New IACA Class Posted: Webinar: A Face in the Crowd – Finding Your Suspect Using Searchable Photo Databases Without the Aid of Facial Recognition software: 2/28/2019 – 2/28/2019 in Online

As analysts and investigators, we see a lot of faces. Whether it’s from looking at booking photos, scanning surveillance video, or scouring a suspect’s social media account, we are constantly searching for faces. In many respects, faces are our busines…

As analysts and investigators, we see a lot of faces. Whether it's from looking at booking photos, scanning surveillance video, or scouring a suspect's social media account, we are constantly searching for faces. In many respects, faces are our business. But there are just so many! The Los Angeles County booking photo system currently contains about 7 million face photos. Given an image of an unknown suspect, it doesn't seem possible that we could locate him or her in that sea of faces without the aid of facial recognition software or a magical crystal ball. But it is indeed possible! The purpose of this presentation is to show you how you can apply certain search techniques to searchable law enforcement photo databases to filter results and potentially identify a possible suspect. Some suspects are easier to locate in large photo databases based on unique physical characteristics, identifiers, or patterns of behavior. Less common crimes such as various forms of fraud, crimes that require a learned skill, or clues to a suspect's preferred geographical area of operation also provide angles in which to filter and search databases allowing us to hone in on a suspect. We will discuss what physical and behavioral characteristics to look for, what types of crimes work best, and where we can obtain clues to a suspect's geographical area. We will also take a look at several real-world examples to illustrate how these techniques have produced results. There are challenges when manually searching a large pool of faces without the aid of facial recognition software. Comparing a suspect image to a potential candidate can be difficult without applying certain facial identification practices. There is always the danger of a false identification. We will discuss and practice comparing facial features and will go over additional factors to consider when determining whether you may have a good match. When you think you have a good suspect identification, simply presenting a photo of someone that looks just like your suspect often isn't enough. We will discuss different ways to validate your findings by pulling additional corroborating information about your suspect from other investigative and public resources. We will then go over how to best present your findings to your customer. The course will mostly utilize the LA County booking photo system as an example, but many of the techniques presented here can be applied to just about any searchable photo database. Citrix invites will be sent out roughly 1 week before the webinar. Registration will CLOSE at 1700 CT the previous business day.

from http://www.iaca.net/training.asp

New IACA Class Posted: Webinar: Virtual Briefing: Creating a Weekly Crime Analysis Update Video: 1/22/2019 – 1/22/2019 in Online

Most Law Enforcement agencies hold their version of ‘briefing’ or ‘roll call’, several times a day, primarily at the beginning of each shift. They are designed to give supervisors an opportunity to take attendance, inspect uniforms and equipment, infor…

Most Law Enforcement agencies hold their version of 'briefing' or 'roll call', several times a day, primarily at the beginning of each shift. They are designed to give supervisors an opportunity to take attendance, inspect uniforms and equipment, inform officers of recent outstanding incidents, and suspects to be looking out for, and relate any legal or procedural changes. Some agencies can have 3 or more briefings a day. While it is optimally beneficial for the Crime Analyst to attend these briefings both to relay information on any series, patterns or trends they have found, and to gather information relating to incidents from officers, practically speaking, it can be impossible. In this class, we will explore the Fullerton Police Department's Weekly Crime Analysis Update Video which we have been producing since February of 2016. You will learn how to create a briefing video using Movie Maker, which is free software offered by Microsoft, and Camtasia 9, a very affordable software which boasts a Law Enforcement discount. You will also learn the elements that go into a comprehensive Crime Analysis Update Video from creating your own introduction, to the different modules of information to include, to your closing. These videos can be used to get many different types of information out to patrol. The Fullerton Police Department uses it for crime series, hot spots, parole release, prolific offender release, violent offender release, parolees at large, and the occasional training reminder. The videos, once produced, are placed on the share drive and a link is emailed out to the entire department. Supervisors in charge of briefing are responsible for playing the video in briefing, but because the link is emailed out to everyone as well, each individual is responsible for being aware of the information disseminated in the video. We have found that this is the best way for Crime Analysis to communicate with patrol on a regular basis.

