Two years later, mother is still knocking on doors to bring her son’s killer to justice

Techea Adams was working at home the morning her middle son, Kejon Atkins, blew her a kiss and stepped outside their Compton home to go running with a friend. 

“I’d just answered a call from my office, at 11:20 a.m.,” she said. “I’m sitting there on the phone, and I hear all the gunshots. I hear all the helicopters; I watch them circle around, but I never once thought that was my child.”

Moments later, a young neighbor pounded on her door, saying he’d heard from another neighbor that Atkins, 22, had been shot. 

“He said, ‘I tried calling his phone, and this man answered and told me to take my phone to his mother,’ ” she said, “so this boy ran down the street in his underwear to bring his phone to my house, and it was the hospital telling me to hurry up and get down there.”

Atkins, a student and football player at Long Beach Community College, had been shot in the head by a shirtless man in a champagne-colored sedan the morning of July 23, 2015. He held on for four days at the hospital before he was pronounced dead at 2:22 p.m. July 27.

On Friday, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s homicide investigators released surveillance footage of the two cars thought to be involved in Kejon’s shooting. They emphasized that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction the gunman. 

The video shows two cars that appear to be involved in the shooting, a four-door sedan and a maroon-and-gray Pontiac Aztek SUV. The shooter, who had a tattoo on his back, was in the sedan, said Det. Theo Baljet, but the video shows both cars speeding away. 

“They were both obviously driving at a higher-than-normal rate of speed, and they both blew a red light,” Baljet said. “We think they were related.”

Six months after Atkins died, his mother moved out of Compton. She and her brother were raised there, and she’d bought her own home on East 126th Street in 2002, the home where Atkins grew up. But after the shooting, Adams said she couldn’t concentrate in the house anymore. She kept having flashbacks to the day her son was shot, so she and her daughter, Jessica, moved to Santa Clarita.

Family and friends will be back in the old neighborhood on Sunday, July 23, though. Starting at 4 p.m., they’ll retrace the half-block that Atkins walked the morning he was shot, pray and pass out water and leaflets in the hope of getting someone to come forward with information about his killer.

Adams named the march “Take a Walk in My Shoes Before You Judge Me” because she wants to dispel myths about her hometown. 

“I was born and raised in Compton. I have a master’s degree. My brother has a master’s degree. My oldest son has a master’s degree, and my middle son was in college,” she said. “Don’t assume that because I grew up in a certain neighborhood, I’m a gangbanger or a bad person.”

Atkins “wasn’t perfect,” she said, “but he wasn’t bad, and he wasn’t in a gang. He loved football, he loved to travel and he always smiled. That’s what people remembered him by.”

He lived at home, Adams said, and did what he could for his mother and sister, who was 9 when he died.

“He was my helper,” Adams said. “When I got divorced and he started driving, I only had one car, so on my lunch break, I’d get him from school, we’d go to lunch and then he’d have the car. After football practice, he’d pick up his sister from school, go to the park for ice cream and then pick me up at work.”

When he was in college, Atkins made sure his sister got to her gymnastics class at the Lakewood YMCA. “One day, she said, ‘Everybody’s daddy shows up to gymnastics, and I never have anybody show up,’ so after football, he started showing up at the gymnastics place, just so she would have a guy there.”

Adams said she hopes she can increase the reward amount to draw more interest in her son’s case. And she’s determined that people won’t forget about him or his death. 

Her short march will start at 1705 E. 126th St. on Sunday, their old address, and head up 126th toward Wilmington Avenue. Atkins was shot outside Cesar Chavez Continuation School, across the street from the Nehemiah Missionary Baptist Church. Summer school was just getting out, so the area was thick with traffic, Adams said. 

“I just hope somebody comes forward, whether it’s a girlfriend or a family member. Everybody who knows and doesn’t say anything is just as guilty as the person who pulled the trigger,” she said. 

“Most of all, I wish that we as African American and brown people would open our eyes and look at what we’re doing to each other. We’re killing each other. It’s sad, and us parents have to step up.” 

Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff’s Homicide Bureau at (323) 890-5500. Those wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477. 

Photo: Top, Techea Adams and son Kejon Atkins take a photo at LAX a few months before he was shot near their Compton home. 

