New Resources on Law Enforcement’s Role in Victim Compensation

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for … Continue reading

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for law enforcement agencies to use to enhance law enforcement’s role in providing necessary information around crime victim compensation to crime victims.

A first responder is not expected to know the ways that trauma or crime will impact a victim—but he or she can help by being a source of information and a resource for crime victim compensation. Newly published IACP resources give law enforcement the tools to help victims each step of the way, from speaking to a victim and leaving them with important information, to tips for writing reports to include key victim compensation information, to general promotion of the state’s crime victim compensation program. Some of these resources can be personalized for an agency and can be printed and carried by officers to easily pass information to the victim.

Since the first individuals on the scene of a crime are traditionally first responders and law enforcement, they are the first to show compassion and offer help. Share these materials to broaden understanding of crime victim compensation and the role of law enforcement in helping victims apply for and receive it after victimization.

Visit the IACP website to access these materials, including:

  • Training videos for first responders, investigators, and law enforcement leadership with companion guides
  • A list of frequently asked questions about victim compensation
  • A palmcard with information on victim compensation that can be customized to your jurisdiction
  • A tip card on important elements of writing a report that can help a victim be approved for compensation
  • And more resources.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized

New Resources on Law Enforcement’s Role in Victim Compensation

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for … Continue reading

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for law enforcement agencies to use to enhance law enforcement’s role in providing necessary information around crime victim compensation to crime victims.

A first responder is not expected to know the ways that trauma or crime will impact a victim—but he or she can help by being a source of information and a resource for crime victim compensation. Newly published IACP resources give law enforcement the tools to help victims each step of the way, from speaking to a victim and leaving them with important information, to tips for writing reports to include key victim compensation information, to general promotion of the state’s crime victim compensation program. Some of these resources can be personalized for an agency and can be printed and carried by officers to easily pass information to the victim.

Since the first individuals on the scene of a crime are traditionally first responders and law enforcement, they are the first to show compassion and offer help. Share these materials to broaden understanding of crime victim compensation and the role of law enforcement in helping victims apply for and receive it after victimization.

Visit the IACP website to access these materials, including:

  • Training videos for first responders, investigators, and law enforcement leadership with companion guides
  • A list of frequently asked questions about victim compensation
  • A palmcard with information on victim compensation that can be customized to your jurisdiction
  • A tip card on important elements of writing a report that can help a victim be approved for compensation
  • And more resources.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized

New Resources on Law Enforcement’s Role in Victim Compensation

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for … Continue reading

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for law enforcement agencies to use to enhance law enforcement’s role in providing necessary information around crime victim compensation to crime victims.

A first responder is not expected to know the ways that trauma or crime will impact a victim—but he or she can help by being a source of information and a resource for crime victim compensation. Newly published IACP resources give law enforcement the tools to help victims each step of the way, from speaking to a victim and leaving them with important information, to tips for writing reports to include key victim compensation information, to general promotion of the state’s crime victim compensation program. Some of these resources can be personalized for an agency and can be printed and carried by officers to easily pass information to the victim.

Since the first individuals on the scene of a crime are traditionally first responders and law enforcement, they are the first to show compassion and offer help. Share these materials to broaden understanding of crime victim compensation and the role of law enforcement in helping victims apply for and receive it after victimization.

Visit the IACP website to access these materials, including:

  • Training videos for first responders, investigators, and law enforcement leadership with companion guides
  • A list of frequently asked questions about victim compensation
  • A palmcard with information on victim compensation that can be customized to your jurisdiction
  • A tip card on important elements of writing a report that can help a victim be approved for compensation
  • And more resources.
Categories: Uncategorized

New Resources on Law Enforcement’s Role in Victim Compensation

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for … Continue reading

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for law enforcement agencies to use to enhance law enforcement’s role in providing necessary information around crime victim compensation to crime victims.

A first responder is not expected to know the ways that trauma or crime will impact a victim—but he or she can help by being a source of information and a resource for crime victim compensation. Newly published IACP resources give law enforcement the tools to help victims each step of the way, from speaking to a victim and leaving them with important information, to tips for writing reports to include key victim compensation information, to general promotion of the state’s crime victim compensation program. Some of these resources can be personalized for an agency and can be printed and carried by officers to easily pass information to the victim.

Since the first individuals on the scene of a crime are traditionally first responders and law enforcement, they are the first to show compassion and offer help. Share these materials to broaden understanding of crime victim compensation and the role of law enforcement in helping victims apply for and receive it after victimization.

