Petition of the day

Petition of the dayThe petition of the day is: Kenosha Unified School District No. 1 Board of Education v. Whitaker 17-301 Issues: (1) Whether a school policy requiring boys and girls to use separate bathroom facilities that correspond to their biological sex is sex stereotyping that constitutes discrimination “based on sex” in violation of Title IX; and (2) whether a […]

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Petition of the day

The petition of the day is:

17-301

Issues: (1) Whether a school policy requiring boys and girls to use separate bathroom facilities that correspond to their biological sex is sex stereotyping that constitutes discrimination “based on sex” in violation of Title IX; and (2) whether a school policy requiring boys and girls to use separate bathroom facilities that correspond to their biological sex is a sex-based classification triggering heightened scrutiny under an Equal Protection analysis.

The post Petition of the day appeared first on SCOTUSblog.

from http://www.scotusblog.com

Mobster fixates on finances of female prosecutor who put him behind bars

An obsessive Gambino crime-family associate has become so fixated on his female prosecutor he’s trying to dig into her finances, it was revealed in court Thursday. Battista “Benny” Geritano is seeking Assistant US Attorney Lindsay Gerdes’ financial disclosure forms, Brooklyn federal court judge Sterling Johnson Jr. informed her after the mobster, who spent the proceeding…

An obsessive Gambino crime-family associate has become so fixated on his female prosecutor he’s trying to dig into her finances, it was revealed in court Thursday. Battista “Benny” Geritano is seeking Assistant US Attorney Lindsay Gerdes’ financial disclosure forms, Brooklyn federal court judge Sterling Johnson Jr. informed her after the mobster, who spent the proceeding...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Meet the Leadership Blog Series: Becoming more involved in IACP

The IACP Board of Directors is comprised of the IACP Executive Board as well as 33 law enforcement leaders appointed by the IACP President. The members of the Board of Directors represent agencies large and small around the globe and … Continue reading

The IACP Board of Directors is comprised of the IACP Executive Board as well as 33 law enforcement leaders appointed by the IACP President. The members of the Board of Directors represent agencies large and small around the globe and govern the IACP. In the IACP’s Meet the Leadership Blog Series, the IACP will feature brief profiles of the 33 appointed members of the Board of Directors.

Name: John R. BatisteBatiste

Title: Chief

Agency: Washington State Patrol

Year Joined the IACP: 1995

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: Early on in my life, my parents and extended family members modeled and demonstrated a great deal of respect for law enforcement. A member of our family also went on to be a police officer in the small town where I grew up.

First Heard about IACP: My chief at the time told me about the organization and he instructed me to join and become an active participant.

Becoming More Involved in IACP: I began to learn about, and personally witness, the many good things that were happening within IACP. I felt becoming more active would be beneficial for my organization’s growth, while also providing an opportunity to share my agency’s experience with others.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: My favorite part of being in law enforcement is helping people that I encounter everyday as well as those I’m privileged to work with.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: The most challenging things that I have to deal with involve fiscal constraints along with staffing shortages caused by recruitment and personnel retention issues.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: My advice to leaders of tomorrow is to become and remain relevant to your agency and the community that you live and work in. Always demonstrate a willingness to listen to, and be able to see things from the angle of others, while adapting to a changing environment. Remember, “one” of us isn’t as smart as “all” of us.


Name: Edward FlynnEd Flynn

Title: Chief of Police

Agency: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Police Department

Year Joined the IACP: 1988

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: I was attracted to law enforcement by the opportunity to do important work that mattered to people in need and neighborhoods at risk.

First Heard about IACP: I learned of IACP as a rookie officer through Police Chief Magazine. I subscribed to stay informed.

Becoming More Involved in IACP: My first chief’s job was in Braintree, Massachusetts and I was selected through a process conducted by the IACP executive search. I was impressed by its professionalism and wanted to get more involved.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: Developing future leaders.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: Partisan politics.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: Accept every assignment as a learning opportunity. READ! Certainly stay current with professional developments, but read histories and biographies as they reveal that the challenges of leadership transcend disciplines and time periods.


Name: Kathleen O’TooleSeattle Annual Gay Pride Parade

Title: Chief of Police

Agency: Seattle, Washington, Police Department

Year Joined the IACP: 1987

Reason for Going into Law Enforcement: Believe it or not, I came into law enforcement on a dare. I was in my second year of law school, and thought it would be interesting to see the practice of law from a different perspective. I joined the Boston, Massachusetts, Police Department and loved it. Little did I know it would turn into a career.

First Heard about IACP: My mentor, Bill Bratton, encouraged me to join the IACP and attend a training course.

Becoming More Involved in IACP: IACP has many opportunities to build valuable networks and exchange knowledge, which is why I became more involved.