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

Techea Adams was working at home the morning her middle son, Kejon Atkins, blew her a kiss and stepped outside their Compton home to go running with a friend. 

“I’d just answered a call from my office, at 11:20 a.m.,” she said. “I’m sitting there on the phone, and I hear all the gunshots. I hear all the helicopters; I watch them circle around, but I never once thought that was my child.”

Moments later, a young neighbor pounded on her door, saying he’d heard from another neighbor that Atkins, 22, had been shot. 

“He said, ‘I tried calling his phone, and this man answered and told me to take my phone to his mother,’ ” she said, “so this boy ran down the street in his underwear to bring his phone to my house, and it was the hospital telling me to hurry up and get down there.”

Atkins, a student and football player at Long Beach Community College, had been shot in the head by a shirtless man in a champagne-colored sedan the morning of July 23, 2015. He held on for four days at the hospital before he was pronounced dead at 2:22 p.m. July 27.

On Friday, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s homicide investigators released surveillance footage of the two cars thought to be involved in Kejon’s shooting. They emphasized that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction the gunman. 

The video shows two cars that appear to be involved in the shooting, a four-door sedan and a maroon-and-gray Pontiac Aztek SUV. The shooter, who had a tattoo on his back, was in the sedan, said Det. Theo Baljet, but the video shows both cars speeding away. 

“They were both obviously driving at a higher-than-normal rate of speed, and they both blew a red light,” Baljet said. “We think they were related.”

Six months after Atkins died, his mother moved out of Compton. She and her brother were raised there, and she’d bought her own home on East 126th Street in 2002, the home where Atkins grew up. But after the shooting, Adams said she couldn’t concentrate in the house anymore. She kept having flashbacks to the day her son was shot, so she and her daughter, Jessica, moved to Santa Clarita.

Family and friends will be back in the old neighborhood on Sunday, July 23, though. Starting at 4 p.m., they’ll retrace the half-block that Atkins walked the morning he was shot, pray and pass out water and leaflets in the hope of getting someone to come forward with information about his killer.

Adams named the march “Take a Walk in My Shoes Before You Judge Me” because she wants to dispel myths about her hometown. 

“I was born and raised in Compton. I have a master’s degree. My brother has a master’s degree. My oldest son has a master’s degree, and my middle son was in college,” she said. “Don’t assume that because I grew up in a certain neighborhood, I’m a gangbanger or a bad person.”

Atkins “wasn’t perfect,” she said, “but he wasn’t bad, and he wasn’t in a gang. He loved football, he loved to travel and he always smiled. That’s what people remembered him by.”

He lived at home, Adams said, and did what he could for his mother and sister, who was 9 when he died.

“He was my helper,” Adams said. “When I got divorced and he started driving, I only had one car, so on my lunch break, I’d get him from school, we’d go to lunch and then he’d have the car. After football practice, he’d pick up his sister from school, go to the park for ice cream and then pick me up at work.”

When he was in college, Atkins made sure his sister got to her gymnastics class at the Lakewood YMCA. “One day, she said, ‘Everybody’s daddy shows up to gymnastics, and I never have anybody show up,’ so after football, he started showing up at the gymnastics place, just so she would have a guy there.”

Adams said she hopes she can increase the reward amount to draw more interest in her son’s case. And she’s determined that people won’t forget about him or his death. 

Her short march will start at 1705 E. 126th St. on Sunday, their old address, and head up 126th toward Wilmington Avenue. Atkins was shot outside Cesar Chavez Continuation School, across the street from the Nehemiah Missionary Baptist Church. Summer school was just getting out, so the area was thick with traffic, Adams said. 

“I just hope somebody comes forward, whether it’s a girlfriend or a family member. Everybody who knows and doesn’t say anything is just as guilty as the person who pulled the trigger,” she said. 

“Most of all, I wish that we as African American and brown people would open our eyes and look at what we’re doing to each other. We’re killing each other. It’s sad, and us parents have to step up.” 

Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff's Homicide Bureau at (323) 890-5500. Those wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477. 

Photo: Top, Techea Adams and son Kejon Atkins take a photo at LAX a few months before he was shot near their Compton home. 

