The Clark Bedsole Murder-For-Hire Case

      Helen Bedsole filed for divorce, for the first time, in 1985. The working mother of two teenage children felt she had suffered enough. Clark Bedole, the owner of an electrical contracting company in Deep Creek, Virginia, had been a…

      Helen Bedsole filed for divorce, for the first time, in 1985. The working mother of two teenage children felt she had suffered enough. Clark Bedole, the owner of an electrical contracting company in Deep Creek, Virginia, had been a lousy husband. He abused Helen physically, spent a lot of money on cocaine, ran around with other women, and tried to control every aspect of his wife's life. Concerned about the financial cost of a divorce, Clark talked Helen out of it, and promised to be a better husband.

     Six years later, Helen tried once again to get out of the marriage, this time with determination, and a more aggressive attorney who demanded 50 percent of the marital estate. Infuriated by what he considered his wife's attempt to ruin him financially, Clark Bedsole hired an equally aggressive attorney. The battle had begun.

     On November 9, 1993, one week before getting her divorce, and the settlement she had fought for over the past 18 months, someone broke into Helen Bedsole's house in Geneva Shores, Virginia and shot her to death.

     Helen had been living her in Geneva Shores home just a few days when her new housemate, Gerry Jones, arrived at the dwelling with a truck load of furniture. She found the front door broken open, and Helen dead on the kitchen floor. Dead about three hours, Helen had been shot in the head, at close range, with a .380-caliber handgun. The motive hadn't been theft because the killer didn't take anything from the house.

     Detectives, once they learned of the marital discord, and the pending divorce, considered Clark Bedole their prime suspect. His gain from Helen's death, besides saving the cost of a divorce settlement, included a $132,000 life insurance benefit. Since Clark had an airtight alibi, detectives investigated the case as a contract murder, and began looking for the hitman.

     Homicide investigators caught a break in 1994 when an anonymous caller reported that during a night of sex and cocaine with Clark Bedsole, he told her that he had paid his drug supplier, DeWayne Williams, $4,000 to murder his wife. Williams, a construction worker, was already a suspect in the case. Bedole's son had seen the 21-year-old conferring with his father just before, and after, his mother's murder.

     A police informant wearing a hidden audio recorder got Williams to talk about the murder. In their conversation, Williams revealed how he had ridden a bicycle to Helen's new house in Geneva Shores. He ditched the bike in the woods, broke off the door knob, and entered the dwelling. The intruder found Helen in the kitchen where he shot her twice with a .380-caliber Colt revolver. After the murder, Williams fled the scene on foot. Later that evening, Mr Bedsole paid him $4,000 for the job.

     Detectives took DeWayne Williams into custody in November 1994 when he showed up for work at a construction site in Norfolk. The following day, the police arrested Clark Bedsole. Both men were charged with capital murder, and held in lieu of $1 million bail. Williams and Bedsole claimed they were innocent.

     In May 1995, Clark Bedsole went on trial for masterminding his wife's murder. He took the stand on his own behalf, and while admitting that he had used cocaine, and had abused his wife, denied any involvement in her death. The jury, after deliberating less than three hours, found him guilty. Two months later, the hitman, DeWayne Williams, pleaded guilty to murdering Helen Bedsole for the money.

     The judge sentenced Clark Bedsole to a prison term that included the possibility of parole after 2016. (A relatively light sentence for a murder for hire mastermind.) DeWayne Williams, on the other hand, was sentenced to death. On August 18, 1999, Williams received his lethal injection. Shortly before his passing, a reporter asked Williams if he had given much thought to the woman he had murdered in cold blood. "I thought about  how I could have gotten away with it," he said. DeWayne Williams, a true sociopath to the very end.  


from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Writers Who Seek Fame

I never cease to be amazed why some of my writer friends became famous and others, just as talented, didn’t. I’ve come to suspect it’s a matter of wanting fame or not, and those who don’t want it, don’t get it.Malcom Cowley

I never cease to be amazed why some of my writer friends became famous and others, just as talented, didn't. I've come to suspect it's a matter of wanting fame or not, and those who don't want it, don't get it.