Favorite Part About Being in Law Enforcement: I believe that policing is more than just a job—it’s a vocation. I enjoy it because it gives me the chance to make a difference in our community. A lot of people don’t get to see what policing is really about—on television, they see car chases and gun fights. Law enforcement is certainly important, but we spend the majority of time providing services to people in need—even delivering babies and saving lives along the way.

The Most Challenging Part of Law Enforcement: Community trust is essential, but can be a challenge maintaining —it’s very fragile. We know that one incident can undermine relationships we’ve worked hard to build.

One Piece of Advice for the Leaders of Tomorrow: Be authentic and go where the truth takes you, particularly in challenging situations. Stand up, tell the truth, and take responsibility. Your community and your officers will appreciate it, and it will reinforce your organization’s legitimacy.

from https://theiacpblog.org

Inmates sneak back into jail after breaking out

A group of Mississippi inmates busted out of jail this week, burglarized a bargain store — and then broke back in and returned to their cells, according to a report. The jailbirds, identified as Levontaye Ellington, Travis Baker, Maurice Robertson and Jacquiez Williams broke out of the Holmes-Humphreys County Correctional Facility in Lexington Tuesdayby hopping…

A group of Mississippi inmates busted out of jail this week, burglarized a bargain store — and then broke back in and returned to their cells, according to a report. The jailbirds, identified as Levontaye Ellington, Travis Baker, Maurice Robertson and Jacquiez Williams broke out of the Holmes-Humphreys County Correctional Facility in Lexington Tuesdayby hopping...

from http://nypost.com

Categories: Uncategorized

St. Louis Police Shootings Up as Crime Rises

Officers have fatally shot eight people this year, the highest number in the past decade, with more than three months left in the year. Criminologist David Klinger of the University of Missouri-St. Louis said, “As crime rates go up and down, so do police shootings.”

Amid a sixth day of protest after a police officer was found not guilty of murder in a 2011 fatal shooting, family and friends of another man killed by police gathered outside St. Louis’ City Hall on Wednesday. On what would have been Isaiah “Vinny” Hammett’s 22nd birthday, they served birthday cake and tried to draw attention to what they believe was his murder by police, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. Hammett was one of eight people St. Louis police have fatally shot so far this year. It is the highest number of fatal police shootings by city police in the past decade, with more than three months left in the year. There were five people killed by St. Louis police in all of 2016. In addition to those killed, police have shot and wounded seven other people this year. Police say all of those killed by officers were armed. One of them stabbed an officer before being fatally shot.

The remaining seven pointed a gun at officers before they were killed, police said. Three of those, including Hammett, fired at officers before they were fatally shot, according to police. Hammett’s family does not believe the police when they say he fired at officers with an AK-47 when they entered his grandfather’s home to serve a search warrant. The fact that police shootings are up is well known among the ranks, said Lt. Col. Rochelle Jones. As a result, officers have been on heightened alert to wait for backup instead of approaching a potentially dangerous situation alone. They are undergoing training on how to better communicate in stressful situations. Jones attributed the rise in police shootings to the rise in violent crime. She noted aggravated assaults are up 5.6 percent this year compared to last, and aggravated assaults with guns are up 16 percent. Criminologist David Klinger of the University of Missouri-St. Louis said, “As crime rates go up and down, so do police shootings.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

States Take Action Against Disruptive Protests

Many protesters are being more disruptive, whether they’re blocking access to highways, chaining themselves to pipelines, damaging businesses or being physically violent toward other people or property. In response, state lawmakers—mostly Republicans—are seeking new ways to regulate or criminalize protests.

Americans have a constitutional right to assemble and protest, but they don’t have the right to do it in the middle of a freeway. In contrast to demonstrations in recent decades, which often were held in fenced-off “free speech zones,” many protesters are being more disruptive, whether they’re blocking access to highways, chaining themselves to pipelines, damaging businesses or being physically violent toward other people or property. In response, state lawmakers—mostly Republicans—are seeking new ways to regulate or criminalize protests, reports Governing. “You have absolutely zero First Amendment protections or right to assemble in the center lane of I-94,” says Minnesota state Rep. Nick Zerwas, the GOP sponsor of a bill to increase penalties for trespassing on freeways. “Clearly, the current misdemeanor penalty hasn’t been an effective deterrent.”

The bill is part of a national trend. About 20 states are considering new regulations and penalties regarding protests. New laws have been enacted this year in several states, including Georgia, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Some increase penalties for picketing near “critical infrastructure,” such as pipelines and airports. Some call for protesters to pay overtime costs for law enforcement. Some threaten to seize protesters’ assets. Some require colleges and universities to suspend or expel students who disrupt campus speakers. “There’s no question you’ve seen an upsurge in the numbers of these bills and an increase in their stringency,” says Sam Munger of the State Information Exchange, a strategy center for progressive legislators. “It’s both reactive to a recent upsurge in grassroots protests and an effort to intimidate protesters.” Says Indiana University sociologist Fabio Rojas, “This is a very common thing in the history of the United States, to impose some costs on social movements or protest movements. Basically, the whole point of this is to suppress protests.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

WA Sues GEO for Paying Detainees $1 Per Day

The suit accuses GEO of violating state minimum-wage law by paying detainees $1 a day — or sometimes just chips and candy — to work at the nation’s fourth-largest detention center. The company calls what it is doing a “voluntary work program.”

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is taking on the GEO Group, the multibillion-dollar corporation that runs the fourth-largest U.S. detention center, located in Tacoma, the Seattle Times reports. Ferguson sued the company, which operates the Northwest Detention Center and 140 other such facilities nationwide. The suit accuses GEO of violating state minimum-wage law by paying detainees $1 a day — or sometimes just chips and candy — to work at the detention center. “Let’s be honest about what’s going on,” said Ferguson. “GEO has a captive population of vulnerable individuals who cannot easily advocate for themselves. This corporation is exploiting those workers for their own profits.”

GEO projected in 2015 that its Tacoma facility would take in $57 million in revenues annually at full capacity, around 1,575 people. The company earned more than $2 billion in 2016. The Florida-based company uses detainee labor to perform virtually all work at the detention center besides security, says Ferguson. That includes preparing meals, doing laundry and cleaning common areas and restrooms. GEO denied “the baseless and meritless allegations made in this lawsuit,” calling detainee labor a “voluntary work program.” GEO said its wage rates follow standards set “exclusively” by the federal government. That might mean that GEO plans to challenge the state’s authority. Washington’s minimum wage is $11 an hour. Ferguson said the Northwest Detention Center is not a criminal correctional facility; detainees held there are going through civil immigration proceedings.

from https://thecrimereport.org

Trump May Speed Deportation of Unaccompanied Minors

Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to avoid creating a new protected class of undocumented immigrants, given how politically difficult it has been for the administration to unwind the DACA program,

The Trump administration is weighing a policy that would fast-track the deportation of thousands of Central American teenagers who arrived at the southern border unaccompanied by adults, McClatchy Newspapers reports. Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to avoid creating a new protected class of undocumented immigrants, given how politically difficult it has been for the administration to unwind the DACA program, which protected young people brought by adults to the U.S. illegally when they were children. The new policy would call for expedited deportation of another group — the more than 150,000 children who arrived at the southern border alone, escaping violence and poverty in El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. Under the plan, teens in this group would be sent back to their countries when they turn 18 under a fast-track deportation, which means they would not see an immigration judge first.

The proposal is being drafted via memos circulated between the Justice and Homeland Security departments. It has set off an aggressive debate inside these departments among staff charged with reducing illegal immigration, government lawyers who worry about legal exposure and political operatives who see the public controversy this could fuel. “This is being viewed as a way to say that there will not need to be a new DACA,” said a former U.S. Justice Department official who is familiar with the planning. “But this is far from decided. The concern is that most people at DOJ know this will likely be viewed as illegal and do not want to have to defend this in court if they can avoid it.”

from https://thecrimereport.org

Are Local Jails Violating Immigrants’ Rights?

Murkiness surrounding national immigration policy is causing local violations of imprisoned immigrants’ Fourth Amendment rights, say advocates and attorneys. Immigrants–even those who entered the country illegally–are protected against illegal search and seizure, meaning they can’t be held beyond the time they are entitled to release.

Murkiness surrounding national immigration policy is causing local violations of imprisoned immigrants’ Fourth Amendment rights, say many advocates and attorneys. In recent weeks, advocates say, undocumented immigrants in Ohio’s Hamilton and Butler counties were held 48 hours longer than U.S. citizens for the same charge, allowing them to be seized by federal officers and put into deportation proceedings, reports the Cincinnati Enquirer. Immigrants–even those who entered the country illegally–are protected against illegal search and seizure, meaning they can’t be held beyond the time they are entitled to release.

At issue are detainers issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which ask local jails to hold undocumented prisoners for 48 additional hours beyond U.S. citizens’ release for the same offense. In Hamilton County, where the sheriff’s department operates the Justice Center, immigration advocates met for more than two hours last week with Sheriff Jim Neil. Some members of the local Immigrant Dignity Coalition say the department has been breaking its own carefully crafted policy by cooperating with ICE in holding immigrant prisoners. Immigration attorney Charleston Wang, attended the meeting and said coalition members were told that the sheriff’s department would make sure its command staff and rank-and-file officers would receive training on the policy. “There may be instances where the policy was exceeded and not followed,” Wang said. Federal courts in California, Illinois and Texas and a state court in Massachusettes have ruled against the use of ICE detainers on grounds of Fourth Amendment violations. They are administrative warrants, judges have ruled, and lack the necessary authority of a warrant issued by a judge or magistrate.

from https://thecrimereport.org