‘The Joker’ foiled again — this time on gun charge

The Joker is back — behind bars, that is. Lawrence Sullivan, a 30-year-old Florida man whose heavily-tattooed face resembles that of Batman’s primary nemesis, was busted in Pinellas County on Tuesday after a warrant was issued in Miami-Dade County for a concealed-carry firearms offense, WFLA reports. Sullivan, of Gulfport, remains held without bail as of…

The Joker is back — behind bars, that is. Lawrence Sullivan, a 30-year-old Florida man whose heavily-tattooed face resembles that of Batman’s primary nemesis, was busted in Pinellas County on Tuesday after a warrant was issued in Miami-Dade County for a concealed-carry firearms offense, WFLA reports. Sullivan, of Gulfport, remains held without bail as of...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Thieves swiped personal items from sleeping guests at Standard Hotel: cops

A pair of thieves is targeting the Standard Hotel in the Meatpacking District, snatching debit cards and IDs from unlocked rooms — as guests sleep soundly in bed, cops said Thursday. The first incident happened at the luxe hotel on Oct. 2 just before 2 a.m., when the duo stole two IDs and a debit…

A pair of thieves is targeting the Standard Hotel in the Meatpacking District, snatching debit cards and IDs from unlocked rooms — as guests sleep soundly in bed, cops said Thursday. The first incident happened at the luxe hotel on Oct. 2 just before 2 a.m., when the duo stole two IDs and a debit...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

States Show Reduction in Recidivism Rates-Study

States are showing a reduction in their three-year return-to-prison rates, according to new data revealed by the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center. They tracked data from 11 state corrections agencies to reveal significant multiyear declines in reincarceration rates since their peak years of recidivism.

States are showing a reduction in their three-year return-to-prison rates, according to new data revealed by the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center

“Reducing Recidivism: States Deliver Results,” an ongoing series by the CSG Justice Center, tracked data from 11 state corrections agencies to reveal significant multiyear declines in reincarceration rates since their peak years of recidivism.

They found that diverse states—from New Jersey to South Dakota—showed reductions in the number of people returning to prison.

For instance, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wisconsin showed reductions in recidivism of 20 percent or more.

“Despite the progress we’ve made over the last two decades toward embracing recidivism reduction as a central mission of corrections agencies, some remain skeptical that these numbers can truly drop- but this report is further evidence that they not only can decrease, but in many states, they are,” said Harold Clarke, director of Virginia’s Department of Corrections.

The report also points to federal investments over the last decade that have accelerated state-level progress by funding programs that pursue research-based approaches to recidivism reduction.

These approaches include: tracking data, precise use of risk and needs assessments, strengthening supervision, and connecting people to post-release services.

“Ohio’s three-year recidivism rate dropped 20 percent over the last seven years. That is progress we would not have achieved without the federal support,” said Tom Stickrath, superintendent of Ohio’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation, in the study.

“This report shines a light on how federal funding provided through legislation like the Second Chance Act gives states the ability to learn from the work of others, apply research-driven approaches, and hold themselves accountable by tracking progress through data analysis.”

A full copy of the report can be found here. 

from https://thecrimereport.org

20 Years for ‘Swatting’ Pranks, One That Caused a Death

The first case in which a death resulted from a hoax call to police in a practice known as “swatting” resulted in a plea deal carrying at least 20 years in prison for the defendant, who was convicted of numerous other prank calls.

A Los Angeles man accused of making a hoax phone call that led to what cybersecurity experts believe was the first death of its kind in the U.S. will serve at least 20 years in prison, the Los Angeles Times reports. Tyler Barriss, 25, pleaded guilty to 51 separate charges brought by federal prosecutors in Kansas, California and Washington, D.C., for the “swatting” call that led to a fatal police shooting in Kansas and for placing dozens of similar calls, including one to FBI headquarters in Washington and another that may have delayed a hearing on net neutrality last year, authorities said.

On Dec. 28, 2017, Barriss placed a phone call to the Wichita Police Department claiming that he had murdered his father and was holding other relatives hostage at gunpoint at a Wichita home, court records show. Police responded to the address Barriss provided and were met by 28-year-old Andrew Finch, who exited the residence confused and placed his hands near his waistband. The responding officers, thinking they were facing an armed murder suspect, shot and killed Finch, authorities have said. Finch was unarmed and police quickly discovered no one had been injured or held at gunpoint at the home. Barriss, who was previously arrested for phoning in bomb threats to schools and television stations in Southern California, made the phone call as part of a dispute stemming from a game of “Call of Duty: World at War,” a popular first-person shooter game, according to a federal indictment unsealed in May.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Private Prison Cash Poured Into 2018 Campaigns

Private prison companies poured record amounts of money into the 2018 elections, more than three times as much as the industry spent in any other midterm year. Public records follow the trail of cash from Congress to state and local races.