Malcom Cowley

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Categories: Uncategorized

Constables Shoot Unarmed Man Over Parking Tickets

     Things turned ugly on July 17, 2014 when two Pennsylvania state constables attempted to serve a man with a warrant because he had accumulated 31 unpaid parking tickets. The two officers approached Kevin McCullers in the garage at his residence in a suburb of Allentown at 7:30 in the morning. McCuller’s girlfriend, Hafeezah Muhammad said McCullers was in the car about to leave for Dunkin’ Donuts.

     The constables positioned themselves on both sides of McCullers’ car. One of them told him to turn off the car, and he did. There was a short conversation. Then, according to Lehigh County district attorney James Martin, one of the constables opened the driver’s side door of the vehicle.

     McCullers responded by restarting the car. He began backing out of his garage with the car door ajar. That’s when the constables drew their guns and fired. One constable shot the 38-year-old in the back. The other officer shot out the vehicle’s left front tire.

     One of the constables told the district attorney he and his partner pulled their guns and fired because they felt threatened while standing in the garage as McCullers tried to back out. McCullers was unarmed.

     McCullers’ girlfriend said the constables could have walked up to the front door of their house to serve the warrant. “They never knocked on the door! No nothing,” she told a local TV reporter. “I just heard the gunshots. He pulled the car out of the garage and all I heard were gunshots.”…

     Muhammad said McCullers may never walk again. “For parking tickets,” she said. “It’s insane.”

     The district attorney expressed concern about the fact a constable–an elected state official–shot a man and possibly left him paralyzed over unpaid parking tickets…The prosecutor said the office of constable–a Pennsylvania oddity–is troubling because people who hold the job are poorly prepared and largely unaccountable. “Although they receive training, they really operate under no one’s direct supervision,” he said. The district attorney said the shooting would have been avoided had McCullers entered into a payment plan to pay the money he owed.

     [For years law enforcement leaders and lawmakers in Pennsylvania have tried to abolish the position of constable. This is not the first incident of excessive force on the part of one of these officers. And it won’t be the last.] 

     Things turned ugly on July 17, 2014 when two Pennsylvania state constables attempted to serve a man with a warrant because he had accumulated 31 unpaid parking tickets. The two officers approached Kevin McCullers in the garage at his residence in a suburb of Allentown at 7:30 in the morning. McCuller's girlfriend, Hafeezah Muhammad said McCullers was in the car about to leave for Dunkin' Donuts.

     The constables positioned themselves on both sides of McCullers' car. One of them told him to turn off the car, and he did. There was a short conversation. Then, according to Lehigh County district attorney James Martin, one of the constables opened the driver's side door of the vehicle.

     McCullers responded by restarting the car. He began backing out of his garage with the car door ajar. That's when the constables drew their guns and fired. One constable shot the 38-year-old in the back. The other officer shot out the vehicle's left front tire.

     One of the constables told the district attorney he and his partner pulled their guns and fired because they felt threatened while standing in the garage as McCullers tried to back out. McCullers was unarmed.

     McCullers' girlfriend said the constables could have walked up to the front door of their house to serve the warrant. "They never knocked on the door! No nothing," she told a local TV reporter. "I just heard the gunshots. He pulled the car out of the garage and all I heard were gunshots."…

     Muhammad said McCullers may never walk again. "For parking tickets," she said. "It's insane."

     The district attorney expressed concern about the fact a constable--an elected state official--shot a man and possibly left him paralyzed over unpaid parking tickets…The prosecutor said the office of constable--a Pennsylvania oddity--is troubling because people who hold the job are poorly prepared and largely unaccountable. "Although they receive training, they really operate under no one's direct supervision," he said. The district attorney said the shooting would have been avoided had McCullers entered into a payment plan to pay the money he owed.

     [For years law enforcement leaders and lawmakers in Pennsylvania have tried to abolish the position of constable. This is not the first incident of excessive force on the part of one of these officers. And it won't be the last.] 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Kwanda Carpenter Student Sex Case

     On January 11, 2013, a married, 33-year-old Bessemer City, North Carolina high school bus driver contacted school authorities with an unusual complaint. Kwanda Carpenter reported that a pair of high school boys who claimed to have h…

     On January 11, 2013, a married, 33-year-old Bessemer City, North Carolina high school bus driver contacted school authorities with an unusual complaint. Kwanda Carpenter reported that a pair of high school boys who claimed to have had sex with her were trying to blackmail her for $60.