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Lancaster man charged in connection with strangulation of repairwoman

The man accused of strangling an Antelope Valley woman who came to fix his refrigerator on July 14 has a history of mental illness and a 2013 conviction for assault and criminal threats against a family member, authorities say.

William Franklin Hughes III, 30, was prescribed medication, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Lt. Joe Mendoza said, “but we don’t know if he was taking” it. 

Hughes was charged July 18 with one count of murder in the strangulation of Lyndi Lee Fisher, a 36-year-old appliance repair technician who went to Hughes’ home four days earlier.

The murder charge includes the allegation that Hughes was convicted in 2013 of making criminal threats, said Ricardo Santiago, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. 

The threats were against his father, William Franklin Hughes, 65, Mendoza said. Hughes also was convicted of assault in that case.

Hughes lives alone in Lancaster in the 43200 block of Doverwood Court, in a home owned by his parents, Mendoza said.

Fisher, a repair technician for Arrow Appliance, went to Hughes’ home about 6 p.m. July 14 for her last job of the day. It was her second visit to the house, and she brought parts to make the repair.

At 11:11 p.m., Hughes called the Sheriff’s Department to report that a woman was unresponsive in his home. When deputies arrived, they found Fisher inside Hughes’ garage, Mendoza said.

Hughes told investigators he had left the house after Fisher arrived, and when he returned, he found her on the floor. 

Fisher, a married mother of three, was pronounced dead at the scene at 11:23 p.m. Mendoza said she suffered blunt force trauma to her head, but the cause of death was ruled as manual strangulation, according to coroner’s records.

Investigators arrested Hughes the following morning, based on evidence found at the scene and conflicting statements he made to detectives, Mendoza said. He in due back in court Aug. 18. 

Fisher’s boss Christy Savoie-Knop, the owner of Arrow Appliance, has started an online fundraising account to help Fisher’s family. Less than a week after the fundraiser began,  it was about $2,000 short of its $20,000 goal. 

Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff’s Homicide Bureau at (323) 890-5500. Those wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477.  

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

The man accused of strangling an Antelope Valley woman who came to fix his refrigerator on July 14 has a history of mental illness and a 2013 conviction for assault and criminal threats against a family member, authorities say.

William Franklin Hughes III, 30, was prescribed medication, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Lt. Joe Mendoza said, “but we don’t know if he was taking” it. 

Hughes was charged July 18 with one count of murder in the strangulation of Lyndi Lee Fisher, a 36-year-old appliance repair technician who went to Hughes’ home four days earlier.

The murder charge includes the allegation that Hughes was convicted in 2013 of making criminal threats, said Ricardo Santiago, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. 

The threats were against his father, William Franklin Hughes, 65, Mendoza said. Hughes also was convicted of assault in that case.

Hughes lives alone in Lancaster in the 43200 block of Doverwood Court, in a home owned by his parents, Mendoza said.

Fisher, a repair technician for Arrow Appliance, went to Hughes’ home about 6 p.m. July 14 for her last job of the day. It was her second visit to the house, and she brought parts to make the repair.

At 11:11 p.m., Hughes called the Sheriff’s Department to report that a woman was unresponsive in his home. When deputies arrived, they found Fisher inside Hughes’ garage, Mendoza said.

Hughes told investigators he had left the house after Fisher arrived, and when he returned, he found her on the floor. 

Fisher, a married mother of three, was pronounced dead at the scene at 11:23 p.m. Mendoza said she suffered blunt force trauma to her head, but the cause of death was ruled as manual strangulation, according to coroner’s records.

Investigators arrested Hughes the following morning, based on evidence found at the scene and conflicting statements he made to detectives, Mendoza said. He in due back in court Aug. 18. 

Fisher’s boss Christy Savoie-Knop, the owner of Arrow Appliance, has started an online fundraising account to help Fisher’s family. Less than a week after the fundraiser began,  it was about $2,000 short of its $20,000 goal. 

Anyone with information is asked to call the sheriff’s Homicide Bureau at (323) 890-5500. Those wishing to remain anonymous should call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477.  

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized

One year later, her son’s killing remains unsolved: ‘It just hurts’

Barbara Pritchett-Hughes can’t believe that more than 365 days have passed since she last saw her oldest son. In many ways, she says, it still doesn’t feel as though he is gone.

