Ban the Box Isn’t Working for Ex-Offenders

Observation Ban the box isn’t working, but few want to train offenders for employment self-sufficiency or issue them certificates of rehabilitation. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s […]

Observation Ban the box isn’t working, but few want to train offenders for employment self-sufficiency or issue them certificates of rehabilitation. Author Leonard Adam Sipes, Jr. Thirty-five years of speaking for national and state criminal justice agencies. Interviewed multiple times by every national news outlet. Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s […]

from https://www.crimeinamerica.net

Man gets 25 years to life in prison for killing son after Disneyland trip

ALHAMBRA, Calif. — A California father who admitted killing his 5-year-old son amid a bitter custody battle was sentenced Wednesday to 25 years to life in prison during a hearing where his estranged wife wished him an eternity in hell. Aramazd Andressian Sr., 35, pleaded guilty earlier this month in Los Angeles County Superior Court…

ALHAMBRA, Calif. — A California father who admitted killing his 5-year-old son amid a bitter custody battle was sentenced Wednesday to 25 years to life in prison during a hearing where his estranged wife wished him an eternity in hell. Aramazd Andressian Sr., 35, pleaded guilty earlier this month in Los Angeles County Superior Court...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Lynwood man charged with killing woman in Montrose

A Lynwood man was charged Aug. 22 in the killing of a 67-year-old woman in Montrose, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office. 

Devon Terrell White, 20, was charged with one count of murder in the death of Hye Soon Oh, as well as one count each of robbery and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He also faces gang allegations. 

White is scheduled to return to court Sept. 6 for an arraignment hearing.

Glendale police responded about 8:30 p.m. Aug. 8 after a report of gunfire in the area. Officers found Oh on the ground near a vehicle in the open carport area of an apartment complex, said Sgt. Robert William, a department spokeswoman. She was taken to a hospital where she died at 9:40 p.m., according to coroner’s records.

Glendale detectives identified White as the gunman based on forensic evidence from the scene, officials said. He was arrested Aug. 17.

Police are still investigating to determine whether anyone else was involved in the killing.

Anyone who may have information about the investigation is asked to call the Glendale Police Department at 818-548-4991. Those who wish to remain anonymous can call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477.

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @jeromercampbell and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

A Lynwood man was charged Aug. 22 in the killing of a 67-year-old woman in Montrose, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. 

Devon Terrell White, 20, was charged with one count of murder in the death of Hye Soon Oh, as well as one count each of robbery and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He also faces gang allegations. 

White is scheduled to return to court Sept. 6 for an arraignment hearing.

Glendale police responded about 8:30 p.m. Aug. 8 after a report of gunfire in the area. Officers found Oh on the ground near a vehicle in the open carport area of an apartment complex, said Sgt. Robert William, a department spokeswoman. She was taken to a hospital where she died at 9:40 p.m., according to coroner's records.

Glendale detectives identified White as the gunman based on forensic evidence from the scene, officials said. He was arrested Aug. 17.

Police are still investigating to determine whether anyone else was involved in the killing.

Anyone who may have information about the investigation is asked to call the Glendale Police Department at 818-548-4991. Those who wish to remain anonymous can call Crime Stoppers at (800) 222-8477.

Contact the Homicide Report. Follow @jeromercampbell and @latimeshomicide on Twitter.

from http://homicide.latimes.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Flash-mob robbers are nearly unstoppable

They know how to make a run for it. Manhattan police are on the lookout for a group of roughly 10 men who have robbed a slew of running stores in the city, according to ABC7 New York. In one incident this summer, the group burst into the Jack Rabbit St…

They know how to make a run for it. Manhattan police are on the lookout for a group of roughly 10 men who have robbed a slew of running stores in the city, according to ABC7 New York. In one incident this summer, the group burst into the Jack Rabbit Store on 63rd and 3rd...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Man gets life for killing stepdaughter when she asked for food

A Michigan man convicted of killing his 5-year-old stepdaughter for waking him up and asking for food was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Thomas McClellan, 25, of Holt, was found guilty last month of first-degre…

A Michigan man convicted of killing his 5-year-old stepdaughter for waking him up and asking for food was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Thomas McClellan, 25, of Holt, was found guilty last month of first-degree murder, first-degree child abuse and first-degree arson in connection to the November 2016 death...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Wednesday round-up

Wednesday round-upWith the start of the Supreme Court’s October sitting only a little over a month away, some coverage of the court focuses on cases scheduled for oral argument during that sitting. Subscript provides a graphic explainer for Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis (and two consolidated cases), in which the Supreme Court will consider whether an […]

The post Wednesday round-up appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Wednesday round-up

With the start of the Supreme Court’s October sitting only a little over a month away, some coverage of the court focuses on cases scheduled for oral argument during that sitting. Subscript provides a graphic explainer for Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis (and two consolidated cases), in which the Supreme Court will consider whether an individual-arbitration agreement for employment-related disputes is enforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act, notwithstanding provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. At The National Law Journal (subscription or registration required), Marcia Coyle provides additional coverage on these cases, which she describes as “the biggest workplace challenge in the coming U.S. Supreme Court term.” Counting to 5 (podcast) previews three immigration-related cases scheduled for oral argument in October – Sessions v. Dimaya, Jennings v. Rodriguez and Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project.