     According to Facebook messages sent to the bus driver by Malik Ty Mel Moore and Donja Phillips, the high school students threatened to "call the police and report that she had raped them" if she didn't cough-up the sixty bucks.

     Moore and Phillips, when questioned by detectives with the Gaston County Sheriff's Office, accused Carpenter of picking them up in her car at ten o'clock on the night of October 3, 2012. According to the boys, Carpenter drove them to a secluded spot on a dead-end street where she had "sexual contact" with them in the vehicle. After that, she drove the boys home.

     Following Carpenter's complaint to school officials, they suspended her with pay. (She made $12.91 an hour.)

     On January 16,  five days after she reported the extortion to the school, police arrested Carpenter at her home on two counts of sexual activity with a student by school personnel other than a teacher. The magistrate set the bus driver's bail at $5,000.

     Malik Ty Mel Moore and Donja Phillips were charged with blackmail. (These boys were lucky that stupidity wasn't a criminal offense. If it were, blackmailing somebody on Facebook would be stupid in the first-degree.) These charges were later dropped.

     Kwanda Carpenter, when questioned by detectives, denied having had sexual contact with the students.

     On March 7, 2013, Carpenter was indicted on two counts of sexual activity with a student. Five months later, she pleaded guilty to the lesser charges of attempted crimes against nature in return for a suspended sentence.

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Multiple Personality Hoax

     In 1973, the memoir, “Sybil” told the story of Sybil Dorsett (real identify Shirley Mason) who claimed to have had sixteen separate personalities as a result of childhood abuse. The best-selling book (7 million copies) created …

     In 1973, the memoir, "Sybil" told the story of Sybil Dorsett (real identify Shirley Mason) who claimed to have had sixteen separate personalities as a result of childhood abuse. The best-selling book (7 million copies) created the multiple personality disorder and planted the notion of the repressed memory syndrome into the American consciousness.

     According to a book by Debbie Nathan called "Sybil Exposed: The Extraordinary Story Behind the Famous Multiple Personality Case," the 1973 memoir was a phony book contrived by Munson, her therapist, and a journalist. In a 1958 letter uncovered by Nathan, Mason confessed that she didn't have multiple personalities. Shirley Mason died of breast cancer in 1998. (In the years that followed the publication of the 1973 memoir, several defendants in serial murder cases, pursuant to insanity defenses, claimed--unsuccessfully--multiple personality disorders.)

     Mason's memoir led 40,000 readers to claim they had repressed memories of childhood abuse, an unknown syndrome prior to 1973. Several of these claims led to the sexual abuse convictions of innocent people. In 1976 and 2007 two movies based on Mason's memoir were produced. One of them starred Sally Fields. 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Celebrity Journalist

Journalists are now celebrities. Part of this has been caused by the ability and willingness of journalists to promote themselves. Part of this has been caused by television, the television reporter is often more famous than anyone he interviews.Nora E…

Journalists are now celebrities. Part of this has been caused by the ability and willingness of journalists to promote themselves. Part of this has been caused by television, the television reporter is often more famous than anyone he interviews.

Nora Ephron

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

Categories: Uncategorized

Carl Ericsson: The Mad-at-the-World Homicidal Loser

     Norman Johnson and Carl Ericsson attended the same high school at the same time in Madison, South Dakota, a farm town of 6,500. That’s all they had in common. Johnson, a member of the class of 1958, had been a popular football star …

     Norman Johnson and Carl Ericsson attended the same high school at the same time in Madison, South Dakota, a farm town of 6,500. That's all they had in common. Johnson, a member of the class of 1958, had been a popular football star while Ericsson, in the class ahead of him, was a loner, and the team's water boy. As high school students, and as adults, these men lived vastly contrasting lives. Norman Johnson married his high school girlfriend and became a pillar of the local community, while Ericsson moved away, married, and lived in comparative obscurity.

     After college, Norman Johnson returned to Madison where, for the next 35-years, he taught high school English and coached the football team. In retirement, he stayed active in the community as a playground supervisor, proofreader for the hometown newspaper, and as a part time employee at the local hardware store. He was still married to his high school girlfriend, had two grown daughters, and lived in a modest two-story house in town. He was surrounded by former students who still called him Mr. Johnson.