Visit the IACP website to access these materials, including:

  • Training videos for first responders, investigators, and law enforcement leadership with companion guides
  • A list of frequently asked questions about victim compensation
  • A palmcard with information on victim compensation that can be customized to your jurisdiction
  • A tip card on important elements of writing a report that can help a victim be approved for compensation
  • And more resources.
Categories: Uncategorized

New Resources on Law Enforcement’s Role in Victim Compensation

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for … Continue reading

The IACP, in partnership with the Police Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime, is proud to present resources around “Law Enforcement’s Role in Supporting Crime Victims’ Access to Compensation.” These resources provide a variety of materials for law enforcement agencies to use to enhance law enforcement’s role in providing necessary information around crime victim compensation to crime victims.

A first responder is not expected to know the ways that trauma or crime will impact a victim—but he or she can help by being a source of information and a resource for crime victim compensation. Newly published IACP resources give law enforcement the tools to help victims each step of the way, from speaking to a victim and leaving them with important information, to tips for writing reports to include key victim compensation information, to general promotion of the state’s crime victim compensation program. Some of these resources can be personalized for an agency and can be printed and carried by officers to easily pass information to the victim.

Since the first individuals on the scene of a crime are traditionally first responders and law enforcement, they are the first to show compassion and offer help. Share these materials to broaden understanding of crime victim compensation and the role of law enforcement in helping victims apply for and receive it after victimization.

Visit the IACP website to access these materials, including:

  • Training videos for first responders, investigators, and law enforcement leadership with companion guides
  • A list of frequently asked questions about victim compensation
  • A palmcard with information on victim compensation that can be customized to your jurisdiction
  • A tip card on important elements of writing a report that can help a victim be approved for compensation
  • And more resources.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized

Shared Voices for Community Safety

Summer break has drawn to a close in Wisconsin, and as students head back to the classroom, concerns about school safety may arise. Last month, Wausau, Wisconsin, Police Department (WPD) took steps to pre-emptively address these concerns. Through a request … Continue reading

Summer break has drawn to a close in Wisconsin, and as students head back to the classroom, concerns about school safety may arise. Last month, Wausau, Wisconsin, Police Department (WPD) took steps to pre-emptively address these concerns. Through a request to the Collaborative Reform Initiative – Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), WPD participated in a School and Workplace Violence Seminar. This course from the National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) provided a forum for staff from local police departments, sheriff’s offices, school districts, social services, and health care organizations to come together to prepare their community to appropriately assess and manage threats and respond to violence as well as to build relationships among organizations and agencies.

wausau1

Over the course of the two-day seminar, everyone had an opportunity to ask questions, pose solutions, and learn more about how to prevent and respond to school and workplace violence. Through discussions, table top exercises, and other activities, participants learned about warning signs, layers of response, resource allocation, and processes. As one of the local high school associate principals explained, “The material forced us to examine every phase of threat assessment…moving all the way to emergency planning.” They learned to apply lessons garnered from high-profile events from around the world, and gained unique insight by debriefing on past local incidents.

“Our group of stakeholders agreed on the need to address emergency planning and threat assessment procedures in a collaborative manner, for the benefit of the larger shared community we all serve together,” said Wausau Police Lieutenant Nathan Cihlar. “The training provided by CRI-TAC was an excellent means of bringing the necessary players together with a training experience that has provided the foundation for building our community Threat Assessment Team initiative.”

wausau2

Is school safety a priority for your community? Do you believe your agency would benefit from this training, or a similar one? If you are interested in learning more about this or other services and resources available through the CRI-TAC visit the program webpage or email CRITAC@theIACP.org.

 

This project was supported, in whole or in part, by cooperative agreement number 2017-CR-WX-K001 awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services. The opinions contained herein are those of the author(s) or contributor(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. References to specific individuals, agencies, companies, products, or services should not be considered an endorsement by the author(s) or the U.S. Department of Justice. Rather, the references are illustrations to supplement discussion of the issues.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized

The Benefits of IACP 2018

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President.  With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President. 

With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from attending, but this year I’m really considering why, as a chief, I take several people from my organization with me.  I mean, this is a “chief’s” conference, right?  So why am I bringing lieutenants, a captain, and a professional staff person along with me?