On July 17, 2016, she had left her home to celebrate a family member’s birthday. When she returned, her 30-year-old son was dead.

That night about 7:30 p.m., DeAndre Hughes was standing outside the home he shared with his mother in the 900 block of East 120th Street in Green Meadows when he was shot.

Hughes joined his brother 15-year-old old Dovon Harris, at the Inglewood cemetery. Harris was shot and killed in 2007. Their graves are about 10 feet apart.

On Monday, Pritchett-Hughes and more than 20 others went to the cemetery to visit Hughes’ grave. People laughed, played music and talked about how it wasn’t DeAndre’s time.

In the last year, Pritchett-Hughes has moved away from the city she grew up in. She has started a nonprofit foundation in memory of her two sons. And she has become an activist against violence.

All of this has served as a distraction from the fact that the killer in her eldest son’s case has not been found. 

When her first son was shot, suspects were arrested within six days. When the year anniversary approached, she was already going to court.

“It hurts,” she said. “Because I don’t know if the person who did it is looking at me. It hurts.”

On Saturday, Pritchett-Hughes returned to her old neighborhood to march in a walk against violence in honor of her two sons. “It’s not about me,” she told the crowd at Ted Watkins Memorial Park. “It’s about us.”

In the rising heat, the group of about 40 mothers, sisters, brother and fathers walked from the park along South Central Avenue rooting for a cause that has forever changed their lives.

“Stop the violence, Stop the violence!” Pritchett-Hughes shouted in the crowd. She was not the only one in the group who had experienced violent loss.

Shenetha Edwards was there, too. Her husband, Darrell Edwards, 54, was killed nearly two months ago in Westmont. She hasn’t been back to work at her job as a security guard since.

“This has happened to me twice,” she said. In 2005, another father to her children was also shot and killed.

Techea Adams, whose 22-year-old son, Kejon Atkins, was killed nearly two years ago, also came from her home in Santa Clarita. Adams had moved from Willowbrook, the area where her son was killed, to escape the pervasive reminders and trauma of the killing. Since 2015, she has lost her job as a paralegal because she couldn’t concentrate, she said.

At one point, Adams would drive around her old neighborhood, jotting down license plate numbers and car descriptions in an effort to find her son’s killer. Adams is still waiting for the phone call to tell her of an arrest.

“I wish this pain on no mother,” she said.

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @nicolesantacruz and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

Photo, top: Barbara Pritchett-Hughes, center, lost her second son in a shooting one year ago. She has started a new foundation and organized a peace walk for other families who have lost loved ones to violence.

Photo, above right: Techea Adams holds the photo of her 22-year-old son, Kejon Atkins, who was killed in 2015.

Credit: Irfan Khan, Los Angeles Times

Barbara Pritchett-Hughes can’t believe that more than 365 days have passed since she last saw her oldest son. In many ways, she says, it still doesn’t feel as though he is gone.

On July 17, 2016, she had left her home to celebrate a family member’s birthday. When she returned, her 30-year-old son was dead.

That night about 7:30 p.m., DeAndre Hughes was standing outside the home he shared with his mother in the 900 block of East 120th Street in Green Meadows when he was shot.

Hughes joined his brother 15-year-old old Dovon Harris, at the Inglewood cemetery. Harris was shot and killed in 2007. Their graves are about 10 feet apart.

On Monday, Pritchett-Hughes and more than 20 others went to the cemetery to visit Hughes’ grave. People laughed, played music and talked about how it wasn’t DeAndre’s time.

In the last year, Pritchett-Hughes has moved away from the city she grew up in. She has started a nonprofit foundation in memory of her two sons. And she has become an activist against violence.

All of this has served as a distraction from the fact that the killer in her eldest son’s case has not been found. 

When her first son was shot, suspects were arrested within six days. When the year anniversary approached, she was already going to court.

“It hurts,” she said. “Because I don’t know if the person who did it is looking at me. It hurts.”

On Saturday, Pritchett-Hughes returned to her old neighborhood to march in a walk against violence in honor of her two sons. “It’s not about me,” she told the crowd at Ted Watkins Memorial Park. “It’s about us.”