Private prison companies poured record amounts of money into the 2018 elections—more than $1.6 million in federally disclosed contributions as of mid-October, reports Mother Jones, based on data from the Center for Responsive Politics. That’s more than three times as much as the industry spent in any other midterm year, and about the same as its spending in the 2016 election, when Hillary Clinton called for an end to private prisons.

A large proportion of that money appears to have gone to candidates in Florida, home of the country’s largest private prison company, the Boca Raton-based GEO Group. Outside Florida, GEO donated more than $430,000 to committees and candidates at the state level, according to the National Institute for Money in Politics. Much of that spending was in states with some of the highest incarceration rates in the world, like Alabama (where GEO gave $52,500), Oklahoma ($53,500), and Texas ($43,500). In Texas, GEO also directed about $25,000 toward elections for county commissioners and judges in districts where the company operates immigration detention centers, according to Federal Election Commission filings. Democratic control of the U.S. House means that private prison companies will likely have fewer allies on the strategically important Homeland Security appropriations subcommittee, which oversees ICE’s budget for detaining immigrants — the source of a quarter of GEO’s revenue last year. Members of the subcommittee are some of the top congressional recipients of private prison campaign cash. That includes Rep. John Culberson (R-Texas), who received $44,000 in contributions from the industry this cycle, only to be defeated by Democratic upstart Lizzie Fletcher. Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas) won reelection after taking $36,400 from the prison industry, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Cuellar is perhaps the industry’s most vocal Democratic defender.

from https://thecrimereport.org

9-year-old girl holds vigil for man her father’s accused of killing

The 9-year-old daughter of a man charged with murder in Kentucky organized a vigil for the man killed in the attack. Shyla Joseph, from Louisville, planned a dinner with a special balloon release ceremony in memory of Antonio Sparks, who was allegedly stabbed to death outside his home by the girl’s father, Shilo Joseph, WDRB…

The 9-year-old daughter of a man charged with murder in Kentucky organized a vigil for the man killed in the attack. Shyla Joseph, from Louisville, planned a dinner with a special balloon release ceremony in memory of Antonio Sparks, who was allegedly stabbed to death outside his home by the girl’s father, Shilo Joseph, WDRB...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Petitions of the week

Petitions of the weekThis week we highlight petitions pending before the Supreme Court that address whether plaintiffs may obtain certification of issue classes for a cause of action under Rule 23(c)(4) without having demonstrated that common issues predominate under Rule 23(b)(3), the creation of a particular inferred private right of action via Section 14(e) of the Securities Exchange […]

The post Petitions of the week appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Petitions of the week

This week we highlight petitions pending before the Supreme Court that address whether plaintiffs may obtain certification of issue classes for a cause of action under Rule 23(c)(4) without having demonstrated that common issues predominate under Rule 23(b)(3), the creation of a particular inferred private right of action via Section 14(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and the constitutionality of the subsection-specific definition of “crime of violence” in 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3)(B).

The petitions of the week are:

18-459

Issue: Whether the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit correctly held, in express disagreement with five other courts of appeals, that Section 14(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 supports an inferred private right of action based on the negligent misstatement or omission made in connection with a tender offer.

18-472

Issue: Whether plaintiffs, having failed to demonstrate that common issues predominate over individual issues as to their cause of action under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23(b)(3), may nevertheless obtain certification of issue classes for that cause of action under Rule 23(c)(4).

18-428

Issue: Whether the subsection-specific definition of ”crime of violence” in 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3)(B), which applies only in the limited context of a federal criminal prosecution for possessing, using or carrying a firearm in connection with acts comprising such a crime, is unconstitutionally vague.

18-431

Issue: Whether the subsection-specific definition of “crime of violence” in 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(3)(B), which applies only in the limited context of a federal criminal prosecution for possessing, using or carrying a firearm in connection with acts comprising such a crime, is unconstitutionally vague.