     After high school, Carl Ericsson moved to Wyoming where he found a low-level job with the federal government. After retirement, he moved to Watertown, South Dakota 50 miles north of Madison. As an alcoholic who was chronically depressed, Ericsson was a surely, difficult man who loved his dog more than people. He lived in a tiny, one-story house with his long-suffering wife. As is the custom with profoundly unhappy maladjusted people, Ericsson did not get along with his father, a successful attorney in Madison, or his younger brother Dick who had followed their father into the law. He also complained and harassed the children in his neighborhood, gave people who irritated him the finger, and once even threatened to kill his younger brother. He was the type of person psychologists, psychiatrists, and medication can't fix. People avoided this guy like the plague.

     On the evening of January 31, 2011, Ericsson was seen in Madison prowling around backyards, knocking on residents' doors, and shinning his flashlight into homes. As further evidence he was up to no good, Ericsson was in possession of a Glock 45-caliber pistol with a 17-round clip, one of many handguns he owned.

     At 7:30 that evening, Ericsson pulled his brown Ford Taurus up to Norman Johnson's house,  walked up the sidewalk, and knocked on his front door. When Johnson appeared at the entrance, he did not recognize the man standing on his stoop with the shock of white hair and full beard. The men hadn't seen each other since high school. "Are you Norman Johnson?" Ericsson asked. Immediately after Johnson answered yes, the former water boy shot the retired teacher in the face--twice--leaving him to die in the doorway of his home.

     The next day, officers with the Madison Police Department took Carl Ericsson into custody. When a detective asked him why he had murdered a man he hadn't seen for 53 years, Ericsson said he had gotten even for a locker room prank Johnson and other students had played on him back in 1957. According to Ericsson, the football players had forced him to wear a jock-strap on his head, a high school humiliation he had brooded over for decades. He had fantasized about getting revenge, and that's what he did.

     Investigators, of course, had no way of knowing if this prank ever took place, or if it had, if Norman Johnson had anything to do with it. As a matter of law, and criminal homicide, all of that was irrelevant anyway. But some in the sob sister media, when covering this murder, focused on the bullying aspect of the story, suggesting that being forced to don a jock-strap can turn a person into a depressed, alcoholic, mad-at-the-world loser who will someday erupt into a cold-blooded killer.

     Carl Ericsson pleaded guilty to a South Dakota homicide offense called second-degree murder under circumstances of mental illness. (In many states this is called guilty but mentally ill.) This meant that Ericsson would receive mental health treatment at a state prison rather than in an institution for the criminally insane. Because he knew exactly what he was doing, this defendant was not criminally insane. He was a guy with a drinking problem and a lousy personality who couldn't cope with life. The woods are full of people just like him. Fortunately they are not all murderers.

     On June 16, 2012, a judge sentenced Ericsson to life without parole.              

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Illness Autobiography

Dealing with adversity is in some ways the theme of all narrative autobiography, but there is a particularly rich tradition about struggles with a particular medical or physical malady, such as blindness, cancer, or paralysis. Originally, this type nea…

Dealing with adversity is in some ways the theme of all narrative autobiography, but there is a particularly rich tradition about struggles with a particular medical or physical malady, such as blindness, cancer, or paralysis. Originally, this type nearly always took the form of the Inspirational, a struggle against the odds in which the courage of the subject brings a triumph, at least of spirit, in the end. More recently, a new Literature of Adversity has evolved, which does not depend upon the "final triumph" but which derives its values from the depth and frankness of its discussion.

Tristine Rainer, Your Life as Story, 1998 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Nadia Malik Suspicious Death Case

     In February 2014, 22-year-old Nadia Malik resided with her one-year-old daughter and her parents in Broomall, Pennsylvania, a Delaware County suburb in the Philadelphia area. The one-year-old’s father, Nadia’s estranged boyfriend, 2…

     In February 2014, 22-year-old Nadia Malik resided with her one-year-old daughter and her parents in Broomall, Pennsylvania, a Delaware County suburb in the Philadelphia area. The one-year-old's father, Nadia's estranged boyfriend, 25-year-old Bhupinder Singh, lived with their four-year-old daughter at his parents' apartment in Solon, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. In 2012, the couple had an infant that, according to court documents, died suddenly under "suspect circumstances."