In the rising heat, the group of about 40 mothers, sisters, brother and fathers walked from the park along South Central Avenue rooting for a cause that has forever changed their lives.

“Stop the violence, Stop the violence!” Pritchett-Hughes shouted in the crowd. She was not the only one in the group who had experienced violent loss.

Shenetha Edwards was there, too. Her husband, Darrell Edwards, 54, was killed nearly two months ago in Westmont. She hasn’t been back to work at her job as a security guard since.

“This has happened to me twice,” she said. In 2005, another father to her children was also shot and killed.

Techea Adams, whose 22-year-old son, Kejon Atkins, was killed nearly two years ago, also came from her home in Santa Clarita. Adams had moved from Willowbrook, the area where her son was killed, to escape the pervasive reminders and trauma of the killing. Since 2015, she has lost her job as a paralegal because she couldn't concentrate, she said.

At one point, Adams would drive around her old neighborhood, jotting down license plate numbers and car descriptions in an effort to find her son’s killer. Adams is still waiting for the phone call to tell her of an arrest.

“I wish this pain on no mother,” she said.

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @nicolesantacruz and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

Photo, top: Barbara Pritchett-Hughes, center, lost her second son in a shooting one year ago. She has started a new foundation and organized a peace walk for other families who have lost loved ones to violence.

Photo, above right: Techea Adams holds the photo of her 22-year-old son, Kejon Atkins, who was killed in 2015.

Credit: Irfan Khan, Los Angeles Times

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Man guilty of killing father of six near Harvard Park

DeWayne Parham Jr. didn’t know that keeping the peace could get him killed.

After a barbecue in South L.A. last year, Parham, a father of six, was shot outside his car after trying to break up an argument.

On July 14, a jury convicted Curtis Ray Weaver, 61, of first-degree murder and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Jurors also found true an allegation that Weaver discharged a firearm causing death.  The jury deliberated for about 30 minutes before reaching a verdict. 

During closing arguments July 13, Deputy Dist. Atty. Amy Murphy said Weaver “executed” 42-year-old DeWayne Parham Jr. after he tried to break up an argument. 

“He thought he was going to get away with it,” Murphy said. 

On July 31, 2016, Parham and a group of others had been hanging out for hours eating and drinking in the 6200 block of Harvard Boulevard near Harvard Park when Weaver got into an argument with another man, according to police and prosecutors. 

Parham, who had been manning the grill, tried to intervene, and ended up driving the other man home. When Parham returned to the area about 5:30 p.m., Weaver walked up and flashed his gun.

Parham repeatedly told Weaver to put the gun down, prosecutors said. 

Weaver then shot Parham once in the stomach. After Parham fell to the ground, Weaver shot him again in the back, according to court testimony. 

Weaver then got into his Dodge Nitro and drove away, blowing past stop signs, according to evidence presented in court. 

One person testified that Weaver fled “as if he did nothing wrong.” Others testified that Weaver shot Parham, who was also known as “Bug” or “Firebug.”  The next day, Weaver got a new cell phone in Pomona. 

Detectives tracked Weaver to Wilmer, Ala., and took him into custody Aug. 25. In court, prosecutors played recordings of jail calls where Weaver was trying to determine who in the neighborhood had spoken up about the shooting and asking people to discourage witnesses from going to court. 

Patrick Thomason, an alternate public defender, highlighted inconsistencies in witness testimony and questioned whether the witnesses may have had an agenda against Weaver. 

Thomason also said in closing statements that it is “human nature” to want to know who is accusing someone of murder. 

Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 11; Weaver faces 50 years to life in prison. 

As the verdict was read Friday morning, Parham’s father, DeWayne Parham Sr., began to cry. Outside the courtroom, he was embraced by family members. “God is good,” he said. “God is good.”

DeWayne Parham Jr. was the father of six children and worked with a filming company in addition to doing gang intervention work in the area. 

The victim’s sister said outside the courtroom that the verdict has brought her family closure. Lisa Parham said that in the neighborhood where she grew up, she has watched others suffer from violent loss without justice. 

“This time I can really say justice has been served,” she said.

Photo: DeWayne Parham Jr., front center, at a family gathering. Credit: Parham family

DeWayne Parham Jr. didn't know that keeping the peace could get him killed.

