NIBRS is scheduled to become the national standard for crime reporting in 2021.

The Federal Bureau Investigation released data on more than 6 million criminal offenses submitted to its National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) last year. With more -detailed data collection, NIBRS is scheduled to become the national standard for crime reporting in 2021. The FBI says the new system “offers more context and allows law enforcement agencies to use resources more strategically to prevent and combat crime.” Last year, 6,998 law enforcement agencies reported data to NIBRS. About 42 percent of law enforcement agencies that take part in the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program are submitting their crime data to NIBRS.

FBI director Christopher Wray says the NIBRS data “will give us a more complete picture of what’s really going on in our communities and allow us to do what we need to do to keep people safe.” The NIBRS data released on Monday said that of the 4,524,968 people who were victims of crimes, 23.4 percent were between 21 and 30 years old, and a little more than half were female. More than half (52.2 percent) of victims knew their offenders  but were not related to them. Of 5,266,175 known offenders (meaning at least one characteristic about the person is known, such as age, gender, or race), 1.9 percent were between the ages of 16 and 30. The majority of known criminals (62.4 percent) were men, and 25.5 percent were women.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Average Time Spent in State Prison is 2.6 Years: BJS

In a study of prisoners released in 2016, the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that more than seven in 10 violent offenders spend less than five years in state prisons, and prisoners served an average of 46 percent of their maximum sentence length.

State prisoners had served an average of 2.6 years behind bars when they were released in 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reports.

More than seven in 10 violent offenders released that year had spent less than five years in state prisons, the agency reported.

BJS found that released prisoners in 2016 had served an average of 46 percent of their maximum sentence length.

The percentage of their full sentence that inmates actually served varied considerably by offense type. If they were serving time for rape or sexual assault, inmates served
an average of 62 percent of their sentence.

The figure was only 38 percent of their maximum time if the charge was drug possession.

If the charge was murder or non-negligent, the average time served was 15 years.

Ninety-six percent of violent offenders released in 2016, including 70 percent of those sentenced for murder or non-negligent manslaughter, served less than 20 years before release, BJS said.

About one in five people released in 2016 after being sentenced for rape or sexual assault served 10 or more years before initial release.

Most offenders (59 percent) released from state prison in 2016 after serving time for drug possession served less than one year.

The report was written by BJS statistician Danielle Kaeble.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Average Time Spent in State Prison is 2.6 Years: BJS

In a study of prisoners released in 2016, the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that more than seven in 10 violent offenders spend less than five years in state prisons, and prisoners served an average of 46 percent of their maximum sentence length.

State prisoners had served an average of 2.6 years behind bars when they were released in 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reports.

More than seven in 10 violent offenders released that year had spent less than five years in state prisons, the agency reported.

BJS found that released prisoners in 2016 had served an average of 46 percent of their maximum sentence length.

The percentage of their full sentence that inmates actually served varied considerably by offense type. If they were serving time for rape or sexual assault, inmates served
an average of 62 percent of their sentence.

The figure was only 38 percent of their maximum time if the charge was drug possession.

If the charge was murder or non-negligent, the average time served was 15 years.

Ninety-six percent of violent offenders released in 2016, including 70 percent of those sentenced for murder or non-negligent manslaughter, served less than 20 years before release, BJS said.

About one in five people released in 2016 after being sentenced for rape or sexual assault served 10 or more years before initial release.

Most offenders (59 percent) released from state prison in 2016 after serving time for drug possession served less than one year.

The report was written by BJS statistician Danielle Kaeble.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Messy Data Muddle Picture of Hate Crime Increase

Thanks to giant gaps in police data, the FBI’s new report showing a big jump in hate crimes is probably a better gauge of increased but still vastly undercounted crime reports than of an actual increase in the crimes.

Roughly a thousand more police agencies submitted data to the FBI for its annual hate-crimes report than those that did the previous year, The New York Times reports. Even so, hate crimes remain vastly underreported. Only 12.6 percent of the agencies in the FBI report indicated that hate crimes had occurred in their jurisdictions in 2017. Agencies as large as the Miami and Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Departments reported zero, the Times reports. And so the report’s widely publicized conclusions — showing a 17 percent over 2016, with more than 7,100 incidents — are probably a better gauge of increased but incomplete reporting than of an actual increase in the crimes. “I wouldn’t feel too confident in those numbers,” said Sim J. Singh, the senior advocacy manager for the Sikh Coalition, a civil rights organization.

Data shows that hate crime victims often do not trust that reporting will help them. The F.B.I. said it planned to train law enforcement officers next year on how to do a better job of identifying and reporting bias-motivated incidents. The Justice Department has also launched a new website on hate crimes. Will Johnson, the chief of police in Arlington, Tex., and a vice president of International Association of Chiefs of Police, said that some departments lack the proper training for identifying and reporting hate crimes. “More importantly than anything else is the effective conversation and heightened awareness in communities that this is important and that government institutions are prepared to respond effectively to crimes that victimize broadly across our communities,” Chief Johnson said.

from https://thecrimereport.org