     Nadia and Bhupinder reportedly had a relationship described as "strained, on/off, and violent." Nadia had recently been fired from her job as a CVS pharmacy assistant in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania for missing too much work. 
     On February 9 and again on February 10, 2014, Nadia Malik sent text messages to her brother Faud Malik and her friend Thomas Singh (no relation to Bhupinder) informing them that Bhupinder was holding her against her will in a car. On February 9, Thomas Singh reported Nadia missing to the Lansdowne, Pennsylvania Police Department. (Shortly thereafter the case was transferred to the Marple Township police.) 
     On February 12, 2014, investigators traced Bhupinder Singh, through Nadia's cellphone, to his parents' apartment in Solon, Ohio. At the arrival of the police that day, Singh tried to escape out the back door but was arrested before he ran very far. Officers took him into the Cuyahoga County Corrections Center on a probation violation warrant issued out of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. 
     Singh, who claimed to have no knowledge regarding Nadia's whereabouts, had scratches on his face and a black eye. He told his interrogators the injuries were sustained in a fight he had with Nadia. The last time he saw her was on February 11, 2014 in Delaware County. He left her in his father's black 2007 Nissan Altima and took a bus to his parents' home in Solon. When arrested, Singh possessed Nadia's cellphone and her driver's license.  
     At ten-thirty on the morning of Thursday, February 20, 2014, an anonymous tipster called the Marple Township Police Department regarding a black 2007 Nissan Altima with heavily tinted windows parked on 30th Street near Market Street in Philadelphia. Police officers found eight parking tickets on the vehicle. 
     In the reclined front passenger seat of the Nissan, officers found Nadia Malik positioned on her side as though she had been sleeping. The dead woman was fully clothed with a duffel bag resting on top of her head. The car also contained a pile of clothing, loose change, and prescription bill bottles issued to Bhupinder Singh.
     The first parking ticket on the car had been issued on February 10, a few blocks away at 23rd and Market Streets. The second citation was issued on February 12 when the Nissan was parked in an emergency zone on Market Street. The first ticket placed on the car where it was found on February 20 had been issued two days earlier. 
     Based on the parking ticket history, Nadia Malik either died between February 18 and February 20, several days after Bhupinder Singh's arrest. If she had died before that, someone had moved the Nissan with her dead body in it.
     A Philadelphia forensic pathologist performed the autopsy on Friday, February 21, 2014. A spokesperson for the medical examiner's office announced there were no signs of physical trauma on Malik's body. The spokesperson did not reveal the time of death in the case, a vital piece of information, or the cause and manner of death.

     On October 16, 2014, a spokesperson for the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office announced that toxicological tests on Malik's body had not solved the mystery of what killed her or how she  had died.

     In February 2015, a year after Malik's suspicious death, the authorities released information regarding the February 28, 2012 death of Malik's 3-month-old daughter, Alina Singh. Paramedics had found the child next to her mother in a car parked near a Chinese restaurant in the Delaware County town of Springfield. The unresponsive infant was pronounced dead later that day. The Delaware County Medical Examiner ruled the cause of Alina's death as cachexia--a type of muscle atrophy commonly called "wasting syndrome." The manner of the child's death remained "undetermined."

     Detectives with the Philadelphia Police Department continued to investigate Nadia Malik's death as a possible murder case. When questioned by the police in Ohio, Bhupinder Singh said he had fled to Ohio on a Greyhound bus out of New York City after arguing with Malik on matters "concerning their relationship."

     After being found guilty in April 2014 of violating his probation, Singh spent a month in jail. Upon his release on parole, he took up residence in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. According to a police spokesperson in February 2015, detectives still considered Bhupinder Singh a suspect in what they believed was Malik's homicidal death.

     In July 2015, Nadia's brother, 32-year-old Khaled Malik, offered a $50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for his sister's death. As of November 2018, no arrests have been made in this mysterious case. 

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/

The Thomas Gilbert High Society Murder Case

     Thirty-year-old Thomas Gilbert Jr. cut the figure of rich kid Dickie Greenleaf in the novel and film of the same name, The Talented Mr. Ripley. In the book and movie the slacker playboy was murdered by a friend who took up his ident…

     Thirty-year-old Thomas Gilbert Jr. cut the figure of rich kid Dickie Greenleaf in the novel and film of the same name, The Talented Mr. Ripley. In the book and movie the slacker playboy was murdered by a friend who took up his identify. In real life, however, when someone in a wealthy family is murdered, it's usually the man or woman who created the wealth, not an offspring who depended on it.