  • Individual learning: First, you can’t beat the education tracks offered at the IACP conference.  There is so much to attend, you almost have to bring people so you can divide and conquer!  We usually get together ahead of time with the workshop agenda and decide who will attend what, then debrief to each other and our organizations when conference is over.  It’s a great way to get the most information possible across the wide variety of workshops offered.
  • Best practices and emerging trends: The IACP conference is the one place to hear about best practices from agencies around the globe, while also offering insight into emerging trends and technology sure to impact the future of our profession.
  • Exhibit Hall: It’s a one-stop-location for equipment, technology, gadgets, vehicles, latest crime prevention tools, communication devices, and so much more!  My department is looking at potentially making some technological changes over the next year, and we have been waiting for conference because we know all the companies we need will be brought to us in one location!
  • Networking: I don’t have to tell any of you about the great networking opportunities available through conference attendance.  It’s a chance to meet new professionals worldwide, connect with friends from different professional development programs, and see colleagues from so many other classes and courses we attend throughout our careers.  But by bringing people from our organizations, it’s also a great chance for us to expose our next generations to our personal networks that we have built up over the years.  Which leads me to my last point…
  • Succession planning: As executives, one of our highest priorities is to build our benches, mentor, succession plan, and get the generation behind us (and the generation behind them!) ready to take the reins.  When I bring co-workers with me to conference, I am able to spend several days steeping them in the current trends of the profession while allowing them to push their own boundaries and explore the future of our profession that they will create together.  And in that piece alone, we, as chiefs, fulfill the mission of the IACP:

Serving the Leaders of Today…DEVELOPING the Leaders of Tomorrow

The IACP Annual Conference will be held October 6-9, 2018 in Orlando, Florida.

 

Categories: Uncategorized

The Importance of IACP 2018

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President.  With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President. 

With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from attending, but this year I’m really considering why, as a chief, I take several people from my organization with me.  I mean, this is a “chief’s” conference, right?  So why am I bringing lieutenants, a captain, and a professional staff person along with me?

  • Individual learning: First, you can’t beat the education tracks offered at the IACP conference.  There is so much to attend, you almost have to bring people so you can divide and conquer!  We usually get together ahead of time with the workshop agenda and decide who will attend what, then debrief to each other and our organizations when conference is over.  It’s a great way to get the most information possible across the wide variety of workshops offered.
  • Best practices and emerging trends: The IACP conference is the one place to hear about best practices from agencies around the globe, while also offering insight into emerging trends and technology sure to impact the future of our profession.
  • Exhibit Hall: It’s a one-stop-location for equipment, technology, gadgets, vehicles, latest crime prevention tools, communication devices, and so much more!  My department is looking at potentially making some technological changes over the next year, and we have been waiting for conference because we know all the companies we need will be brought to us in one location!
  • Networking: I don’t have to tell any of you about the great networking opportunities available through conference attendance.  It’s a chance to meet new professionals worldwide, connect with friends from different professional development programs, and see colleagues from so many other classes and courses we attend throughout our careers.  But by bringing people from our organizations, it’s also a great chance for us to expose our next generations to our personal networks that we have built up over the years.  Which leads me to my last point…
  • Succession planning: As executives, one of our highest priorities is to build our benches, mentor, succession plan, and get the generation behind us (and the generation behind them!) ready to take the reins.  When I bring co-workers with me to conference, I am able to spend several days steeping them in the current trends of the profession while allowing them to push their own boundaries and explore the future of our profession that they will create together.  And in that piece alone, we, as chiefs, fulfill the mission of the IACP:

Serving the Leaders of Today…DEVELOPING the Leaders of Tomorrow

The IACP Annual Conference will be held October 6-9, 2018 in Orlando, Florida.

 

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized

The Benefits of IACP 2018

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President.  With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from … Continue reading

Guest Blogger: Cynthia Renaud, Chief, Santa Monica, California, Police Department and IACP 3rd Vice President. 

With about 10 years of IACP conferences under my belt now, I certainly have my own thoughts about what I’ve received personally and professionally from attending, but this year I’m really considering why, as a chief, I take several people from my organization with me.  I mean, this is a “chief’s” conference, right?  So why am I bringing lieutenants, a captain, and a professional staff person along with me?

  • Individual learning: First, you can’t beat the education tracks offered at the IACP conference.  There is so much to attend, you almost have to bring people so you can divide and conquer!  We usually get together ahead of time with the workshop agenda and decide who will attend what, then debrief to each other and our organizations when conference is over.  It’s a great way to get the most information possible across the wide variety of workshops offered.
  • Best practices and emerging trends: The IACP conference is the one place to hear about best practices from agencies around the globe, while also offering insight into emerging trends and technology sure to impact the future of our profession.
  • Exhibit Hall: It’s a one-stop-location for equipment, technology, gadgets, vehicles, latest crime prevention tools, communication devices, and so much more!  My department is looking at potentially making some technological changes over the next year, and we have been waiting for conference because we know all the companies we need will be brought to us in one location!
  • Networking: I don’t have to tell any of you about the great networking opportunities available through conference attendance.  It’s a chance to meet new professionals worldwide, connect with friends from different professional development programs, and see colleagues from so many other classes and courses we attend throughout our careers.  But by bringing people from our organizations, it’s also a great chance for us to expose our next generations to our personal networks that we have built up over the years.  Which leads me to my last point…
  • Succession planning: As executives, one of our highest priorities is to build our benches, mentor, succession plan, and get the generation behind us (and the generation behind them!) ready to take the reins.  When I bring co-workers with me to conference, I am able to spend several days steeping them in the current trends of the profession while allowing them to push their own boundaries and explore the future of our profession that they will create together.  And in that piece alone, we, as chiefs, fulfill the mission of the IACP:

Serving the Leaders of Today…DEVELOPING the Leaders of Tomorrow

The IACP Annual Conference will be held October 6-9, 2018 in Orlando, Florida.

 

Categories: Uncategorized

The Law Enforcement Marriage: Knowing When It’s Time to Get Help

Healthy marriages and relationships have the potential to provide law enforcement officers a great degree of support. Officers tend to work long non-traditional hours and encounter many on the job stressors that some traditional jobs might not. Healthy marriages can … Continue reading

Healthy marriages and relationships have the potential to provide law enforcement officers a great degree of support. Officers tend to work long non-traditional hours and encounter many on the job stressors that some traditional jobs might not. Healthy marriages can contribute to minimizing stressors and distractions that may affect judgement and focus in both partners. Recent research has also shown that couples in healthy marriages are more likely to have improved immune systems and therefore have reduced rates of illnesses and are often more health-conscious. These couples may actually live longer than those in unhealthy or unhappy marriages.[1]

There are some factors of having a spouse working in law enforcement that might impact the harmony of a marriage. An officer’s non-traditional work hours or on-call duty can interfere with family life. Some officers can develop cumulative PTSD or other mental health conditions that can make building and nurturing interpersonal relationships difficult.  In many instances, couples are not prepared for, or educated on the psychological impact that the job could have.

It is critical for the couple to recognize when it is time to seek help and receive care. Frequent self- and partner inventories of the marriage can be helpful to resolve issues before they become large scale stressors. Below are some common signals couples should take note of and consider seeking professional help if they feel any of the below applies.

  1. If either spouse begins to prioritize a job above the marital relationship, miscommunications could arise.
  2. The officer starts having fewer non-law enforcement friends causing the non-law enforcement spouse to feel isolated as civilian friendships dissipate over time.
  3. Conflict, arguments, or disputes in the marriage are resolved less often and leave one or both spouses emotionally hurt. When conflict resolution skills no longer work like they did, the impact of the job can be a major cause.
  4. The officer feels his/her spouse doesn’t understand the officer or the job requirements. This often occurs because neither spouse acquired reliable and honest information on what the job entails and the challenges associated with a law enforcement career.  Because of this, both spouses are unable to identify the reason for the misunderstanding.
  5. One or both spouses begin to see more negatives than positives in the marriage. This applies to any marriage, but it is significantly important in the law enforcement marriage because officers may become more cynical the longer they are in the profession.

Officers and their spouse should heed these signs and seek confidential help to refocus  the marriage that can lead to healthier, safer, more balanced lives.

Having a healthy support system for both partners is an important aspect to a successful and fulfilling marriage and law enforcement career. Support systems aren’t created or broken overnight, through thoughtful, conscious, honest, and sometimes guided conversations, law enforcement marriages and families can build a solid foundation to support the relationship and each other throughout a person’s career.

Assistant Chief Oldham will be speaking at the 2018 IACP Annual Conference during the No More Victims: Critical Care of the ‘Flat Line’ Law Enforcement Marriage on Sunday, October 7, 2018, 8:00am-9:30am at the Orange County Convention Center West Building, room W305. This workshop is part of the Companion track and will discuss issues and tools to promote strong law enforcement marriages; additional family wellness resources will be available during this workshop.

For more information on Law Enforcement Family Resources:

[1]   John Gottman.  The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work. (New York, NY:  Harmony Books, 2015)

from https://theiacpblog.org

Categories: Uncategorized