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New IACA Class Posted: Fundamentals of Crime Analysis – Web Based: 10/7/2019 – 12/29/2019 in Online

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine con…

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine concepts; theories, practices, data and analysis techniques associated with the field of crime analysis for law enforcement. Additional topics that will be covered include understanding criminal behavior, behavioral geography, linking crimes, forecasting, and predication. Throughout this class, we will use case studies to apply the knowledge. Students will be able to work a crime series from start to finish. **Please note that this course is intended for brand new analysts or officers with little to no training, or executives charged with developing crime analysis programs, or self-taught journeyman analysts looking for formal training.** This course will be graded as a pass/fail. We will use a variety of ways to allow for student participation and interaction. Each week students will either have an assignment, discussion a weekly assignment. Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Textbook: Crime Analysis with Crime Mapping. 4th Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1-5063-3103-4 Students will need to purchase their textbook prior to course start date. Invitations to the course blackboard will be emailed out approximately one week prior to the start of the class.

from http://www.iaca.net/training.asp

New IACA Class Posted: Fundamentals of Crime Analysis – Web Based: 1/7/2019 – 3/31/2019 in Online

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine con…

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine concepts; theories, practices, data and analysis techniques associated with the field of crime analysis for law enforcement. Additional topics that will be covered include understanding criminal behavior, behavioral geography, linking crimes, forecasting, and predication. Throughout this class, we will use case studies to apply the knowledge. Students will be able to work a crime series from start to finish. **Please note that this course is intended for brand new analysts or officers with little to no training, or executives charged with developing crime analysis programs, or self-taught journeyman analysts looking for formal training.** This course will be graded as a pass/fail. We will use a variety of ways to allow for student participation and interaction. Each week students will either have an assignment, discussion a weekly assignment. Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Textbook: Crime Analysis with Crime Mapping. 4th Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1-5063-3103-4 Students will need to purchase their textbook prior to course start date. Invitations to the course blackboard will be emailed out approximately one week prior to the start of the class.

from http://www.iaca.net/training.asp

New IACA Class Posted: Fundamentals of Crime Analysis – Web Based: 7/8/2019 – 9/29/2019 in Online

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine con…

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine concepts; theories, practices, data and analysis techniques associated with the field of crime analysis for law enforcement. Additional topics that will be covered include understanding criminal behavior, behavioral geography, linking crimes, forecasting, and predication. Throughout this class, we will use case studies to apply the knowledge. Students will be able to work a crime series from start to finish. **Please note that this course is intended for brand new analysts or officers with little to no training, or executives charged with developing crime analysis programs, or self-taught journeyman analysts looking for formal training.** This course will be graded as a pass/fail. We will use a variety of ways to allow for student participation and interaction. Each week students will either have an assignment, discussion a weekly assignment. Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Textbook: Crime Analysis with Crime Mapping. 4th Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1-5063-3103-4 Students will need to purchase their textbook prior to course start date. Invitations to the course blackboard will be emailed out approximately one week prior to the start of the class.

from http://www.iaca.net/training.asp

New IACA Class Posted: Fundamentals of Crime Analysis – Web Based: 4/8/2019 – 6/30/2019 in Online

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine con…

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns, series, and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine concepts; theories, practices, data and analysis techniques associated with the field of crime analysis for law enforcement. Additional topics that will be covered include understanding criminal behavior, behavioral geography, linking crimes, forecasting, and predication. Throughout this class, we will use case studies to apply the knowledge. Students will be able to work a crime series from start to finish. **Please note that this course is intended for brand new analysts or officers with little to no training, or executives charged with developing crime analysis programs, or self-taught journeyman analysts looking for formal training.** This course will be graded as a pass/fail. We will use a variety of ways to allow for student participation and interaction. Each week students will either have an assignment, discussion a weekly assignment. Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Textbook: Crime Analysis with Crime Mapping. 4th Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1-5063-3103-4 Students will need to purchase their textbook prior to course start date. Invitations to the course blackboard will be emailed out approximately one week prior to the start of the class.

from http://www.iaca.net/training.asp