After a barbecue in South L.A. last year, Parham, a father of six, was shot outside his car after trying to break up an argument.

On July 14, a jury convicted Curtis Ray Weaver, 61, of first-degree murder and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Jurors also found true an allegation that Weaver discharged a firearm causing death.  The jury deliberated for about 30 minutes before reaching a verdict. 

During closing arguments July 13, Deputy Dist. Atty. Amy Murphy said Weaver “executed” 42-year-old DeWayne Parham Jr. after he tried to break up an argument. 

“He thought he was going to get away with it,” Murphy said. 

On July 31, 2016, Parham and a group of others had been hanging out for hours eating and drinking in the 6200 block of Harvard Boulevard near Harvard Park when Weaver got into an argument with another man, according to police and prosecutors. 

Parham, who had been manning the grill, tried to intervene, and ended up driving the other man home. When Parham returned to the area about 5:30 p.m., Weaver walked up and flashed his gun.

Parham repeatedly told Weaver to put the gun down, prosecutors said. 

Weaver then shot Parham once in the stomach. After Parham fell to the ground, Weaver shot him again in the back, according to court testimony. 

Weaver then got into his Dodge Nitro and drove away, blowing past stop signs, according to evidence presented in court. 

One person testified that Weaver fled “as if he did nothing wrong." Others testified that Weaver shot Parham, who was also known as "Bug" or "Firebug."  The next day, Weaver got a new cell phone in Pomona. 

Detectives tracked Weaver to Wilmer, Ala., and took him into custody Aug. 25. In court, prosecutors played recordings of jail calls where Weaver was trying to determine who in the neighborhood had spoken up about the shooting and asking people to discourage witnesses from going to court. 

Patrick Thomason, an alternate public defender, highlighted inconsistencies in witness testimony and questioned whether the witnesses may have had an agenda against Weaver. 

Thomason also said in closing statements that it is “human nature” to want to know who is accusing someone of murder. 

Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 11; Weaver faces 50 years to life in prison. 

As the verdict was read Friday morning, Parham’s father, DeWayne Parham Sr., began to cry. Outside the courtroom, he was embraced by family members. “God is good,” he said. “God is good.”

DeWayne Parham Jr. was the father of six children and worked with a filming company in addition to doing gang intervention work in the area. 

The victim's sister said outside the courtroom that the verdict has brought her family closure. Lisa Parham said that in the neighborhood where she grew up, she has watched others suffer from violent loss without justice. 

“This time I can really say justice has been served,” she said.

Photo: DeWayne Parham Jr., front center, at a family gathering. Credit: Parham family

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Pasadena man sentenced for domestic violence killing of ex-girlfriend

A Pasadena man was sentenced July 12 to 26 years to life in state prison for killing the mother of his two children, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. 

Jose Roberto Turner, 49, was found guilty June 19 of one count of first-degree murder in the death of Lajoya Kamiel McCoy, 31. The special allegation also found true that Turner used a rope to commit the crime.

On June 10, 2015, Turner strangled and stabbed McCoy, according to evidence presented at trial.

Family members reported McCoy missing June 12, 2015, after she did not show up for some appointments, according to law enforcement officials. 

McCoy’s body was found June 16 inside her vehicle, which was parked in Monrovia, prosecutors said. 

Before McCoy’s death, Turner had threatened the woman’s life over child custody issues, according to prosecutors. 

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @jeromercampbell and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

A Pasadena man was sentenced July 12 to 26 years to life in state prison for killing the mother of his two children, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. 

Jose Roberto Turner, 49, was found guilty June 19 of one count of first-degree murder in the death of Lajoya Kamiel McCoy, 31. The special allegation also found true that Turner used a rope to commit the crime.

On June 10, 2015, Turner strangled and stabbed McCoy, according to evidence presented at trial.

Family members reported McCoy missing June 12, 2015, after she did not show up for some appointments, according to law enforcement officials. 

McCoy’s body was found June 16 inside her vehicle, which was parked in Monrovia, prosecutors said. 

Before McCoy’s death, Turner had threatened the woman’s life over child custody issues, according to prosecutors. 

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @jeromercampbell and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized