‘Dr. BumBum’ gets his butt thrown in jail after patient death

The Brazilian celebrity plastic surgeon nicknamed “Dr. BumBum” was busted this week — five days after he went on the run following the death of one of his patients who died after a procedure to enlarge her derrière, according to a new report. Dr. Denis Cesar Barros Furtado was arrested Thursday at an office complex…

The Brazilian celebrity plastic surgeon nicknamed “Dr. BumBum” was busted this week — five days after he went on the run following the death of one of his patients who died after a procedure to enlarge her derrière, according to a new report. Dr. Denis Cesar Barros Furtado was arrested Thursday at an office complex...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Woman tried to extort married man who left phone at bar: cops

A woman in Florida tried to extort $500 from a married man who left his cellphone unattended at a bar by threatening to tell his wife he cheated on her, police said. Briyana Andrea Valls, 22, is facing charges of grand theft and extortion after police …

A woman in Florida tried to extort $500 from a married man who left his cellphone unattended at a bar by threatening to tell his wife he cheated on her, police said. Briyana Andrea Valls, 22, is facing charges of grand theft and extortion after police in Davie say she victimized a man who went...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Teen killed neighbors hours after his mom kicked him out: cops

A teen accused of fatally stabbing his neighbors in April was booted from his Texas home just hours before the double killing, according to a newly released police report. Jorge Carmond, 17, is accused in the stabbing deaths of John Smith, 61, and Meli…

A teen accused of fatally stabbing his neighbors in April was booted from his Texas home just hours before the double killing, according to a newly released police report. Jorge Carmond, 17, is accused in the stabbing deaths of John Smith, 61, and Melinda Smith, 59, who were attacked at their South Bexar County home...

from https://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Rising Prison Health Care Costs Increase Burden on State Corrections: Pew

In order to cope with the cost of caring for inmates growing older and sicker behind bars, state prison officials are taking advantage of Medicaid subsidies to send more incarcerated individuals to offsite hospitals or, in some cases, turning to high-tech approaches like telemedicine, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

America’s aging prison population is putting new strains on health care costs for state corrections authorities, according to a study by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

In order to cope with the cost of caring for inmates growing older and sicker behind bars, prison officials are taking advantage of Medicaid subsidies to send more incarcerated individuals to offsite hospitals or, in some cases turning to high-tech approaches like telemedicine, the study found.

“Corrections departments face rising health care costs for the foreseeable future,” said the study, which drew on two 50-state surveys conducted by Pew and the Vera Institute of Justice, as well as interviews with more than 75 state officials.

The main driver of health care in state prisons today is the increasing share of incarcerated individuals 55 or over, said the study authors, noting that in 44 states which responded to questions on this issue, the elderly population increased by a median of 41 percent between 2010 and 2015.

“Most incarcerated individuals experience the effects of age sooner than people outside prison because of such issues as substance use disorder, often inadequate preventive and primary care before incarceration, and stress linked to isolation and the sometimes violent environment in prison,” the study said.

Even when appropriate facilities are available inside a prison, rising costs are driving corrections authorities to send ailing inmates  to hospitals, where they can qualify for Medicaid coverage—which under federal law is otherwise unavailable to the incarcerated. Under the Affordable Care Act, states can expand the number of  low-income people aged 65 or over who can qualify  for Medicaid, and prisoners with little income can be covered by definition under this umbrella.

According to Pew, an increasing number of corrections officials in states that have opted for Medicaid expansion, which allows them to receive federal reimbursement for at least half of the costs, are taking advantage of the opportunity.

Virginia, for instance spent 27 percent of its prison health care budget on offsite hospital care in 2015.

But hospital care for the incarcerated can be a lot pricier than ordinary care, because of the additional costs of providing secure transportation and 24-hour guards. (There have been several cases where prisoners escaped from custody while enroute to hospitals.)

With more than one million adults in state prisons, authorities are “under increasing pressure to contain hospitalization costs while also ensuring the constitutional right to ‘reasonably adequate care,” the study noted.

One alternative approach used by some states to reduce costs involves the use of telemedicine and mobile health services that allow inmates to be diagnosed without ever leaving prison grounds.

Texas, for example, now conducts 11,000 patient-doctor video conferences a month for inmates—second only to the U.S. military. Some states lease a mobile mammography van to administer cancer screening tests inside their prisons for female inmates.

But while the shift to Medicaid has saved states “millions of dollars” in prison health care costs, states’ future ability to use the program may be in doubt as a result of  government efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

That only increases the burden on state policymaker “to look for ways to trim costs, especially as their prison population ages and requires more intensive and frequent care,” the study said.

The full study can be downloaded here.

This summary was prepared by Stephen Handelman, editor of The Crime Report. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Rising Prison Health Care Costs Increase Burden on State Corrections: Pew

In order to cope with the cost of caring for inmates growing older and sicker behind bars, state prison officials are taking advantage of Medicaid subsidies to send more incarcerated individuals to offsite hospitals or, in some cases, turning to high-tech approaches like telemedicine, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

America’s aging prison population is putting new strains on health care costs for state corrections authorities, according to a study by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

In order to cope with the cost of caring for inmates growing older and sicker behind bars, prison officials are taking advantage of Medicaid subsidies to send more incarcerated individuals to offsite hospitals or, in some cases turning to high-tech approaches like telemedicine, the study found.

“Corrections departments face rising health care costs for the foreseeable future,” said the study, which drew on two 50-state surveys conducted by Pew and the Vera Institute of Justice, as well as interviews with more than 75 state officials.

The main driver of health care in state prisons today is the increasing share of incarcerated individuals 55 or over, said the study authors, noting that in 44 states which responded to questions on this issue, the elderly population increased by a median of 41 percent between 2010 and 2015.

“Most incarcerated individuals experience the effects of age sooner than people outside prison because of such issues as substance use disorder, often inadequate preventive and primary care before incarceration, and stress linked to isolation and the sometimes violent environment in prison,” the study said.

Even when appropriate facilities are available inside a prison, rising costs are driving corrections authorities to send ailing inmates  to hospitals, where they can qualify for Medicaid coverage—which under federal law is otherwise unavailable to the incarcerated. Under the Affordable Care Act, states can expand the number of  low-income people aged 65 or over who can qualify  for Medicaid, and prisoners with little income can be covered by definition under this umbrella.

According to Pew, an increasing number of corrections officials in states that have opted for Medicaid expansion, which allows them to receive federal reimbursement for at least half of the costs, are taking advantage of the opportunity.

Virginia, for instance spent 27 percent of its prison health care budget on offsite hospital care in 2015.

But hospital care for the incarcerated can be a lot pricier than ordinary care, because of the additional costs of providing secure transportation and 24-hour guards. (There have been several cases where prisoners escaped from custody while enroute to hospitals.)

With more than one million adults in state prisons, authorities are “under increasing pressure to contain hospitalization costs while also ensuring the constitutional right to ‘reasonably adequate care,” the study noted.

One alternative approach used by some states to reduce costs involves the use of telemedicine and mobile health services that allow inmates to be diagnosed without ever leaving prison grounds.

Texas, for example, now conducts 11,000 patient-doctor video conferences a month for inmates—second only to the U.S. military. Some states lease a mobile mammography van to administer cancer screening tests inside their prisons for female inmates.

But while the shift to Medicaid has saved states “millions of dollars” in prison health care costs, states’ future ability to use the program may be in doubt as a result of  government efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

That only increases the burden on state policymaker “to look for ways to trim costs, especially as their prison population ages and requires more intensive and frequent care,” the study said.

The full study can be downloaded here.

This summary was prepared by Stephen Handelman, editor of The Crime Report. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Friday round-up

Friday round-upJudge Brett Kavanaugh remains atop the slow-moving Supreme Court news cycle. Adam Liptak of The New York Times surveys 12 sets of evaluations spanning 700 pages from about 350 law students at Harvard, Yale and Georgetown and finds “almost only glowing praise for Judge Kavanaugh’s teaching.” Former Harvard students praise Kavanaugh in a letter at […]

The post Friday round-up appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

Friday round-up

Judge Brett Kavanaugh remains atop the slow-moving Supreme Court news cycle. Adam Liptak of The New York Times surveys 12 sets of evaluations spanning 700 pages from about 350 law students at Harvard, Yale and Georgetown and finds “almost only glowing praise for Judge Kavanaugh’s teaching.” Former Harvard students praise Kavanaugh in a letter at Boston Globe.

Lorraine Woellert of Politico covers the refusal of New York Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and other Democratic leaders to meet with Kavanaugh, “another salvo in the deepening cold war” between Trump and Schumer. Elise Viebeck of The Washington Post reports that Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, said Wednesday that senators expect to receive “at least 1 million pages of documents” related to Kavanaugh’s time in President George W. Bush’s administration and as a Republican “political operative,” which Viebeck calls “a sign of a mammoth task that could slow the timeline for confirmation hearings.” Coverage on polling about Kavanaugh’s possible confirmation – from Gallup, the Pew Research Center and Fox News – comes from Alex Lubben for Vice News and Nathaniel Rakich of FiveThirtyEight.

Commentary on the confirmation process comes from Kent Greenfield on WBUR’s Cognoscenti blog, who contends that the “Senate should wait to vote on Kavanaugh until we can be sure Trump’s entire presidency is not illegitimate because of espionage, conspiracy, collusion and — yes — treason.” Dahlia Lithwick and Jed Shugerman of Slate credit Kavanaugh for “his candor in taking his stands against Roe last year,” but argue that this topic “must also be addressed directly during his confirmation.”

David Savage of Los Angeles Times reports that the “Supreme Court could have a conservative majority to strike down bans on semi-automatic weapons in California and other liberal states and to decree that law-abiding Americans have a right to carry a gun in public.” Mark Sherman and Jennifer Peltz of Associated Press report that although Kavanaugh’s record on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit does not “directly deal with LGBT issues,” “his approach to judging leads some scholars and activists to believe he is unlikely to echo Kennedy’s votes.” For this blog, Tejinder Singh reviews Kavanaugh’s dissent in a challenge to the Affordable Care Act, Seven-Sky v. Holder. Richard Wolf of USA Today reports that even as Kavanaugh has been a “reliable conservative vote” on the D.C. Circuit, he “has displayed a degree of understanding that often borders on empathy for the policy goals of those he rules against.” Eric Posner on his eponymous blog assesses Kavanaugh and claims that “[w]hatever he is, he’s not an originalist, at least not by self-identification. Not yet, anyway.”

Traci Yoder at the National Lawyers Guild blog expresses concern about Kavanaugh’s confirmation and encourages better organizing on the left, while Anthony Marcum in an op-ed for The Hill suggests that even “if Kavanaugh is confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court, there will inevitably be some surprises.” Oliver Roeder of FiveThirtyEight conducts the “morbid exercise” of assessing how long the current justices are likely to stay on the bench.

One of the term’s major cases was Janus v. AFSCME, in which the Supreme Court overruled Abood v. Detroit Board of Education and held that the state of Illinois’ extraction of agency fees from nonconsenting public-sector employees violates the First Amendment. Aaron Tang at Take Care looks at lawsuits about refunds for fair-share fees collected before the decision, which he sees as unlikely to succeed. Jennifer Mueller of Slate assesses the logic underpinning the decision and suggests it may be “bad news for public pensions” as well.

Briefly:

  • Sheldon Nahmod on his eponymous blog analyzes the Supreme Court’s decision this term in Lozman v. Riviera Beach, in which the court held that existence of probable cause for Fane Lozman’s arrest for disrupting a city council meeting does not bar his First Amendment retaliatory arrest claim under the circumstances of this case.
  • Tony Mauro of The National Law Journal (registration required) reports that two petitions involving Bill Cosby “are drawing interest, in part because the justices have not recently taken up disputes over libel and defamation, a part of First Amendment doctrine that is well-settled.”

The post Friday round-up appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Shutdown of Sex Sites Puts Lives at Risk, say Indigenous Women

The so-called FOSTA-SESTA legislation aimed at curbing sex trafficking has increased the vulnerability of women in tribal lands for whom sex work is often the only way of earning a living, a Native American call-in show was told Thursday.

A law signed by President Donald Trump this spring to curb sex trafficking has created new risks for sex workers in tribal lands, Native American women and advocates said Thursday.

The women, speaking on Native America Calling, a live call-in program dedicated to issues specific to Native communities, charged that the so-called FOSTA-SESTA legislation has made life more “dangerous” for sex workers—and has left Native American women especially vulnerable.

“The intention sounds positive, but the impact that [the law] has on people who are being trafficked and on sex workers is pretty negative,” said Becki Jones, a sexual health educator for Planned Parenthood of The Rocky Mountains, and a member of the Diné tribe.

The House bill known as the Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (FOSTA) and the Senate bill, the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA), which were combined into a single package, were welcomed by some groups as a victory for sex trafficking victims.

But, said Jones, FOSTA-SESTA’s restrictions on commercial sex sites effectively removed sex workers ability to the “screen for particular clients that might be super violent.”

By shutting down what amounted to protective online resources for sex workers, the measures in effect closed off a source of networking and mutual aid for women whose occupations often left them victims to violent predators.

The show’s guests said many Native American women turned to sex work because of the scarce opportunities for other work in a climate where tribal values largely empower men.

With few other work options open to women, they said sex work deserves legal protection and must be de-stigmatized.

“The stigma is definitely hard to talk about and combat,” said Jones. “I hear it in the classroom, too. One way I can combat and stand up for sex workers is to help squash myths (such as) talking about how sex workers are ‘dirty’, or have unprotected sex, when in general a lot of sex workers take really good care of themselves, of their bodies, and of their health.

The central intention of the law is to crack down on online prostitution rings. Its supporters claim that one key measurement of success will be its ability to reduce female homicide rates resulting from Craigslist personals ads.

Nonetheless, participants in the “Native America Calling” program said, the law has also had the consequence of forcing sex workers to revert to street walking and other high-risk methods of the sex trade.

“There are not a lot of resources for sex workers, and a lot of law enforcement were getting tips from these websites, as well,” said Jones.

Online sex work allows a worker to screen the individual requesting sex, and gives the worker the agency of selecting her client, rather than being forced to accept any and all requests, she said.

Until the passage in April of FOSTA-SESTA, Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act ensured that user-generated content that was posted to websites was not the legal responsibility of the website to police.

Now, under the FOSTA-SESTA laws, websites themselves are responsible for such content. Many websites have thus deleted sexual classified ads and services, consensual or not.

“These new laws are completely dangerous,” said Cheyenne Antonio, another Diné, who is Sex Trafficking Program Coordinator of the Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women, and an advocate of legalizing prostitution.

“Sex work is a human right, and the criminalization of sex work was the root of the problem.”

However, none of the guests on show said they would advise or encourage a young person to enter the sex industry.

“The only reason that sex work is more dangerous is because it’s not legally protected,” said Alex Trujillo (of the Diné and Laguna Pueblo), and a trans sex worker.

“There are no laws in place to protect sex workers, and if we face violence we can’t go to the police because prostitution is illegal. We’re being murdered as trans women at really fast rates.”

Alex was raped in high school, and after graduating she became a sex worker.

“My sisters are having to go back to pimps,” she said. “It’s really heartbreaking, and this bill has messed up our lives in ways you can’t imagine.”

Trujillo spoke about the importance of philosophically distinguishing between selling yourself and selling a service.

“It’s like any other form of labor,” she said. “I feel like if we separate selling yourself from selling a service; that’s really important because selling yourself is dehumanizing, but that’s not what sex workers are doing.”

The distinction between sex workers and victims of sex trafficking was a distinction that the program’s guests were eager to point out, as part of raising awareness around sex work and to humanize those who work in the sex industry.

“This bill was put in place by rich white men, and when I was doing in-person escorting, that was 90 percent of my clientele,” said Trujillo. “I feel like the reason this has been done is because if it was legalized there would be ways to trace it back to see, oh, this person paid for sex work.”

Antonio wrapped up the program by describing her organization and the importance of having a conversation with sex workers about on what screening “looks like now that we can’t practice sex work online.”

The organization does street outreach, but Jones said more services are needed, such as “drop-in centers, condoms…we need to share as many resources as we can and maintain our visibility on the streets.”

The full program can be accessed here.

In an earlier program, Native American transgender inmates revealed abuses they had suffered since the Trump Administration reversed measures aimed at helping them avoid discrimination behind bars.

John Ramsey is a news intern for The Crime Report. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Legal Pot: Good for Public Safety, But Not for Mental Health?

Two new studies of the impact of state legalization of marijuana offer a mixed verdict. One uncovered an association between legal pot and increased crime clearance, while the other detected a correlation between legalization and the frequency of serious mental illnesses.

While the sale and possession of marijuana remain federal offenses, the state-level impact of legalization on public health and safety has been hotly debated.

Two new studies demonstrate that legalization can be a mixed bag: one finds a correlation between legalization and the frequency of serious mental illnesses, while the other uncovers an association between legalization and increased crime clearance.

Advocates have long asserted that police effectiveness would increase if marijuana were legal, because officers would have more time and resources to devote to other offenses.

In “Marijuana Legalization and Crime Clearance Rates: Testing Proponent Assertions in Colorado and Washington State,” researchers find that this claim holds up under scrutiny.

The paper, published this month in Police Quarterly, notes significant increases in the clearance rate—the ratio between the number of crimes solved and the total number of crimes recorded by the police—for violent crime in both Colorado and Washington state, the first two states to legalize recreational cannabis, following legalization.

The data did not allow the study’s authors to attribute the increased clearance rate to legalization or to posit why the observed trend occurred. But the timing and the lack of other probable explanations lead them to hypothesize that legalization did indeed enable officers to focus on other crimes.

Notably, national trends remained relatively flat during the time period examined, and there were no kinds of crime in either state for which legalization negatively impacted clearance rates.

The authors of the paper, all from Washington State University, were David A. Makin, Dale W. Willits, Guangzhen Wu, Kathryn O. DuBois, Ruibin Lu, Mary K. Stohr, Wendy Koslicki, Duane Stanton, Craig Hemmens, John Snyder and Nicholas P. Lovrich.

But if legalization boosts public safety, it appears to strike a small but not insignificant blow to mental health.

Medical Cannabis Legalization and State-Level Prevalence of Serious Mental Illness in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health 2008-2015,” published this month in the International Review of Psychiatry, finds that legalization is positively associated with instances of serious mental illness in states with “liberal” laws, i.e. laws permitting cannabis use for a broad range of medical conditions.

The prevalence of serious mental illnesses was 0.3 percent higher in states with liberal laws compared with other states once cannabis use was taken into account.

Previous research has linked high levels of cannabis consumption with psychotic disorders. Citing such studies, researchers hypothesize that legalization leads to increased use among state residents, which increases users’ likelihood of developing psychosis.

The study’s authors were Lauren M. Dutra, William J. Parish, Camille K. Gourdet , and Jennie L. Wiley, all of RTI International; and Sarah A. Wylie of the Oregon Health Authority.

Nearly half of Americans currently live in states where marijuana use is legal in some form. Authors from both studies stressed the need for further research to verify their claims and to determine what the effects of legalization truly are.

Elena Schwartz is a TCR news intern. Readers’ comments are welcome.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Marcelo Ochoa-Sanchez Stabs Wife in the Street, Presuming She’s Having Affair

  ​ Breakfast reading from the True Crime Report archives: He stabbed Karen Escobar in the street in clear view of numerous witnesses — then went back to his apartment, grabbed another knife and returned with the intention of stabbing her some more. Westword has the story.

The post Marcelo Ochoa-Sanchez Stabs Wife in the Street, Presuming She’s Having Affair appeared first on True Crime Report.

  ​ Breakfast reading from the True Crime Report archives: He stabbed Karen Escobar in the street in clear view of numerous witnesses — then went back to his apartment, grabbed another knife and returned with the intention of stabbing her some more. Westword has the story.

The post Marcelo Ochoa-Sanchez Stabs Wife in the Street, Presuming She’s Having Affair appeared first on True Crime Report.

from http://www.truecrimereport.com

New Report on Chinese Intelligence Cyber-Operations

The company ProtectWise just published a long report linking a bunch of Chinese cyber-operations over the past few years. The always interesting gruqq has some interesting commentary on the group and its tactics. Lots of detailed information in the report, but I admit that I have never heard of ProtectWise or its research team 401TRG. Independent corroboration of this information…

The company ProtectWise just published a long report linking a bunch of Chinese cyber-operations over the past few years.

The always interesting gruqq has some interesting commentary on the group and its tactics.

Lots of detailed information in the report, but I admit that I have never heard of ProtectWise or its research team 401TRG. Independent corroboration of this information would be helpful.

from https://www.schneier.com/blog/