The relationship between the Supreme Court and the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia continues to generate coverage and commentary. At The National Law Journal (subscription or registration required), Tony Mauro reports that as statues and busts of the late Chief Justice Roger Taney are taken down in Maryland, “at the U.S. Supreme Court, depictions of the author of the notorious Dred Scott decision are still visible—and not likely to disappear anytime soon.” At Take Care, Leah Litman and Helen Klein Murillo argue that the Supreme Court’s decisions in three cases from the last 15 years – Shelby County v. Holder, Grutter v. Bollinger and Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 – demonstrate reasoning similar to President Donald Trump’s in the wake of the Charlottesville violence, which they characterize as “minimization—to deny, implicitly, that something terrible and worthy of our collective condemnation had happened.”

The post Wednesday round-up appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Police Chiefs and Leading Civil Rights Organization Join to Address Hate Crimes

Recognizing the critical role law enforcement and community leaders play in responding to hate crimes, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (Lawyers’ Committee) have come together to launch a … Continue reading

Recognizing the critical role law enforcement and community leaders play in responding to hate crimes, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (Lawyers’ Committee) have come together to launch a new effort that will significantly strengthen the continuing dialogue on this serious issue. Through the establishment of an advisory committee, “Enhancing the Response to Hate Crimes,” the IACP and the Lawyers’ Committee will lead a discussion about ways to break down barriers and strengthen the relationship between law enforcement and communities that too often are the targets of hate crimes.

“The IACP is excited to be partnering with the Lawyers’ Committee to address the individual and collective harm faced in communities due to hate crime,” said Donald W. De Lucca, President of the IACP and Chief of the Doral, Florida, Police Department. “By joining forces, we will assist agencies and community leaders in effectively responding to hate crimes, providing resources, and developing solutions to prevent such incidents. Through the advisory committee, the IACP and Lawyers’ Committee will bring together unique expertise to establish an achievable action agenda that will help stakeholders across the United States respond quickly to these crimes, making a lasting impact on victims and their communities.”  When the action agenda is completed, the IACP and the Lawyers’ Committee will seek public and private funding to support implementation.

“The tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia serve as a chilling reminder that too many communities are the targets of hate-fueled acts.  In these difficult moments, we must redouble our efforts to combat hate.  That includes a thoughtful dialogue among law enforcement and the civil rights community to ensure the needs of targeted communities, including racial and religious minorities, LGBT, and the handicapped are addressed,” said Kristen Clarke, President and Executive Director of the Lawyers’ Committee. “The Lawyers’ Committee is proud to partner with the IACP in launching such an important discussion with all key stakeholders on how best to respond to hate crimes.”

Hate incidents and hate crimes have a devastating effect on individual victims and entire communities, as recent events across the country have made clear. The advisory committee being announced today will focus on incidents that are motivated by actual or perceived race, national origin, religious background, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability of any person. The committee will also discuss the many legal, economic, emotional, social, and safety issues that arise in the wake of hate incidents and propose recommendations on how best to respond. Members of the new advisory committee will include law enforcement and civil rights leaders, advocates, academic experts, and victims of hate crime.

The advisory committee will convene its first meeting on September 19, 2017. The committee will establish a comprehensive action agenda for public officials, community leaders, law enforcement officers, and justice system leaders to help them create a seamless response to hate crimes. This action agenda, once funded and implemented, will help improve the safety of all individuals threatened by hate through the protection of their civil rights.

About the International Association of Chiefs of Police

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is a professional association for law enforcement worldwide. For more than 120 years, the IACP has been launching internationally acclaimed programs, speaking on behalf of law enforcement, conducting groundbreaking research, and providing exemplary programs and services to members across the globe.

Today, the IACP continues to be recognized as a leader in these areas. By maximizing the collective efforts of the membership, IACP actively supports law enforcement through advocacy, outreach, education, and programs.

Through ongoing strategic partnerships across the public safety spectrum, the IACP provides members with resources and support in all aspects of law enforcement policy and operations. These tools help members perform their jobs effectively, efficiently, and safely while also educating the public on the role of law enforcement to help build sustainable community relations.

About the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

The Lawyers’ Committee, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, was formed in 1963 at the request of President John F. Kennedy to involve the private bar in providing legal services to address racial discrimination. Now in its 54th year, the Lawyers’ Committee is continuing its quest to “Move America Toward Justice.” The principal mission of the Lawyers’ Committee is to secure, through the rule of law, equal justice for all, particularly in the areas of criminal justice, fair housing and community development, economic justice, educational opportunities, and voting rights.