     In 2015, 70-year-old Thomas Gilbert Sr. resided with his wife in an apartment building on the east side of Manhattan just north of the United Nations headquarters. Besides their two sons, the couple had a 24-year-old daughter who aspired to be a writer.

     A graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Business School, Mr. Gilbert, in 2011, started a hedge fund called Wainscott Partners Fund, a firm that specialized in the biotech and healthcare industries. Three years after its inception, the fund handled $200 million in assets. Only people with $500,000 or more to invest were invited to participate in the fund.

     Mr. Gilbert worked hard to get his relatively small investment firm off the ground. A friendly man who enjoyed the upper-crust social life, Mr. Gilbert belonged to exclusive organizations such as the Maidstone Club in East Hampton and the River Club in Manhattan.

     Mr. Gilbert's youngest son, Thomas Jr., grew up benefiting from his father's wealth, hard work, and success. His parents enrolled him in elite boarding schools--the Buckley School ($30,000 a year tuition) and Deerfield Prep ($54,000 annual tuition)--where the six-foot-three student with the thick blond hair excelled at sports. Following boarding school, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert's quiet, reserved and socially awkward youngest son attended Princeton University. In 2009 Thomas Jr. graduated from the Ivy League school with a degree in economics.

     Notwithstanding his prestigious education, high social status, and all the advantages a young man could ask for, Thomas Jr. didn't enter the world of finance or any other business or profession. He wanted to start his own hedge fund but his father didn't think he had the ability or the drive to succeed in the field. As a result, Thomas assumed the role of a playboy reliant on his father's generosity. It didn't sit well with him.

     To maintain his high society lifestyle, Thomas needed more money than his father was willing to shell out. He existed on a $2,400 a month housing stipend and a $600 a week spending allowance. This was not nearly enough to support his expensive apartment in Chelsea, his gym fees, the party-going circuit, and his love of surfing. Deeply in debt, Thomas wanted a much larger allowance to continue living in the style he had become accustomed to.

     But there was a problem. Thomas and his father didn't get along. His father thought he was lazy and stupid and junior considered his father stingy and mean. Moreover, in September 2014, the family's 17th century mansion on eastern Long Island's East Hampton community burned down. Thomas Jr., an obsessive-compulsive sufferer who didn't always stay on his medication, surfaced quickly as the prime suspect in the arson. (No charges have been filed in the case.) That fire did not endear Mr. Gilbert to his son.

     A little after three in the afternoon on Sunday January 5, 2015, Thomas Jr. showed up at his parents' apartment to discuss his allowance with his father. Thomas Sr. had informed his son that he had decided to cut his weekly spending budget from $600 to $400.

     Upon his arrival at the apartment, the younger Mr. Gilbert sent his mother out of the building to buy him a sandwich. Shortly after she left the premises, the son, while confronting his father in the master bedroom, shot him once in the head with a handgun. In an inept attempt to make the shooting look like a suicide, Thomas laid the murder weapon on his father's chest and positioned the dead man's left hand over it.

     After the shooting, Thomas fled the apartment. When his mother returned with the sandwich, she discovered her husband's corpse and called 911.

     At ten-forty-five on the night of Mr. Gilbert's sudden and violent death, New York City detectives showed up at his son's apartment with an arrest and a search warrant. In the Chelsea dwelling officers found loose bullets and a shell casing that matched the caliber of the murder weapon.

     On Monday January 6, 2015, at his arraignment, the judge informed Thomas Gilbert Jr. that he had been charged with second-degree murder and criminal possession of a weapon. After the judge denied the suspect bail, officers returned him to Riker's Island, the city's massive jail.

    On February 5, 2014, corrections officers took Gilbert Jr. out of his Rikers Island jail cell and escorted him to a Lower Manhattan courtroom. At the pre-trial hearing before Judge Melissa Jackson, the suspect pleaded not guilty. The defendant was represented by attorneys from the high-profile defense firm of Brafman & Associates.

     According to his attorneys, Thomas Gilbert Jr. had a long history of violent and erratic behavior. On the ground their client was insane, the defense petitioned the court to render Gilbert mentally unfit to stand trial. At the same time, the defense lawyers asserted that their client was innocent of the crime.

     As of November 2018, Thomas Gilbert Jr. has not been brought to trial.

from http://jimfishertruecrime.blogspot.com/