The post Petitions of the week appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Why Philly Cops and Docs Swear By ‘Scoop and Run’

Philadelphia stands alone among cities with high violent crime rates for its devotion to a first-responder strategy in which police cars race shooting and stabbing victims to hospitals rather than wait for ambulances. In every-second-counts trauma care, they say it saves lives — and buffs the image of the cops.

Among cities with the highest rates of homicide, Philadelphia is the only one where police routinely rush gunshot and stab wound victims to the nearest trauma center instead of waiting for an ambulance, The Trace reports. The practice — known as “scoop and run” or “scoop and go” — has little science behind it to show that it increases survival rates markedly. And other cities cite a litany of reasons why they don’t push the practice. But Philadelphia trauma doctors believe it saves lives. “Patients often survive the initial gunshot, but unfortunately a large number of them bleed out fairly quickly, within seconds and minutes,” says Marcin Jankowski, the head of trauma and surgical critical care at Hahnemann University Hospital, one of the city’s eight trauma centers. Doctors say the faster these patients can get to a trauma center, the better their chances at survival.

“Scoop and run” is deeply entrenched among the city’s law enforcement officers, who focus their patrol in areas with the highest instances of violent crime and, as a result, frequently beat EMS to crime scenes. Last year, a third of Philadelphia’s 1,223 shooting victims were delivered to a city trauma center in the back of a police cruiser or wagon. At Temple University Hospital, the busiest hospital for gunshot patients in the state, about 70 percent of victims of penetrating trauma arrive by police vehicle or private vehicle, or simply walk in. Beyond its life-saving potential, some say scoop and run could enhance public safety in communities with broad distrust of police. When officers lift victims into the backseats of their cars, they become true first responders, shifting roles from enforcer to guardian, from soldier to protector.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Cleveland Jail Deaths Prompt Resignation Amid Probes

Just months after six inmates died in a four-month span and days ahead of an expected federal marshal’s report about how the jail in Cleveland is run, the top jail official has resigned.

The top jail official of Ohio’s most populous county resigned late Wednesday, just months after six inmates died in a four-month span and days ahead of an expected report by the U.S. Marshals about how the jail in Cleveland is run, The Plain Dealer reportsKen Mills’ resignation also came days after a strong rebuke from all 34 Cuyahoga County Common Pleas judges who said Mills’ jail was unsafe and inmates were not getting proper medical or mental health care. The letter, written by Administrative Judge John J. Russo, said the judges can no longer rely on the word of jail administrators, who have promised that changes are being made to improve conditions at the jail.

Mills, hired in 2014 to spearhead a plan for regionalizing the county’s local jails, was in charge of day-to-day operations at the jail, where the six inmates died from June 22 to Oct. 2, including three by suicide. A day after the most recent death, Cleveland Municipal Judge Michael Nelson said he would no longer send non-violent offenders to jail because it was unsafe. The county’s top executive asked U.S. Marshal Pete Elliott to conduct a review of the jail after the sixth death. The marshals’ report is expected in the coming days. The FBI is also looking into possible civil rights violations of inmates at the jail.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Portland Bid to Limit Protests Fails By One Vote

A proposal to give the mayor more power to limit political protests in Portland, Ore., failed to win city council approval. Portland has been the scene of numerous and often-violent clashes between right- and left-wing protesters.

Portland, Ore.’s city council has voted down a proposed ordinance that would have given the mayor new powers to restrict political protests, The Oregonian reports. The proposal, which lost by one vote was Mayor Ted Wheeler’s response to the city’s string of often-violent clashes between right-wing and left-wing protesters. This leaves the city of Portland, viewed by many people as a liberal bastion, vulnerable to more protests led by right-wing activists who bait opponents to show up in force. How police will keep them apart and keep participants and bystanders safe remains an open question. To date, whether police turned out in force or were badly outnumbered, such dueling protests have led to injuries, arrests and property damage.

Wheeler’s ordinance would have given him the power to issue orders dictating the conditions of protests if the group or groups planning to demonstrate had a history of violence and, in his judgment, would jeopardize public safety. The mayor said he and Police Chief Danielle Outlaw developed the idea in response to the increasing number of violent demonstrations in Portland since 2016, during which right-wing protesters often provoke left-wing counter-demonstrators into fisticuffs or fighting with improvised weapons. Wheeler repeated his talking points Wednesday — calling his proposal legal, reasonable and necessary — while criticizing news coverage that called into question whether restricting protests is constitutional. But council members who voted against the measure expressed qualms about expanding police powers and hopes that less drastic alternative strategies will be found.

from https://thecrimereport.org