As a Communities Against Hate partner, the Lawyers’ Committee leads the Stop Hate Project. The Stop Hate Project works to strengthen the capacity of community leaders, local government, law enforcement, and organizations around the country to combat hate by connecting these groups with legal and social services resources and creating new ones in response to identified needs.  The Project’s resource and reporting hotline for hate incidents, 1-844-9-NO-HATE (1-844-966-4283), connects people and organizations combating hate with the resources and support they need.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Video Gambling Linked to Crime Spike: Study

A new study led by economists at the University of Illinois found that access to video gambling caused an increase in violent crime and property crime in Chicago.

A new study led by economists at the University of Illinois suggests that access to video gambling is responsible for an increase of violent crime and property crime in Chicago.

The Video Gaming Act of Illinois took effect in 2012, allowing local businesses with a liquor license to have up to four gambling terminals; presently, there are somewhere around 6,000 video gambling parlors in the state. Chicago maintains its 1993 ban on gambling, but access to video gambling has increased in the city thanks to its adoption by neighboring municipalities.

Unlike other gambling studies which have been region- or state- specific, the authors analyzed block-level data. Drawing on police reports between January 2006 and June 2016, as well as monthly data on establishments with video gambling from the Illinois Gaming Board, the study found that “access to gambling adds on average 0.10 and 0.28 violent and property crimes per block group each month.

In other words, legalizing video gambling has contributed to approximately 1,450 and 4,100 additional violent and property crimes in Chicago since the Video Gaming Act took effect.”

While former studies have found a positive link between casinos and increased crime, the authors point out that “crime effects due to casino openings are driven by multiple mechanisms, not just gambling itself,” including an increase of visitors to counties where a casino has opened. By looking at video gambling only, researchers were able to eliminate factors extraneous to gambling.

“The effect of access to video gambling on crime seems to be permanent. It increases
over time and stabilizes after twelve to eighteen months,” the study concludes.

Within the blocks closest to video gaming establishments, the authors found:

  • Most of the effects on violent crimes are driven by robbery, which increased by 13.1%
  • Statistically significant increases in aggravated battery (5.99%) and sexual assault (14.1%).
  • No statistically significant effects for homicide or aggravated assault.
  • Increase in property crime, mostly driven by an increase in motor vehicle thefts of 12.3%
  • Burglary and larceny also increased by 5.6% and 4.78%

This summary was prepared by Deputy Content Editor Victoria Mckenzie. The full report, authored by Nicolas Bottan, Andres Ham, and Ignacio Sarmiento-Barbieri, can be downloaded here. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Toothless man accused of biting woman, leaving her a ‘bloody mess’

A drunken, toothless man told his girlfriend that he was “going to eat her face off” before biting her nose and leaving her a “bloody mess” inside a Michigan hotel room, court records show. Darryl Socia, 40, faces up to five years in prison for domestic violence after police were called to the AmericInn Hotel…

A drunken, toothless man told his girlfriend that he was “going to eat her face off” before biting her nose and leaving her a “bloody mess” inside a Michigan hotel room, court records show. Darryl Socia, 40, faces up to five years in prison for domestic violence after police were called to the AmericInn Hotel...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

NJ Bail Reform Works; Prosecution, Defense Complain

New Jersey’s use of an algorithm to advise judges on pretrial release “is what the new vision of American justice looks like,” NBC News reports. Six months into the new practice, New Jersey jails are already starting to empty, and the number of people locked up while awaiting trial has dropped.

New Jersey’s use of an algorithm to advise judges on pretrial release “is what the new vision of American justice looks like,” NBC News reports. Created by data scientists and criminal-justice researchers, the algorithm — one of dozens of “risk assessment tools” being used around the U.S. — promises to use data to scrub the system of bias by keeping only the most dangerous defendants behind bars, regardless of socioeconomic status. Six months into the new practice, New Jersey jails are already starting to empty, and the number of people locked up while awaiting trial has dropped.

It’s also clear that data is no wonder drug. The new system — driven by years of research involving hundreds of thousands of cases and requiring multimillion-dollar technology upgrades and the hiring of more judges, prosecutors and court workers — still produces contentious decisions about who deserves freedom and who does not. Police officials and prosecutors complain about the release of people charged with gun crimes, fleeing police, attacking an officer, sex offenses and domestic violence, and of those who keep getting re-arrested. In at least two cases, people have been killed by men who’d been released on earlier charges. The bail bond industry, facing extinction, has backed two federal lawsuits seeking to end the algorithm’s use. Defense lawyers and civil rights advocates say people who pose little risk have been ordered detained, only to be given plea deals or have their charges dropped. They fear that authorities are exploiting the new system to generate convictions. It remains unclear whether the new approach will reduce racial disparities, drive down crime rates or be fiscally sustainable. If it works in New Jersey, it could become a model for the rest of the nation.

from https://thecrimereport.org